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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 26, 1929 - Page 7

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 26, 1929, Mason City, Iowa                                DECEMBER 26 1929 MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE JEANETTE BEYER GIVES RECIPES FOR FOREIGN FOODS Cooking Expert Explains Planning Varied Menus Culinary Secrets of Chinese Boys Will Add Interest to American Meals What shall I have for dinner tonight The familiar plaint of thi housewife usually finds a stereotyped answer Much as she longs to aervi Her family something different something different is hard to dls cover Usually the meal in question is only the timehonored combination of meat and potatoes vegetable and dessert But ifyou are one of the cooks who longs to add the spice of variety to her menus you will find real assistance Talks today Miss Beyer prompted by the suggestion of a reader recently has collectec recipes for favorite dishes from other lands You are sure to find some dish with which to vary the formula Jeonel Beyer Some Chinese Cooking When E M S wrote that foreign cookingwas her hobby and shed like to see dishes of various nation printed iu the Table Talks she rsal ly starteds omething For nearly al of our family menus could bear a least a little foreign enlivenment True after the exotic dishes ar translated into American by ou food habits and the limits of ou markets they would no doubt b unrecognizable to a native Still they are a relief from meat pota toes and pie and a tiny sop to thos of us who long for faraway lands It was lots fun one Sundaj night when two Chinese student came to our house to cook Not a thing would they let us buy for them and when I arrived home a oclock there they were installec in the kitchen with pots and ket ties out and meat grinder fastenei to the table They had found every thing and the ingredients for th suppers three dishes were lined up in rows the rice already steaming on the stove Mr Shu stood very businesslike with watch in hand already to be gin cooking on the exafct minute ti complete the supper by the time th other guests were invited to arrive Mr Ku did some of the explaining The dishes werent after all what culinary artist can entitle her choicest compositions In my notebook I jotted down these observations Mr Shus Dish No 1 This was begun first In my larg est skillet he put about two ounces ot lard and two tablespoons of soj sauce Then he added a pound of ground pork and browned it well a poundof fresh mushrooms cleaned and sliced These were r vuw wj L cake cut in small chunks was put in last Tlce mixture was cooked five minutes after the bean cako J was put in and 15 minutes before The dish was kept hot iu the oven f until served The bean cake the boys got in New York On the can it was la belled Tow Foo Mr Ku said it was called bean cheese When cooked it I has a flavor a little like egg Mr Kus Dish No 11 As Mr Shu promised this was a masterpiece Chinese or celery cab bage was cut lengthwise and fried in plenty oflard Then a little water was added and it was allowed to cook about 10 minutes Some of the liquid was poured off and Mr Ku added two tablespoons of oyster i sauce and continued cooking the ycabbaga until it was tender Then i m small amount of Chinese Sausage wag added and the dish kept hot until tt was served The oyster sauce and Chinese sausage were also New York products Mr Ku said The sausage seemed like little pieces of ham and fat well cured Sir Shus Dish No 111 Pork was cut in thin strips and fried to lard until well cooked Then a can of bamboo shoots cut up was added and the mixture cooked at least 10 minutes Green peppeV was put in cut up seeds and all This was cooked about five minutes but not until the pepper had lost its crispncss There was soy sauce in thia too How ta Cook Rice Tha Chinese way of cooking rice 1s a boon if youve been one of the cooks who has tried every other method with quite indifferent suc cess The method is BO simple and BO workable every time you must know It XIse twice as much cold water as rice the boys Bay Boil it rapidly until the rice swells Then turn the heat down and keep very low for about 20 minutes or more with the kettle covered This makes the grains stand out separately and they are quite dry with a nutty flavor The water does not need to be poured off as it completely evaporates Nor is It necessary to Ticse the rice after cooking Of course if you have a Chinese appetite you dont eat bread but rice Yet these thotful boys had even brot bread for us and milk to use in the tea altko good Chinese tea is too delicious to spoil its aroma with cream sugar lemon or spice The finest Chinese teas Mr Shu told us are green very strong and very expensive No one in China drinks cold water Ono wouldnt dare for fear of infection For the same reason practically all foods Lare cooked Use Chinese Another Chinese dinner served by Mrs M was also delightful Mr M I had brot home from his visit to IChina many llnons dishes and I chopsticks along with other curios llWhen we came to the dinner table I each of us had exactly one bowl and lone pair of chopsticks to manlpu llate the beat chop suey Ive ever tasted Into the bowls first pu rice then a generous serving o chop suey then a few sprinkling of crisp little noodles and finally dash of soy sauce After a few min utes they are goo chopsticks were no hin drance at all not of course men tioning a few accidents to the Chi nese linen and the little bowls wer filled a good many times Tho chop suey is said not to bo a Chinese dish at all but actuall originated in America the ingredl cuts and the way of cutting them up in small pieces Is Chjnese Mrs M was a generous hostess and le me help her prepare this most ex cellent dish Mrs Mg Best Chop Suey Have three pounds ot rather lean veal and pork ground together Frj In a smalt quantity of fat until th meat is just slightly browned and has lost Its pinkish look using s very large kettle Add two cans o subkum which is a mixture o bamboo shoots water chestnuts ant bean sprouts with the bamboo anc chestnuts cut up a little Cut up and add about four bunch es of celery crosswise and one onion inthinslices Steam at leas three minutes In a bowl mix three tablespoons of sugar three table spoons of water to moisten and three or four table spoons of soy sauce Add to the meat mixture and allow to simmer A few minutes before serving ad two large green peppers cut in Ehor matchlike strips onehalf pound o mushrooms washed and cut up o one can and onehalf cup of broken pecan meats Serve very soon The order of putting in ingredients very important The Eternal Question Dea Beyer I enjoy your Table Talks very much the apple recipe contest espe cially which gave ua many fine re cipes and if you will pardon me j have been thinking how nice i would have been if you had prizes for the beat most economical anc easily made Christmas candy cake and cooky recipes Will you pleas tell us how to make a perfect me rlngue one which will not be tough fall or turn to liquid Thankingyou Mrs W S We are going to have another re cipe contest very soon Ill save your Christmas suggestion for next year as I think It would be fine too Meringue a Meringues are tricky things and require technique Being egg white which is protein and toughens with high temperatures they must be baked just right and that I think is the chief secret Put the meringue into moderate oven from 300 to 350 degrees and leave it there for at least 15 to 20 minutes ta that way it will be tender and yet thor oly done so that it will not fall nor turn to liquid Then getting the sugar well dis solved is also important I use about twotablespoons of sugar t6 one egg white beating the whites until they are quite frothy but not yet stiff then beating in the sugar a little at a time until the mixture is very fluffy and almost ropy Meringues are so delicious and so beautiful theyre worth practicing on until you can do them perfectly every time Your Favorite Recipe Have you made your New Years resolutions yet v One of them I hope is to be a good cook in 1930 and to send me some of your fam ilys favorites B N fears she comes too often Not a bit of It She took me in earn est this fall about the fat pig j wish I did have one But all of you who do will welcome her scrapple Dont they call this headcheese in Iowa She writes I have noted so many times the recipe for Oldtime Scrapple and lever yet have I seen one In print iat was the real oldtlhie Scrapple I have a recipe that was given to me years ago by an old lady who iftd made it for years The recipes iiat I have always seen printed called for cornmeal alone and this s far from right So I thot perhaps as you mentioned buyinga fat pig you might like the real scrapple ecipe B NT Oldtime Scrapple Used About a Hundred Years Ago and Now I use the plfb head hocks and scraps Clean well boll In plain water till meat falls from bones easily Dip out all solids separate he meat from the bones chop and grind very fine strain the liquid icld half as much water as you have iquid and let corns to a good boll Prepare a mixture of cornmeal nehalf wheat middlings one ourth buckwheat flour onefourth Salt and black pepper the liquid to beef pork taste and when boiling briskly slowly add the grain mixture stir ring all the time Take care not to scorch Make it thick enough so that the stlrrer will staaduprlght In the mixture then work In the chopped meat till the whole thing is well mixed Dip out in tins about like bread tins and set to cool When wanted slice about a half inch thick and fry a golden brown in a hot pan The buckwheat is the secret of its making it golden brown and also gives it the Straining the liquid removes al bits of bones that one hates to bite on Help Wanted O K of Hanlontown was gener ous this week and sent us some de licious things In return she would like to have a recipe for peppernuts She says they are cookies small and are sort of peaks The first two dishes she gives are good win ter ones The icebox cake can be done outofdoors in good January weather O K Is quite cosmopoli tan in her tastes and gives us Swe dish Italian and Norwegian re cipes Swedish Meat Balls One and onefourth pound ground One and onefourth pound veal ground One and onefourth pound ground Three eggs Onehalf cup milk Onehalf cup butter One and onehalf cup mashed pota i toes Salt and pepperll Add potatoes milk butter sea soning and eggs beaten separately to ground meat Shape in balls and roll In cracker crumbs First brown la hot grease then put in ovea and bake and steam till done Italian Noodles I dont know whether this origin ated in Italy or not But It is a very nica hot dish for luch Onehalf pound fresh pork shoulder One and onehalf pound mild cheese Onehalf pound noodles Three tablespoons butter Three tablespoons flour One quart tomatoes Boil noodles 15 minutes in salted water and drain Cut meat in quite small pieces and simmer in butter unti tender Make a tomato sauce by heating butter and flour togeth er and add tomato juice and pulp which has been put thru a sieve About three cups of juice and pulp Add to this sauce a tablespoon of minced onion Season with salt and pepper and a little paprika utter a baking dish and put a layer of noodles in the bottom Cut cheese very ttiin and lay on top of noodles Then add meat and tomato sauce then another layer of noodles cheese meat and sauce Bake 20 minutes In hot oven Add a layer of cornflakes on top to make a crisp and tasty top crust Fluffy White Cake Threefourths cup butter Two cups sugar Two teaspoons baking powder One cup milk Seven egg whites One teaspoon vanilla Three cups pastry flour sifted be fore measuring Cream butter sugar add milk and then cake flour in which baking powder has been sifted vanilla beat wcl fold in egg whites stirring only enough to mix Do not beat after eggs have been added Bake in moderate hot oven A Norwegian Recipe One cup washed butter One cup sugar Three eggs Two ciips flour Cream butter and sugar well Add eggs one at a time then flour Form into bow knots the width of a pencil and sprinkle with almonds and sugar Bake in moderately hot oven Pineapple IceBox Cake Place onehalf cup sugar and one fourth cup water In double boiler Beat until sugar melts Very slowly add four beaten egg yolks stirring until thick and smooth Let cool Cream one cup butter add two cups powdered sugar then add egg mix ture after it has been cooled Add one cup crushed pineapple from which juice has been drained Fold in four stiffly beaten egg whites which contain two tablespoons x of powdered sugar and onehalf tea spoon vanilla Line dish with lady fingers and fill witb mixture Place in icebox for 12 hours Serve with sauce or whipped crtim Thanking my neighbors and you for former helps in Hanlontown rrZENPETERSON FOREST CITY Dec Rose Itzen of Hayfield and Iver Peterson of Forest City were mar ried at the Immanuel Lutheran par sonage Tuesday the Rev J A M Hinderlie performing the ceremony A wedding dinner was given by the bridegrooms mother Mrs P B Peterson following the ceremony With the Women of Today MISS ALICE ROBERTSON By LILIAN CAMPBELL Miss Alice Robertson was the firs woman sent to congress by Oka homa and the second voman to si in congress the first being Mis Jeannette Rankin of Montana It has recently become known that Miss Robertson at an advance age is facing adversity and the Ok lahoma Memorial association has es tablished a fund for her care am maintenance Three years ago Miss Robertson home at Muskogee Sawokia1 known to hundreds of exservic1 men of the World war burned and since then sle has been largely de pendent on the bounty of friends During war times thousands o soldiers passed thru Muskogee ate at her restaurant and no on was allowed to pay for what he ate In fact Miss Robertson employed a man to serve hot coffee to the sol diers on the trains Since her retirement from Wash ington and the burningof her horn she has been compelled to sell many of her heirlooms and Indian relics in order to raise money Born in Indian Territory Miss Robertson was boru in In ciian Territory several years befon the Civil war Her parents were mis sionaries among the Creek Indians After spending her childhood in Territory she was sent to Elmira college New York and later oh tained a clerical position in the de partment of Indian affairs in Wash ington leaving there voluntarily to accept a position as teacher in the Indian mission schools N When her father died she returned to Indian Territory to continue hi work among the Indians and cstab llshed the Nuyaka mission among the Creeks for many years one o the outstanding schools in the Creek nation Theodore Roosevelt appointed her postmistress at Muskogee a city of about 30000 Inhabitants Thru that appointment she became known over the country as she was the first woman to be appointed postmistress in a city of that size Thru all these yeara she was a leader in all movements having to do with the education of the In dians orwith the cultural advance ment of those who were flocking to the southwest to establish their homes Her home built largely ol native stone and wood a hill overlooking the city ot Mus kogee In acknowledgment of her serv ice to humanity and to the state the Oklahoma Memorial association states it has set itself the task of ministering to Mtas Robertsons comfort after which the couple left for a short wedding trip to the twin cities They will be at home at Forest City after Jan 1 Mr Peterson Is em ployed by the state highway com mission Artificial TEETH and Up A Craven plate at 510 is not an ordinary a plate built by our ex perts to give you service and have the correct ap pearance Plate Repairing CRAVENS PLATE SHOPPES 18 First St S E 306 Eighth St DCS Molnes OutofTown Customers Write 410 Locust St Wise Mother Allows Child Chance to Help Make Home Attractive By ALICE JUDSON PEALE Mother those are hideous old hangings I wish we had new ones They are pretty shabby but hangings are so expensive and Im so very busy that I didnt want to undertake shopping about until I found something good lookingthat wo could afford And then I would have to make them too and I didnt see how I could possibly find the time Id love to help mother I can sew on the machine now you know and I know just what sort of hangings we ought to have They ought to be a soft gray green with dull rose in them to go with our plummy colored carpet Dont you think that would be lovely Would they cost such a lot Mother finally agreed they would make a search rmShev shopped They brot home a dozen ormore samples each and had a beautiful time looking them over Thev agreed upon something that mother knew to be practical and in good tast5 and that wasnt so far away from Bettys dream of what the liv ing room hangings should be Together they sewed thenew curtains and when they were fin ished and put up at last the living room was not only much more at tractive to the visual eye but there had been added to it at least for the people who lived In it the in tangible but rea quality that comes to any place In which people have enjoyed a common undertaking Has your child ever given you such an opportunity And did you too make the most of it MARIE DAY WEDDED TO CHARLES HOFFMAN quiet senIce at the Methodist parsonage Tuesday united in marriage Miss Marie Day daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles H Day of Humboldt and Gordon Hoff man son of C G Hoffman of Rut land Tho ceremony was read by the Rev J J Share minister of the parish The bridewore a brown crepe frock She was attended by Miss Mildred Hoffman sister of the groom who was attired in blue crepe while Fred Day brother of the bride served as best man Following the ceremony a wed ding dinner was served to a large group of relatives at the home of the brides parents Miss Day has for several years held a position as teacher iu the Southeast Byron school here which position she will hold until March when the couple will locate upon a farm near town SJPROULESMITH and Mrs E W Sproule have announced the mar riage of their daughter Lorna to Dr Clyde H Smith of Iowa City The ceremony took place at Mar engo March 28 1928 and kept a secret until today The bride was graduated from the Humboldt high school and was a law student at Iowa university Dr Smith is a dental student Dr and Mrs Smith will locate at Iowa City after the holiday vacation this country has an automobile only one in 20 possesses abathtub a BALDNESS CAN BE AVOIDED uiiUrg eit western professor reports in alarm The answer of course is easy one cannot ride in a ka Stato Journal FURS For a fur coat of Individuality at a prlco you can pay have your fur coat utado to order at common senso prices style anil beauty built into every coat by experienced furriers und by using the very best ot materials Coats rollncd repaired re styled and remodeled at a sav ing of 20 per cent We trndo and arrange con venient terms Open evenings for your convenience Esti mates given Krueger Fur Shop 639 6th St S K Phono 246RJ Mason City la Quality Stylo and Service at a Reasonable Prlco STYLE SHOPPE STYLE SHOPPE After Christmas SALE Every coat in our store is included in this sale They all must go Among them will be found gorgiously furred coats coats that have snug fitting hiplines flares tucks and the new silhouette effects Come in see these attractive values 100 Hats EACH Values Up To 19 South Federal 100 Hats EACH STORES IN IOWA WISCONSIN ILLINOIS if   

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