Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 5, 1933 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 5, 1933, Mason City, Iowa                                fi I Iowas for VOL XXXIX THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION FIVE CENTS A COPV ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE SERVICE MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY MAY 5 1933 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 182 Revolt Signs Impressive Congress Hopes Its Relief Plans Will Be Effective By CHARLES P STEWART ASHINGTON May 5 Members or con S r c s s both houses are in general agree ment that there had better be no I mistake about the reasonably s a t i s f a ctory i workingof the I relief plans they are adopting at the current ex tra session A s u r p r 1 s ingly large num ber of them are frank to say that they think the country is giving them their last chance as nt present consti tuted to make at last a fair start toward curing the depression Signs of actual revolt far and wide in recent weeks by no means have failed to produce an impres sion on the lawmakers They are not so fearful of marches on Washington These have an element of the spectacular in them which the legislators inter pret as incompatible with a 300 per cent determination on the demon strators part to readjust conditions basically Stay iit Homes What makes the wiser politicians worry is the attitude of the stay at homes who show an Inclination to make things over in their own com munities Last years farm strikes caused grave anxiety in Washington The present demonstrations are re garded as a still more serious man ifestation not only as having been longer asimmering but as a devel opment in the very face of pending relief promises which do not seem to take with the yeomanry as it was hoped thy would There also was a genuineness about the teachers uprising in Chi Al Bitterness Groivs i Hints of growing bitterness in centers where banks have not yet reopened since the moratorium have not been lost upon watchers n the more so that they involve a class which ordinar ily is least susceptible to radical influences Only occasionally from the ultra advanced among the solons like Senator Wheeler of the democratic group or Senator LaFollette of the republicans is the word revolu Turn In 1njtc i Culunui t DOLLAR DOWN ON PARIS EXCHANGE Bankers Sell Dollar to Buy Pound Dollar Weaker in London PARIS May 5 Amer ican dollar touched a new low today while the British pound gained strength on the Paris bourse as a result bankers said of active selling of dollars and buying of pounds The dollar closed at 2120 francs The pound which opened at 8460 francs closed at 8485 Drops More Than 6 Cents LONDON May 5 The United States dollar took a sharp downward slide to a quotation of to the pound in todays trad ing but it closed at a stronger level of S397VS under moderate pur chases This was a drop of more than 6 cents from yesterdays close of The French franc made a stead ier showing because of official sup port AUNT MET By Robeit Quillen Maybe Amys explana tion is right but its a queer tiling to me that none o her children lit on their feet when they fell LOCAL BUTTER TRUCK HIJACKED Accuses Holiday Group of Racketeer Methods OCONNORAVERS FARMERS WERE MADE TO SIGN UP Reno Denies Charges of Intimidation and Threats DES MOINES May 5 Out racketeering methods were used to recruit the membership of the Farm Holiday association in the farm dirorder area of Iowa At torney General Edward L OCon nor charged today The attorney general who re turned from the counties in which disorders have occurred estimated that not more than 25 per cent of the holiday association members in that area were willing mem bers and that the remainder were enlisted through threats and intim idation Farmers were forced to join and pay 75 cents for a membership card under the threat that their barns strawstacks and other property might he burned OConnor said True Picture Shown It is only since the national juard troops have been sent into the area that the true picture of the activities has come to light OConnor said He explained that previously 1armers and businessmen bad feared to talk to authorities about the situation Milo Reno president of the Na tional Farm Holiday association made a vigorousdenial of the state f Declaring that he was extreme ly sorry that the attorney general of Iowa would make such a state ment Reno said he was sure that methods such as OConnor described were not used If as he says intimidation was used to force farmers to join I would say it is as likely that in timidation has Seen used to obtain testimony telling what is not true to the military inquiry Reno said Will Not Tell Truth If a man is so weak that he will not tell the truth in the face of opposition he will invariably tell what is not true when enough pressure is laid on him Reno declared some time ago that no communist activity had been al lowed in connection with the farm holiday movement and that mem bers of the association actively re sisted any efforts of communitsts to use the organization as a tool to further their aims Businessmen were afraid to talk for fear they would get a rock Will Rogers WASHINGTON May Foreign delegations coming in here to join Mr Roosevelts bread line Italys and Oklahomas got in the same day man named Jung sent by Dictator Mussolini to see what Lady Bountiful held in story for Italy man named Rogers sent by Dictator Alfalfa Bill Murray sent to pick up any loose crumbs that might fall locally Congress disgraced themselves something terrible There was for three solid hours they didnt pass a single bll not even an appropriation bill Then they realized how slow they were going and woke up and practically passed a little dinky thing only appropriating one hundred million for the insur ance companies hardly worth monkeyingwith Yours WILL ROGERS Copyright 1033 McNauGht Syndicate STRIKE DEPENDS UPON CONGRESS Reno Says Holiday to Begin May 13 Unless Demands Are Met DES MOINES May 5 Farmers of the nation will strike on May 13 unless their legislative demands on congress are met Milo Reno president of the national farm holiday association declared today V j only vent the strike will bethe passage by congress between now and May 13 of the measures for agricultural relief which the association has de manded Reno declared If the demands of the holiday association are met he added the decision on calling the strike will rest with the board of directors The board has powers equal to those of the convention under the pro visions of our constitution and it must determine the degree with which our demands have been met Give Laborers Fond The executive board of the asso ciation which is composed of the presidents of state holiday associa tions this morning agreed that the labor and industrial groups which are sympathetic with the strike movement and subscribe to the con tentions of the association will be furnished food at cost of production prices during the strike Reno declined today to discuss the picketing of LliifV 1UL 1CCH tut j rrvymii fy through their window OConnor method of enforcing the farm strike stated Now they are opening up I which was resorted to a year ago after attempts to persuade farmers and talking freely Communist Agitators The attorney general said further that the operations of the holiday association backers were just an other racket He also said that not all those involved in the farm dis order are farmers Evidence uncovered through the arrests also indicate that commun istic agitators had their part in the recent opposition to farm mortgage sales OConnor said He recalled that in some arrests at Sioux City considerable red literature was uncovered OConnor explained that while he did not believe the alleged commun ists played a part in the early ac tivities in the area they gradual ly filtered in supplying leadership and egging on the actual farmers To Make Trouble Many of those engaged in the violence were not in financial diffi culties the attorney general said The case was that the activities appealed to the type of person who wants to make trouble Of course there were some members embittered by economic conditions They were not all farm ers however It was learned that the Holiday association had set up its own courts OConnor said Lawyers had been practicing and hearing to join the movement had failed He announced that the board had voted to take over the majiagement and operation of the Farm Holiday News a paper published at St Paul as the mouthpiece of the holiday association Stock will state associations and be sold board control will supervise the publica tion 3 Vice Presidents The appointment of three national j in the riot vice presidents who will serve as Begin to Free Men Innocent in Farm Riot Military Court Hopes to Complete Work Saturday LE MARS May 5 prisoners held at the Iowa national guard camp were released today by the military court as it neared com pletion of its investigation into an attack on Judge C c Bradley and other farm disturbances Officials of the court said they hoped to finish their inquiry late to morrow Eightyfive prisoners and witnesses to the attack and the storming of the OBrien county courthouse during a mortgage fore closure sale last week have been questioned Contains 84 Men The camp prison today contained 84 men including two new arrivals Karl A J Stabe and Adolph F Max Blankenburg Blankenburg who was reported as threatening to shoot it out if guardsmen tried to arrest him walked into camp and surrendered The four released were Frank Hinz Leonard Gier and the Rev George E Brown of OBrien county and Ray Martin of near Kingsley Haynes Tours County Col Glenn C Haynes camp com mander toured Plymouth county to day addressing mayor and Ameri can Legion posts as to the purpose of sending the guard into northwest Iowa Guardsmen will attend special church services Sunday at 9 a m with the Rev C H Von Metre reg imontal of in charge 7 The guards have christened them selves members of the M E Mortgage Expeditionary Forces They are holding daily drills with machine gun practice and other mil itary practice Troop Defy Threat Defying a threat from County At torney James Smith to arrest guardsmen if they entered his county to make arrests the militia men pushed into Cherokee yester day and apprehended two more sus Dunn and Emil Klabe They are suspected of a part in the recent assault on District Judge C C Bradley Following the invasion County Attorney Smith gave the militia a tongue lashing predicting a grand jury investigation if the prisoners were taken against their will Begin to UelcnsR Some DBNISON May 5 Dalton one of the men held here by the Iowa national guard in con nection with the Joseph Shields farm riot last week wa9 released today by Captain Merle Hawkins of Red Oak head of the military po lice Captain Hawkins said that more releases would be made later to day to make room for additional prisoners being brought in The jails established in various parts of the courthouse as well as the city jail are now filled to capacity The releases will be made as soon as the military court officials are able to determine which of those held did not play an active part LOCALS STILL IN LEAD AT STATE MUSIC CONTEST Mason City High School Gets Six Ratings as UP 5 oupenor IOWA CITX May 5 City continued to hold its lead in the state music contest today with ratings of superior in six events and excellent in several others Following were Roosevelt of DCS Moincs North Des Moincs Shenan doah West of Waterloo East of Waterloo and Abraham Lincoln of Council Bluffs The campus of the University of Iowa was thronged with the con testants as they arrived in special buses and automobiles The crowd was estimated at 2500 persons Competition continued today with glee club and orchestra events Schools with entries in two or more events include Burlington Iowa German Reichsbank Head Arrives for Conference Schacht Thinks U S Can Solve World Problems supervisors of districts pending the election of permanent officers was also announced by Reno R L Rickard of Oklahoma City Okla was named to supervise the south west district composed of Okla homa Texas and New Mexico Arnold Gilberts of Madison Wis was named for the district com posed of Wisconsin Iowa Illinois Indiana Ohio and Missouri John C Scott of Craryville N Y was ap pointed vice president of the north east district Others will be named later for the Pacific coast west j central and southeast districts Additional Clauses Included in the strike resolutions were additional clauses calling for resubmission of the associations de mands to congress and the placing in operation of a plan calling for the issuance of one billion dollars Dalton after he was given freedom said they treated swell farm litigation in these super in scrip money by an international courts he added To Other Counties Referring to practice of intimi dation and agitation which he said was pursued by the farm Holiday association members OConnor said small groups went from county to county by trucks to carry on the work I council the money to he used as a medium for the medium of ex change of farm products and manu factured goods between farmers and industrial workers of the country Other resolutions demanding the immediate withdrawal of state troops from Le Mars and Denison A group from outside the county would deal with a farmer and then move on to another county where another group would handle the situation he explained This course was followed to pre vent the ideitification of the ring leaders he said Iowa demanding that congress re tain its function of issuing money and regulating its value urged im mediate payment of the exservice mens adjusted compensation in treasury certificates demanding that the cost of production program Iurn lo Inge 2 Column 6 SECURITIES BILL READY TO PASS House Limits Debate Upon Act Conferees Agree on Relief Bill WASHINGTON May 5 Passage of the Rayburn Securities regulation bill was assured today in the house upon adoption of pro cedure through a voice vote limit ing debate to five hours and pre cluding all but committee amend ments Action came after an hour of de bate in which no one opposed the purposes of the legislation request ed by President Roosevelt Senate and house conferee today reached an agreement on the 000000 relief bill clearing the way for final approval LEAVE FOR HOME Word received in Mason City Friday afternoon from Principal Tames Rae stated the local mu sicians would arrive home in buses at 11 oclock Friday night Three soloists and the small brags group will return Saturday City Centralof Sioux City Denl son Story City Well man Northwood Sigourney Dy sart Mount Ayr and Sibley Results were Girls Glee club ClnsH C Super ior none Excellent Sergeant Bluff Casey Traer Wellmnn Good Moor head State Center Farragut Orange township Orchestra Class B Osagc excellent Clear Lake Good Sigourney Monticello Mixed chorus Class A ior Roosevelt of Des Moines Excel lent Burlington Davenport Du buque Good Mason City East Wat erloo Mixed chorus Class none excellent Maceclonin Orange City Gilbert Wellman Good Orange township Rodman Tenor Edmund Mbrley Clarinda Excellent Earl Appley Ottumwa Good Guiles Growell Ida Grove Lester Jensen Vinton school for the blind Harvey Uhlenhopp Hampton Robert Trot ter North Des Moines Ward Miller Wellman Soprano Laurale Goeldner Sigourney Excellent Lydia Brockman Paullina Evelyn Hall Washington of Cedar Rapids Good Madalynne Powell Mason City Virginia Hill Red Oak Eileen Grcnnell Roosevelt of Des Moines Hoys Glee club HUSH A perior none Excellent East Des Moines Davenport Burlington Good none Hoys glen cellent Sigourney good Story City Sibley Toledo Eldora training school infixed none excellent Ames Orchestra Wellman Plover excellent Orange City Shannon City Girls glen perior Creston good Perry Fort Madison Abraham Lincoln Council Bluffs Mixnil chorus lent Loon Northwood Sigourney good Mount Ayr Girls gler perior Roosevelt Des Moincs excel lent Mnson City Burlington good West Waterloo Davenport Members of the Mason City girls small vocal group are Ruth Morgan Madalynne Powell Esther Storer Margaret Handel Frances MacMil Tiirn In JnftB 2 nlnmn C Will Discuss Mosplliil Costs MINNEAPOLIS May 5 Representatives of 225 hospitals in Minnesota will discuss hospital costs and problems May 25 and 26 when the Minnesota Hospital asso ciation convenes here for its annual convention WASHINGTON May o or Hjalmar Schacht as spokesman or Chancellor Adolf Hitler of Ger many reached Washington early this afternoon to begin economic discussions at the white house with President Roosevelt Hus Taken Initiative NEW YORK May 5 Hjalmer Schacht head of the Ger man reichsbank arrived today for economic discussions with Presi lent Roosevelt and expressed the jelicf that this country is the only i able to solve the worlds prob ems It is fine that America has tak n the initiative he said aboard he liner Deutschland before being ransfcrred at quarantine to the city welcome tug Macom because ve think you arc the only people vho can solve the worlds prob ems I am instructed by my chanccl or to express his warm regard and for your courageous resident No Dual Currency Before boarding the Macom the Icrman envoy to President Roose velts informal series of interna ional conversations said that there was no intention of dual cur rency so far as official circles were concerned Schacht was met at quarantine by Victor Ridder publisher who ia prominent in GermanAmerican af fairs and was closely guarded by police Tha Macom proceeded from direct to Jersey City N J where a special train was wait ing to take him to Washington BESCRIBEFARM COMMERCE AIDS Wallace and Roper Speak Before U S Chamber of Commerce WASHINGTON May D cabinet officers described to the Chamber of Commerce of the Uni ted States today their plans for as sisting agriculture and commerce Henry A Wallace secretary of agriculture and Daniel C Roper secretary of commerce asked the cooperation of the business lead ers in working out schemes they believe will aid in the countrys re covery from the depression Roper proposed tt presidents council in business to advise with the government on economic condi tions Wallace asncd that agriculture and industry travel in double luir noss as a team with the load equal ly divided between them Kecalls 1roposnls Recalling the many proposals made recently for reviving the coun cil of national defense or the war industries board the Wilson ad ministration the commerce secre tary proposed the presidents coun cil as an alternative At the same time he outlined his plans for re organizing the commerce depart ment the move necessitating sharp curtailment of the bureau of foreign and domestic commerce Roper also said hia plans call for the setting up in the department of a great bureau of transportation for regula tion of all transportation agencies and probably communications The business council as outlined by Roper would consist of not more than 21 representatives of Ameri can commercial life properly dis tributed geographically and indus trially Wallace said that the adminis tration of the new farm bill will be practical nnd fair LOSS VALUED AT BY STATE BRAND OFFICIAL Bandits Force Kenney Pittenger to Ride in DK HJALMAIl SCIIACT Raise for Wages Roosevelt Plan to Aid Recovery Government Production ant Competition Control Advocated WASHINGTON May E lT The nations business was pointed noon today by Freaident Roosevelt to higher wage scales and a govern Their Car Federation of Labor Calls on Members to Protect Wage Scale WASHINGTON May 5 The American Federation of Labor called upon its membership today to mobilize its fighting strength to protect the Workers standard of living from the price boosts which the inflation plan is designed to bring about Only last night Presi dent Roosevelt appealed to business executives for wage increases to keep pay in line with rising prices Will Vote Monday on Cost of Production WASHINGTON May 5 ITl Speaker Rniney today set Monday for the house vote on the lone amendment holding up final action on the farm reliefinflation the NorrisSimpson cost of produc tion proposal Former Publisher of Sioux City Paper Dies MILWAUKEE May 5 neral arrangements were being mnde for O M Levang 05 farmer publisher of a weekly newspaper at Sioux City who died yesterday In he established his paper there Twenty thousand pounds of but ter valued at belonging to the Iowa State Brand creameries were hijacked by four bandits at the edge of Chicago early Friday morning and the Billman company truck in which the butter was being transport ed was stolen The loss of the butter was cov ered by insur ance according to R O Storvick manager of the creamery Leonard Ken ney 21 former Mason City high school athlete the driver and Dean Pittenger 35 his assist ant said they were forced into the bandit car at a west side highway intersection and taken to a down town corner where they were re leased Two of the gunmen mean while had driven away the truck load of butter The robbery oc curred about 5 oclock The butter was being transported from the creamery here to the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea company The truck load ot bultei left Mason city Thursday atter nient supervised control of produc tion and competition The hopes of the president which will be supplemented shortly by a broad legislative proposal to carry them into effect were outlined in general terms in a brief address last night before the Chamber of Commerce of the United States Today his advisers who have ucen working for weeks brought to com pletion legislation designed to bring about this new order in business lovernment sanctioned trade asso ciations to govern production wage and competition agreements are contemplated To Stimulatij Business This proposal probably will be nade a part of the public works jil which the president is framing o stimulate business in a counter attack upon deflation Placing great emphasis upon his vordg as he spoke before the Ims ness leaders last night Mr Roose elt said It is essential as a matter of lational justice that the wage scale should be brought back to meet the ost of living and that this pro gress should begin now ilnrj not ater The employers of American work ers applauded the president hesi Four Men Who Tried to Buy Guns Let Go After Questioning DAVENPORT May 5 men who police claimed to be rep resentatives of Illinois coal mining companies wore released today after authorities had questioned them regarding inquiries they are said to have made in Rock Island and Davenport about girns silencer and ammunition Police said todciv they hnd no charges upon which t hold the men atcd as if the his assertion more to emphasize Then he In a few words his ilans to bring order out of chaos Minority 1reveiitod Gual In almost every industry he said an overwhelming majority of the units of the industry are oily willing to work together to prevent overproduction to prevent mfair wages to eliminate improper working conditions In the past success in attaining these objectives has been prevented by a small min ority of units in many Industries I can assure you that you will have the cooperation of your govern ment in bringing these minorities to understand that their unfair practices are contrary to sound pub lic policy There is still a lot of work to be done in organizing legislation to accomplish this program It in volves a relaxation of the anti trust laws Also apparently it in volves substitution of the SO hour work week bill already passed by the senate and now before the house Has 1rojectcd Ilnn Secretary Perkins has projected a plan for government control over wages and hours of work This leg islation apparently is to be the al ternative to voluntary industrial submission to the Roosevelt plan of government supervision Leaders of the chamber of com merce have been driving strongly for government supervision rniher than government control One af ter another they have urged it Discussing the national situa tion Mr Roosevelt told the rham ber there has been a slight but definite upturn in most Industrie1 Turn LBge J Column TORNADO KILLS 20 IN ALABAMA More Than 200 Injured as Wind Sweeps Through 3 Communities BIRMINGHAM Ala May 5 ili Twenty persons were killed and more than 200 injured by a Lornudn hat swept three westcentral ama communities shortly before dawn today The mining town of Helena wan The number of dead and injured mounted hourly as rescue crews dug into splinterad piles of wreck c The town Helena with H pop ulation of 700 was hardest hit ami eight of the dead were listed thcrr More than two score were injured and twothirds of the was left homeless population Coalmonl The little hamlet of was reported wiped out Two were killed at Centerville three at Brent and unverified re ports told of other deaths Union Grove AdamsvHIe and other smnll communities were reported struck by the storm which dipped first near Demopolis in Mirengo about 1 a m nnd struck Helcnii about 3 a m She Wea IOWA WEATHER Clonily min prnluihln in cnst and central portions Friday night and Saturday not much clmiigc in temperature LOCAL STATISTICS GlobeGazette weather figures for 24 hour period ending nt 8 oclock Friday morning Maximum Thursday HO Minimum in Night 42 At 8 a m IS   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication