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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 19, 1929 - Page 3

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 19, 1929, Mason City, Iowa                                MASUfl CITY ULOBEGAZETTb A Lee Syndicate tvewipaper Issued Every Week Day Afternoon by the MASON CITX GLOBEGAZETTE COMPANY 121123 East Stats CU Telephona Noa 27 28 and 29 WILL F W EARL HALLManaging Editor LEE P LOOMISBusiness Manager OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press Is exclusively entitled to the use for publication of all news dispatches credited to It or not otherwise credited in this paper and also all local news published herein SUBSCRIPTION BATES Dally per yearJ700 per week 13 Outside of Mason City and Clear Lake Dally per year by carrier5700 Daily per week by carrier 15 Daily per year by 400 months 5225 3 months 1 month 60 Outside 100 mile zone daily per year 600 9 months 3 months Entered at the PostofMce at Mason City Iowa as Second Class Matter Procrastination brings loss delay danger Ci MODERN BOOK AGENTS a comfort an honesttogoodness oldfash ioned book agent might he Ultramodern book agents come at you with the kind of approach that keeps you from suspecting they have anything to sell They have chosen you among all men to become the recipient of a free set of books that are being introduced in this new and interesting represent an organization which is restor ing of great Americans They are advance representatives of a national exposition of great edu cational value to the American school boy They are sverythirig in the Known world except book agents Of course before they are thru win their carefully built up patter you discover the book and the hook they have something to sell It is so little each month I that it is indescribably trivial Queer that salesmen and saleswomen as clever as book agents often are do not gratify their prospects once in a while by coming right out and saying I a book to sell The price is neither too low nor too high It is reasonable Here is the book Have a look at it Do youwant it No Very well Such a book agent might not be unwelcome and tie might sell some books Altho even then most fcer 5ons would prefer to buy it from a local book store or procure it from the local library THE OLD HOME TOWN By Stanley WHY NOT QUIT FIGHTING TT IS about time to stop fighting between the two important waterway movements of the middle west Led by the lake states is themovement tor the Great LakesSt Lawrence canal Led by Chi cago and Illinois and joined in by all of the Missis sippi Valley states is the movement for development of the Mississippi and Missouri river waterway For some time past there has been an apparent hostility and jealousy between these two movements and just at the moment it appears that they are becoming so j mutually antagonistic as to be concerning themselves I more with spiking each other than with their own con i struct ve activities The lake states are trying to shut off water di version at Chicago which supplies the water to carry barges down the canal to the Mississippi and the gulf The Illinois people are retaliating by a propaganda designed to show that the Great LakesSt Lawrence is not economically feasible This is a deplorable situation in that the energies which should be directed to constructive effort to put both of thcse matters across as soon as possible are being frittered away in a wordy wrangle that is only waterwaysare vital to the economic development of the middle west Each will be mu tually helpful to the other when they are completed Together they will create an economic crossroads of world affairs which will make this section of the country the most highly developed busy and prosper ous region of any in the world Each is a shortcut certain corners of the world to the farm and y territory of the middlewest And there is not mid not be any conflict between has own territory to serve which affects the other not Vail S Lets Have we served YOU thru our Washington In formation Bureau Send your inquiry to the Globe Gazette Information Bureau Frederic J Raskin Director Washington D C Inclose 3 cents in coin or stamps for return postage together boosting both r f SOME OBSTACLES FOR U S E IM BRIANDS idea tor a United States of a customs union backing up the league of na pions political covenant as near as can be summed vp from vague been accepted in prin ciple by the nations represented at the Geneva meet ing of the league They are all going to take the pro posal back to their governments and are reported in favor of it i But it doesnt follow that the idea has reached anything like approval There are too many compli cations What will governments use for money in those countries dependent upon high tariff walls for revenue in a customs union What will protected in dustries say in countries where they have a nice monopoly on the home market And what about the nationallyorganized government supported cartels or trusts which comprise whole industries and entire supplies of raw materials when being invited to let down the bars in favor of their neighbors There is a movement in Europe for international organization of industry across boundary lines but it is by no means Continental in its scope thus far Until it is big husi vtiess will be pretty sure to spike the United States of Europe idea insofar as possible Which does not mean that M Briands vision will not be realized some day It is too logical for organ ized selfishness to destroy it Its a distant beacon on the horizon now but it burns brightly and will guide the Europeans along its path slowly but steadily THE INACTIVITY ILLUSION of the commonest of illusions in this workaday world 5s the illconsidered belief on the part of the average man that he desires inactivity Men are forever saying to each other that they ue tired of the wear and tear of everyday ihop or office or wherever they may be They suffer from an illusion They just think they want to rest They dont Nothing keeps up the supply of happiness like ac tivity like work You may think you never want to hear the telephone bell ring again You may think you never want to have another caller in your office But silence and Idleness are more terrible than any thing else Try a few days with absolutely nothing to do Yoi will shatter the illusion of the joy of inactivity SPEAKING OF MERGERS talk and much action these days about igl mergers Companies and plants already enormous are made more enormous by a pooling of Interests and central management Now comes Professor Reeves University of Michigan who proposes that the United States enter into an arrangement with all the coun tries of the Carribean sea except Mexico whereby we would guarantee to each a republican form of gov ernment and maintain close enough control to insure stability of that government This sounds almost like Q Whatbecame of the large organ which was at the Sesqulcentennial exposition J O A This magnificent instrument has been installed in the new Ervine auditorium of the University of Pennsylvania Q When was the first nations conference on childrens health held N A H A At the instigation of President Roosevelt in 1909 President Hoover has tJalled the first national conference on the subject to be held since that time This symposium will meet early next year and will as semble federal state municipal and other authorities nterested in child health Q How was it discoxered that the Mediterran ean fruit fly had entered the United States H D I A It is stated that the first warning of this pests entry Into the United States came from Orlando Fla group which included a distinguished entomologist ad obtained some grapefruit from an experimental station It was found that the fruit was dried and riddled with canals Specimens of the fruit were dis patched to Washington for examination An official of the state plant board of Florida obtained specimens of the adult fly sending them by air mail to the U S department of agriculture Here they were identified as the destructive Mediterranean fly and the federal government took precautions at once to restrict and eradicate this insect plague How many books are printed yearly In the United States A Department of commerce figures for 1927 In dicate that in that year 277495544 volumeswere pub lished School books accounted for 83949664 of this number fiction came next with a total of 36553597 Of the remainder were 31047094 juvenile volr umes while religion and philosophy comprised 22220 THE AFTERNOON MAltMISSED THE LATETT9AIN WHEN A JOKER IN THE BARBER SHOP PUT A SHAV1NQ BfcUSH FULL OR LATHER HIS HOUNP DOSS Brown Balks at Subsidy for Chapman Ship Firm It May Mean Curtailment of Building Program but Postal Chief Is More Interested in Deficit i By CHAKLES P STEWART nucleus of the government ASHINGTON undertook to put up 560000000 of Sept u s t it in the form of a loan on easy how much of a terms with up to 20 years to repay present the govthe last of it eminent made to the interests represented h y Inake even a guess at the the financial value of Uncle Sams gift to the house of P W Chapman interests would involve a Chapman Co ot of interest rates can only be estiquestions or deterioration marine nsurance ocean freights mainte nance costs and other details too lechnical for anyone but an expert At all events Chapman Co con sidered it a mighty good bargain We may feel sure of glowing terms employed by the mated Shortly before President Cool idges term ex pired Chapman Go relieved Stories By MARY GRAHAM BONNER 536 Q When were time locks first sold K L M A In 1874 to the First National bank ofMorrison III Q Why is it stated sometimes that George Washington was not born on Feb 22 A He was born before the reform of the calendar and according to the old style of reckoning his birth THE CLOCK TALKS CHE little black clock and the children rode along on the Indians swiftmoving horse After they had traveled over a good deal of prairie land the little black clock whispered to the horse Instantly they stopped and the wind which had seemed so wild before was very quiet The little black clock jumped down and Peggy and John did the same The horse turned back toward home racing for all he was worth What are we going to do asked Peggy jWhy did you let the horse go 1 John asked Ib seemed rather dreadful to be left alone on a great prairie with only the little black clock The legs of the little black clock were not particularly strong looking nor did he look as tho he could do much to help them if danger should come that way The little black clock motioned to each of them to sit down and putting one of his funny hands on each he said Dont be frightened I will never never never let harm come to you We have had so much excitement with the won day was on the llth of February This corresponds I derful dance the Indians gave that I that wed rest here while I tell you just a little more about myself and of all the good times we can have together As John and Peggy looked at the jolly happy friendly face of the clock they knew they need never be frightened again It was long before either of you were born that I stopped going the clock said It was a little before T one evening when I was wishing I could go back to to February 22 in the modern calendar Q What is the name of the poem awarded the Pulitzer Prize In 1928 R D A The epic poem John Browns Body by the young poet Stephen Vincent Beuet won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1928 Q When were oil cooking stoves first used C H P A About 18T5 Earlier types were simply large i a very nice afternoon I had had that I was offered the lamps burning kerosene Q What percentage of automobiles is bought for cash J A The national automobile chamber of commerce gives the following percentages New per cent new per cent used per cent used per cent magic But I had to choose between keeping the regular time or any time at all except the regular time What was the person like who brot you the magic John asked Wont you tell us Peggy added Why will the clock told them another merger with headquarters in the United Add new routes to fame Let yourself get impris oned in a well BOBROADWAY By JOSEPH VAN RAALTE NEW YORK Sept showmanship of Grover Whalen New York police commissioner is shown to advantage at 9 oclock every morning at headquar ters when the police dragnet of the preceding day Is emptied for inspection of local and visiting detectives The show is officially known as The Line Up Ten spotlights flood a narrow stage Below and in com parative darkness sit the plain clotheamen The dep uty chief inspector mounts a small platform and faces the stage He speaks into a microphone his vloce re verberating metallically The lineup suspects are prod ded upon the stage where the deputy chief inspector charges them one by one with present and past dere lictions As a culprit is addressed a detective standing nearby shifts a microphone in front of his face and his words roar mightily thru the room Its an ordeal for a nervous man c IN one block in the 40s on the Western Front there is a theater nine combination speakeasies and room ing houses in a row two of them owned by one pro prietor half a dozen spaghetti joints a nurses home an apartment house owned by Vincent Astor with a playyard for the children of tenants a hotel catering chieflyto single gentlemen and their wives a ware house for movie films half a dozen tenement rookeries not one family in which has fewer than four kids a coal and Ice cellar run by aMafia Wop and a side wheel bootleggiag German grocer with a cockney wife Also there are four parrots 9000 stray cats and an indefinite number of dogs of disturbed ancestry A lodger in one of the rooming houses is the widow of an organ grinder pKORGB PECK the Sage of Grasmere crashed the J Thmkerie the other day to unburden himself of the opinion that cubist art was originated by some drunk who had spent a night on a billiard table ON the wall of the poker room of a swank club in the Park Avenue area there hangs a sign of ornate execution which reads Some people think their troubles are interesting t THERES a blind beggar in New York who must have lost his sight before he had a chance to take up psychologyand hasnt had time to dip Into it since He plies his tin cup on the fringe of the shopping dis trict tapping his dismal course with a nodding head and a bright smile He seldom gets a nickel People dont want their panhandlers to grin The voice with the smile may not back of a boggars cup EARLIER DAYS 1 Diet and Health By Lulu Hunt Pelers M D Address Inquiries to Of care GlobeGazette and enclose stamped selfaddressed envelope Sign your name as of good laiti Send 10 cents in coin if you wtsh Reducing and Giining Pamphlet DR PETERS DISCUSSES ECZEMA HATE to see a baby with eczema come to my clinic Its the most ornery thing we have to treat Some cases will seem to respond to changes in the diet others to external medication and others fail to be re lieved in any case If the eczema does clear up we dont know whether the treatmen we used had any bearing or not fo it seems to clear tip at times of it self This is what a New York chil idreng specialist said tome recently So dpnt be surprised Mrs 1C that the doctors you have see you However you mustnt b discouraged either for not all doc tors are so pessimistic as the one you have seen and the one I quoted In fact Dr Moses Scholtz a skin specialist says that eczema HUNT be cured and that the reason mor PETERS M D Of the doctors do not cure it is tha they do not realize that the causes may be both ex ternal and internal and the treatment must take thi into consideration CAUSES Internal The internal causes may be a sensitization to some protein or a derangement due to an exces of the starches and sugars and sometimes to the fat These overeaters are usually fat and the eczema i of the oozing type External In babies some Irritant such as soaps unclean diapers hot or cold air and winds In adult different materials with which they work The sensitization to some protein of the food maj This uncieaam or tue burden of in the literature it issued In UUIUcLL J1 1 U vw hncf 11 tH investments in the stock of i DGSC JJ or li 11 c ocean liners which remained on his hands corporation which is to operate he Leviathan the 10 gratuitous ships and the additional vessels to ic built later if ever of the merchant fleet built up him during the World They were profitable jt wag unfortunate for 11 They had to be The the Chapman interests that mentsoon found it could not Genera Walter F rid of the vessels it was happened to have been read money on President Coolidge some of this highly optimistic on the plan of putting them on just before he was remind laying basis then disposing of a 2300000 annual mail sub hem Private captains of to run for 10 years or up to jenerally try to keep their total which the Chap layers and unload their white folk have been expecting for jhants Mr Coolidge reversed measure Manciple Brown has also been worrying The folk he sought as a sizable postal deficit willec quickly sensed that he was in him by his predecessor reater hurry to sell than they was an Inopportune moment to my Consequently they did not a further subsidy iberally but President postmaster general pointed tn ook what he could get He Cos literature to hi he shippingtrade a bad thing departments deficit and the government to be in and did balk at considerable sacrifices end CO say they do not see how the interests they rep the 11 ships they can be required to build the from the government the ships they are committed tc man interests agreed to pay threequarters financed by thf imately unless they get tha cash and on time Browns attitude is something It seems like a large To heck with the extr Still one of the 11 ships alone he Leviathan cost about Washington Is betting on 00 to build Doubtless she has or the other on the outcome eriorated somewhat but she Co are much ag be worth yet with at so niggardly a question other 10 liners thrown in of their little item of True the Chapman interests and Postmaster General Brow ised to build worth of evidently never will additional ships to go with their Coolidge i OTHER fr jj jj ARiMISTiCE OR END OF EAT BTJGS Marshalltown New EraNews j Senator Brookhart is to of the trend of the time the Farmers Union On the note of the fact that ing problems of the day of county over on the easte Not on the pressing problem of of the state farmers a ring neck pheasants in or Going buck a few months it to clear their fields of destru be recalled that notice was bugs and worms When asked on Senator Brookhart that he pheasants did not destroy come ancar the union as amount of grain the report counselor and orator of the day told that the birds saved mo was hinted by Miles Reno et al and other grain than they d if Smith came around there by ten fold The sportin ifying theyd show him a who like to kill about ever roughhoiise that would make In sight are loud in their clai ejes bulge out Bold and the beautiful pheasant is or scarred as the colonel was he the most deatructlva birds i around the challenge like a Then too many of the fellow with a fresh sljine walks like to shoot always find th a puddle He did make speeches of pheasants chuck full not to Miles and the while other sportsmen fail t At that incidental period of very much corn And there yo in is also called food allergy SEPT 19 1909 Yesterday was a hoodoo day for the autoists of the city A long list of invalids were hauled into the garages during the day for repairs of more or less serious nature The most serious break was that of the machine of Edwin Lloyd which cracked off a rear axle Among others damaged were A T Lien J E Blythe I W Keerl H D Page and C E Mayne F P French of Osage who arrived here with a Mit chell car broke a coupling and had to leave the ma chine Mr French was to leave for Seattle today but because of the damage to his machine had to post pone his trip for a few days till he could get his auto back home He goes west by train Charles Citys representatives on the diamond scored a signal success last week at the Lnke Mills tournament when theytook Clear Lake Harmony and Humboldt into camp in the order named winning the long end of the money The discovery of an error in the omission of the board of health levy for Mason City of this year has boosted the total tax levy for the coming year 1 13 mills or a total of instead of 36 mills This is the blow that kills father and if there is no kicking when taxes come to be paid the coming year there will be a strange piece of mind come over the people To add to the jump of the city levy for corporation purposes which was 8 miles and the boost of the school levy by 51 a total increase of 131 mills more than last year is found The levy for county and state pur poses has not been changed and remains at 189 mills The Mason City levy which is 762 mills added to this will total 951 mills as against 82 mills of last year The levy is close to 10 per cent or the old fash ioned Jewish tithe Tom Glanville has returned from Chicago where he has been on business for a few days taking advan tage of some choice bargains for his cluster of stores The band which gave another concert last evening was slightly handicapped by other attractions from the crowd standpoint but gave its usual snappy and entertaining program The volume of music showed marked increase over previous concerts which is an other evidence of the proficiency the band is enter taining Professor Keeler and hia musicians will give a series of concerts the coming week incident to the fair and will make a good showing The baseball team from Blue Earth Minn was in the city overnight enroute to Cresco where it plays to day This team has made a good record on the diamond this year or nnaphyLixis or idiosyncrasy It may cause bron chitis asthma hay swelling affects the bronchial and nasal migraine one sided and other In case of eczema in breastfed babies the irritant comes thru the moth ers milk so her diet must be investigated There are protein skin tests which will disclose the offending ones The foods that most often offend are egg whites wheat tomatoes and milk There is a case reported of a baby five months old who suffered from eczema who was not having anything to eat except her milk formula but the skin tests showed a sensitization to wheat protein It was found the milk came from a cow which had a large portion of wheat bran in its feed When milk from cows which were in pasture was used the eczema cleared up You tell me your baby is undernourished Mrs K so evidently she is not having an excess of the starches sugars and fats so perhaps she is sensitive to some protein If this is the case the only way to tell which one is the she can be given the is to take away one food at a time to see if it makes any difference It may be possible she is sensitized to milk as one doctor has told you and if that is so you may have to cut it down to a pint a day or even cut it out entirely Sometimes it is the excess of the offending protein that causes the allergy Then you should make It up by giving the baby some milk mad a of an almond or peanut butter A level tablespoonful the butter with five ounces of water would give a of 100 calories It would give around 15 to 20 calories of protein which would be about the same as you would get in five ounces of skim milk Nut protein is avery good protein The almond has an even higher percentage of lime than does milk and the peanut has about half as much as the milk The chief thing that would be lacking in the nut milks would be vitamin A so she should have some cod liver oil every day Even tho eczema is due to some systemic cause there are local changes in the skin which will persist unless external treatment is also given In the next issue I will tell you about the local treatment of eczema of toral speechifying Brookhart was have two sides to the pheasant for at least problem To the fortysecond gener Messrs Reno and others who asal assembly farmers in the Iowa sume leadership of the union were county presented hills totaling sev for Smith And they regarded the eral thousand dollars for alleged senator as an apostate Called him damage wrought to growing crops it Cast him out into the outer hy these birds and asked the state darkness where no ray of Renoism might fall upon him Yet It appears that the lamps held out to burn and that Brook ran true to form and feather Came the dawn and the awakening Hoover characteristically the senator rose to raise hell with Hoover It seems to have sufficed All seems forgotten and forgiven The old time tenderness revived Arriv ing back from the husks and draff ntid1 suchlike he is seen afar off the robe and the ring come out of cold storage the sound of the cleaver Is heard in the calf pasture The prodigal is back home How sweet a thing it is for breth ren to dwell In unity together now then if only momentarily Is It an armistice or the end of the war And when shall the next war begin with a new gas attack POEMS THAT LIVE O SLEEP Grace Fallow Norton Take me upon thy breast O river of rest Draw me down to thy side Slowmoving tide Carry out beyond reach Of song or of speech This body and soul forespent To thy still continent Where silence hath his home Where I would come Bear me now in thy deep Bosom Sleep O Sleep to remunerate them for the loss Just now farmers in southern lows are receiving large shipments of pheasants and eggs in order to get that section populated with them perfectly willing to take a chance In crop damage BIJFLD THE KOADS FIRST AtlnnUn Neivs Telegraph There are many things which we will have to do in Iowa eventually One of these will be the bqautification of the right of way along our public highways Another will be the wld eningof the roads Just now we are not particularly concerned with eith er but the big job is getting the roads built It would seem the part of wisdom to first pret this done and then consider the others SlODDARD FOK GOVERNOR Siblcy Gazelle Senator Bertel M Stoddard of Wooclbury county is spoken of as a possible candidate for governor of Iowa Senator StoJ dard is an extensive landowner and farmer and is recognized as one of Iowas leading statesmen His splen did executive ability unquestioned integrity and excellent business ca pacity should appeal to lowans gen erally Northwest Iowa need have no hesitancy in indorsing as capable a man for governor A WIDE FIELD Waterloo Trlhune If we are go ing In for investigations because of something a hired lobbyist or ex pert savs or does there is a field Mr Shearer thinks he was Ths errcat organizations of pacifists AT IT IN KAHNEST diaries City Press A 20millton farm marketingcorporation hns been formed in Chicago ready tn begin work on the relief program for grain growers Thus the new farm legislation is having its influ ence in business circles and men nml money will be forthcoming to assist in carrying on lobbying in Washington with helji from all orrr the world and pulling and of about also profess to be tiding tbalf patriotic duly BACK TO STOKM LAKK Boone W Jarnigan is back to work on his Storm Lake Pilot Tribune after several months vacation trylnpr to make the new DCS Moines TteraM go THE EARLY BIRD Albert Lra TribuneAn adequate airport will insure Albert Lea a j berth on the important commcr I cial routes as fast as they are es I tnblished Tts the early bird that apply to 1 catches the worm will this aviation game ONEMINUTE PULPIT Have mercy upon us O Lord have mercy upon us for we are exceedingly filled with contempt Our soul is exceedingly filled with the scorning of those that j are at ease and with the conj tempt of the proud Psalm cxxiii 3 4   

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