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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 7, 1929 - Page 7

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 7, 1929, Mason City, Iowa                                SEPTEMBER 7 1929 MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE SEVEN TOWN Can Be No Greater 1 Than Its Integral Parts 1 Mason City to Be Great Must Have 5 Good Unselfish Citizens BE ONE ftitmmiiiimimiiiiiiiiimimiiiiuimimiiiiiiimmmmii ITHECITY WE LIVE INI WEEKLY Page Devoted to I Community Interests That I i Make for a Bigger and Better 1 MASON CITY niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiniiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiiimimimiimniicS t BANCORPORATiON IDEA MOVE FOR GREATER SAFETY New York Times Writer Gives Analysis of Big Bank Group The following is part of an Interesting analysis of the Northwest Bancorporation and the part such organizations will play in the future development of the country The article by Charles B Cheney appeared In a recent edition of the New York Times Group banking socalled is the new business development in the northwest Chain banking its op ponents term it Under whatever name it goes the new system of bank organization is working econ omic changes already and promises to be highly important and signifi cant Backed by the resources of the three largest banks in the Twin Cities two big holding companies are rapidly drawing within their control many of the strong banks at socalled key points in Minnesota and the two One of them is also reaching into Wisconsin Iowa and Nebraska The rapid these two new organiza tions is challenging attention of the business world in the Northwest is a ruling topic of conversation Key towns which have been grow ing at the expense of country vil lages now find themselves more cosely tied to Minneapolis Their men generally welcome the affiliation of small city banks with v the powerful Twin City units but doubts are raised as to the ultimate effect of the plan There are fears that small towns and small business Men will suffer restriction of credit and that the large units will con centrate their loans more in the Twin Cities Chicago and New York Bearing in mind the competition of chain stores independent bankers are wondering what Is going to hap ycn to them Many of them are try ing to get into the big tents Some are unable because their financial condition is held to be undesirable Others who prefer to keep their are soundingalarms and appealing for support olthe unit banks by their communities Branch Banks Are Banned Branch banking is illegal in any of these states and therefore in not permitted to nationl banks ex cept as they liave been allowed to retain branches in when the McFadden law went into ef fect Under that dispensation the First National and the Northwest ern National the two overshadow ing Minneapolis banks each oper ates three branches in the city Since the ban weVit on they have acquired others thru the stock own ership method the Northwestern listing four and the First Nation a three banks in Minneapolis as affiliated These accretions were the genesis of the group plan The first of the two big holding companies launched was the North west Bancorporation Its key bank is the Northwestern National which with its affiliated units In Minneap olis has resources of Banks in Fargo N Dak and Ma son City were with it in the open ing announcement The plan is a holding company with 575000000 authorized capital which acquires virtually all ofthe stock of each bank taken into the group giving in exchange the stock of the cor poration The key bank is owned by the holding company the same as all the rest Sales of in stock to the public have been au thorized to provide working capital and reserve Already some 30 banks have been acquired and new ones are an nounced every few days It is pre dicted that a hundred or more banks will be absorbed into the group by the end of the year The plan lends itself to aggressive ex pansion tactics Speculation has de i eloped in the holding company stock brot out at 50 and advanced rapidly to 100 then sagging some what Move for llogiilatlon Both state and federal legisla tion will be urged to regulate bank stock holding companies and to re quire them to furnish guarantees of ability to meet stock assessments The Wisconsin legislature the only one in these states meeting in sum mer session is passing a bill re quiring such companies to come un oer state laws and to deposit sccuri ties with the state treasurer to guarantee possible assessments Heads of the holding companies insist that fears expressed toy the critics are groundless F W Decker president of the Northwest Nation al bank and the Northwest Bancor poration says they really acted to prevent large numbers of banks in this region from being acquired by outside interests The Northwest has Its own problems he says which are best understood by North western bankers and business men He also points to the growth ot great business corporations and the necessity for larger bank Institu tions to care for their financial needs The main claim of the group banks to public favor is based on safety for the publics money en trusted to the banks The group of ficials feel that this pooling of bank resources over a wide area with MEET RALPH GEER Has Taught Rudiments of Music to 400 Persons and Played in Several Bands and Orchestras Altho only 28 years of age Ralph B Geer has had the experience of teaching more than 400 persons the rudiments of music as well as tak ing an active part playing in bands and orchestras and directing At thepresent MrGeer teaches every Monday at Thornton where he has approximately 15 pupils in the neighborhood of 16 take lessons at Swaledale where he teaches Tuesday of each week Wednesday he is in Rockwell and has a class of around 18 pupils while the remain der of the has classes in his studio at 330 First street north east His specialties in teaching are piano clarinet saxophone banjo cornet trombone and baritone Born at Rockwell Mr Geer was horn Aug 2 1901 at Rockwell and was graduated from the Rockwell high school in 1920 He immediately entered Mac Pnails school of music at Minneap olis specializing in piano clarinet and voice Upon being graduated from MFO Phails in 1923 Mr Geer enrolled a Hamiltons Business college whore he took shorthand and typewriting During his training there he won the highest award of the L C Smith Typewriting company ALineOPipe By T FIFE Stick to tho plpo Let the smoke blow whcro it will Oh grocry man pray have a heart Oh coal man do the same Arid all the other folk who have Upon their books our name Now wont you for a month or so Porget our bill somehow For are badly bent and broke Weve got a new car now Buying a new car is quite an ex perience Especially for us common epple who enjoy the privilege about once every four or five years Making the final decision is hard o do By the time the effeclent automobile salesmen have enumer ated the superior qualities of the foods they represent ones head is retty niucn in a whirl And by the ime one gets the new carpaid tor if ever one ia so dizzy than one thinks every man one sees s a bill collector RALPH B GEER writing 70 words a minute He then launchedon his steady teaching ca reer in which with the exception of an interruption or two for other work he has been engaged since In 1925Mr Geerwas chosen a member of the orchestra of Miss Zea Haynes which went to the west coast playing on the way and a number of otherengage ments in California IsFourth Season This is the fourth season Mr Geer has been with theMason City mu nicipal band playing clarinet and saxophone He played in the Rock well band two seasons and direct ed one year During the school year of 192829 he directed an orches tra at Swaledale made up bis pupils This fall he will have cliarge of the glee club and orchestra in the Swaledale school He presented bis music pupils in recitals and has about three annually Geer believes that children should start taking music lessons at a young age He believes that thj average boy or girl can commence when 6 years old And he feels that most child will like to take lessons if properly handled It is not necessary to have special talent in order to learn toplay an instru ment proficiently Mr Geer says Parents he added should not substitute the radio and phono graph for the musical education of their children Mr Geer has a number of hob bles Since his boyhood he has been interested in pets such as cats dogs and pigeons He likes mechan ics and enjoys tinkering with an amateur radio and has built several sets He also likes to work in his garden JuneO 3926 Mr Geer was mar ried to Miss RuthNelsonof Rock well Oh see the happy children Do not their faces beam with joy and delight Hear their merry laugh er See how they hop and skip in heir eagerness to be on their way And why are all the children so happy and gay It is because the sumrner vaca Ion is over and they must now re urn to school once more See how slowly they hasten Scarcely can hey wait until they are once more at their desks Happy happy hildren VIEW OF F WBUCHE GAKDEN At the home of F W Buche 1026 north Jefferson may be found a real garden wall garden Here is a rustic wall of softly shaded grey limestone with joyous hollyhocks growing in front of it and vines clambering over it Near the wall is the lovely little pool shown In the accompanying picture which also shows a glimpse of the wall The marginof the pool is ar tistically planted and in the pool cattails and arrowheads are grow ing in a double jar of Interesting shape This jar was made by Mr Buche of cement in which is set bright colored stones gathered on a trip in the Black Hills Indeed both wall and pool arc the work of Mr Buche constructed in spare hours This garden has the atmosphere of a spot which is lived In as well as worked in it is plainly a place where the family finds rest and rec reation In a cool vinecovered ar bor benches and take speak of tc lightful hours Near by a trellis now bearing a dainty climbing bleeding heart vine was earlier in the summer banked with peas and there are yet gay flowers nbdding here and there among the shrubs which surround the garden Cut Flowers Shown At the fair the past week one ex hibit which proved to be of special interest to garden lovers was the booth of cut flowers culled from the gardens of the county and pre sided over by Mrs Brims Here were so many flowers attractively ar ranged that it seemed every kind and variety of garden flower of this season of the year was present Here were lovely asters great fluffy ones and nlso the daioty single China astqrn which look al I most like pyrethrums giant dahlia The automobile men whom we came In contact were real salesmen They pleaded the superiority of their car and but few ungentlemanly re marks regarding other makes What they thot of other cars might be something else again but whatever it was hero ically refrained from giving It utterance Citys New Fire Truck Example of Fighting Machine Oh just see the happy children How they hasten onward slow They must hurry to the school house Cause they all do love it so YOU CERTAINLY HAVE T Pipe For a year I have bean trying to write the weeks worst joke At last I have succeeded Here it is Why is an Indian like a mar ried man An Indian likes to smoke a pipe of peace A married man likes to smoke a pipe in peace Willie Shame on you Mr Eye to let this man Johnson cram a lot of bunk down your throat and maku you like it There is a vast difference be tween running a train nt from SO to il miles an hour out in the country and in operating it over our city streets at a reduced speed as required by city ordinance Tho M C C L railway runs passenger and freight trains on Federal ave nue but they do not find it neces sary to fill the ambient atmosphere Most Modern Fire Has 108 Horsepower Engine and 600 Gallon Pump Engine The new 512000 AhreusFox truck which arrived here last Tues day and successfully completed its underwriter tests Wednesday is an example of the most fighting equipment made according ts Fire Chief Daniel Shire The ma chine Is a special model the Quad ruple or FourinOne that is it combines a pumping engine book and ladder hose cart and chemical engine The apparatus was built to meet requirements submitted by Chief Shire and was designed in accordance with his specifications by the AhrensFox company at Cin natl Ohio The ttuck boasts a 600 gallon pumping engine which is run by the motor proper of the machine the transmission running thru the water pump being utilized for this power Pressure up to 250 pounds and more in reserve can be called upon to send water higher than any building now in Mason City A 3D gallon gasoline tank set near the drivers seat allows a five or sis hour pumping time while fighting a fire Dual Ignition Hose Is carried by the new ma chine up to 100 feet in the Inch size 400 feet in the 1A inch thick ness and 200 feet in the one inch tubing An 80 gallon booster water tank for emergency use is ready for instant service should the hyrants fail The truck is powered by a 108 horsepower WalkerShaw motor the only part of the entire truck which is not manufactured by titc AhrensFox firm The engine driven the pump and propells the truck for road work A dual ignition syatem will permit one system to fail while the other will operate in emergency Included in the accessories of the apparatus are two inch nozzles two inch nozzles 1 booster hose noszle one Grant multiversal nozzle from which four 2V4 inch lines are led into one and used as a turret pipe 1 Baker cellar pipe four axes two crowbars five lifebelts five j small handaxes door openers on3 sledge one Volslta bar cutter for heavy pipe cutting one electric wire cutter six Burrell allservice gns masks of the type used by the Bu reau of Mines two electric hand lau terns one claw tool two pitchforks two shovels six hose and ladder straps Chicago type and six under writers salvage covers for protec ting property from water damage and a large anyfocus spotlight throwing a wide beam at any angle Special compartments for brooms mops squegees and other salvage equipment are situated near the rear fenders Crew of Five Mcn The truck measures 35 feet over all and has a 251 inch wheelbase It is mounted on pneumatic tires with puncture proof tubes It is the first piece of fire apparatusin Ma by Kirk TESTING NEW FIRE DEPARTMENT TRUCK Win 4H Contest at Fair 1 flowered zinnias measuring foul and five inches across vied with their bright little Liliputian sisters whose vivid heads are hardly big ger than a red clover blossom Here also were the great ff dahlias and the dainty little pom pom dahlias which are so attractive in bouquets being not more than ar inch or two across Coxcomb ant marigold snapdragon and mourn ingbride pansies and bachelor but tons gladiolus and cosmos all liac their place And finally there was a jar of big double sunflowers which looked like plump pin cushions stuck full of sunbeams Artistically Arranged The flowers were all artistically arranged in vases best suited lo each style of beauty or for some particular purpose in decoration Mrs Buehlers arrangement of water lilies attracted particular at tention The lilies were from tho Buchler pool on South Virginia one of the pools visited on a recent gar den tour conducted by the Outdoor Life department of the Womans club The HHes were arranged in three bowls at different elevations the lower two broad and shallow and looking like miniature pools in which floated the lilies and lily pads and the upper bowl containing several long stemmed more erect growing Javendar lilies and a stalk of Indian paperplant an aquatic also from the Bcuhler pools And speaking of lilies Mrs Hel ene Brims Sixth street southeast has had two lovely Auratum lilies in bloom in her parden Oun standing abnut three feet high lijre 16 lilies and another stalk slightly shortar bore five Those bulbs were purchased last year at a local store for 10 cents apiece But everything grows its best for Mrs Brans with shrill blasts of the whistle at son City to carry a high windshield pach street crossing Come down I to protect the men from the off tho telegraph pole ami show weather this chap you ore no quitter delivery engineer of the com pany John Edmundson Chicago has been in the city since Tuesday supervising the tests and break ing in the men to handling the new machine The truck will carry a regular crew of five men Two drivers will be trained on each shift night and day to handle the truck In its tests before H J Corcoran chief engineer of the Iowa Insur ance Service company Wednesday the new motor dreadnaught easily met every requirement under the underwriters specifications and showed a tremendous amount of re serve strength beyond the teat limit NO ENVELOPES TO BE LOCAL OFFICIALS Department at Washington Issues Warning to Illegal Mailers Local postoffice officials call tUa attention of the public to the fol lowing bulletin issued by the office of F A Tilton third assistant post master general Washington Reports arc being received by the department that some persons are attaching business reply cards and envelopes to parcels of third and four class matter The law embodied in section Postal Laws and Regulations does not contemplate that business reply cards and envelopes shall be attached to parcels of merchandise either for the purpose of carrying messages or merely as address tags or labels Their use in such a man ner without prepayment of the re quired postage causes confusion and places nn unwarranted burden on the service in handling the mah ter and collecting the postage due thereon Patrons presenting parcels of merchanise to which are attached communications inclosed inbusiness reply envelopes not bearing there quired amount of postage should rie advised that such envelopes niay not be used in this manner and should be requested to detach them from the parcels and mail them separ ately or to affix postage at the first rate class to the envelopes However the attaching of let ters in the business reply envelopes to parcels even tho postage at he first class rate Is prepaid on such letters is objectionable and patrons should be advised that when it Is desired to send a communication with a parcel It should be placed in an ordinary envelope prepaid nt the first class rate and attached to the parcel as prescribed by section Postal Laws and Regulations v Patrons would also be advistMt that the use of business reply cards and envelopes as address tags or labels tfor parcels is not permissible All postmasters are requested to take the necessary measures to pre vent the acceptance and dispatchof parcelsto which letters Inclosedin tho business reply envelopes are at tached without prepayment of the required postage or which have bus iness reply cards or envelopes used aa address labels or address tags Care should be taken according to local representatives of the post office not to include letters notes or written material such as mag azines etc In laundry bags parcels suitcases and like receptacles or the patron will be required to pay full first class rate on the entire parcel THE HOME AUTOMOBILE BUYERS OWN GUIDE Tho Whippet The Whippet ia a sturdy car And in it one may travel far But neer so far it journeys quite But what it brings one home all right The new superior Whippet isthe style creation of master designers It Is the mechanical triumph of leading engineers We copy this in formation from descriptive litera ture we have at hand And Lewis Sedlacek MrHalhorns star sales man readily admits the truth of this assertion In fact he readily admiU the truth of any assertion that asserts any superiority of the new superior Whippet And because Mr Sedlacek knows more about it than we do we shall quote him in giving our readers a description of this popular car The Whippet says Lewis a car that runs today when you want it to run and not tomorrow maybe when you dont even know if you will want to run it It has a seven bearing crank case and a button onthe steering wheel with moro responsibility than a dozen trou buttons It is a car that Fhoull be in the garage of every American citizen And the best of it is he concluded you do not have to whip it to make It go And now dear reader you are In formed about the Whippet auto mobile Ierlmps T Pipe Perhaps the reason wrist watches are so popular with our flapper is because they really do want to wear something The most of them would take colti without them Two Shot in Lov ieadline Bc Fall Term Opens at Hamiltons With Large Enrollment After 10 days vacation during which the entire building occupied by Hamiltons college was redeco rated some departments enlarged and other improvements made thn largest class of beginning students was enrolled In the history of tho college Mra Howard Skellcnger formerly Florence Porter has been engaged to assist in the commercial depart ment in addition to the regular members of the faculty The employment department re ports placing Edward Immerfall and Theodore De Buhr in positions in the First National bank Miss Hazel Collins of the class of 1920 who is employed as privata secretary to the president of Lake Forest college Lake Forest 111 mado a call at the college office this week Miss Lulu Dvorak of the class of 1920 who holds a position in De Molnes was a caller thin week The membersof Ihe faculty will liy Kirk Above urn Anna Baler anil Marlon Snoiv of township as tliey appeared giving their demonstration at lie North Imva fair They won first pluco in n competition of cieit counties Jn the 4H looil demonstration contest Their project was on jelly making This tnum will represent Cerro Gonlo county nt he national cattle con gross in Waterloo this full Scanning New BYRD EXPEDITION HAS VARIETY OF READING Mrs George Penson brot into the library a thrilling article entitled BllzzardBesetByrdites Revel in Bookish Feast It was clipped from a newspaper and was written by Russell Owen According to this acfcount dated Aug 9 even the chief gets popeyed over detective yarns as the varied library ends the ennui of the Ice Way down in Antarctia on Little America according to the account the library Is becoming well thumb ed as the period of hibernation draws to a close Has 1200 Volumes The library contains 1200 volumes There are several hundred volumes nf fiction an evtenslve polar library somo of the classics in standard English literature and translations from other languages History travel biography poetry essays nnd plays of course have a placa and there ia even some philosophy and psychology Longer books are read than at home according to Mr Owen There is more leisure Forsyte Saga finds many readers he says The most widely read author is probably Donn Byrne altho Joseph C Lincoln an odd contrast runs him a close second Byrnds poetic fancy seems to strike a re sponsive chord in moat everyone here And Lincolns stories of Cape Cod with their atmosphere of quaint people and comfortable homes makes us homesick Conrad is rend 1 great deal and so are Mark Twain and Booth Tarklngtqn We all get the detectivestory fever and rummage thru the shelves In the hope of finding a new one lust now Larry Gould is going thru a spell of criminal hunting as an antidote to his usual diet of poetry Shakespeare the Bible and books like Green Mansions Messr Marco Polo and the Crock of Gold by James Stephens Incidentally the reception of the Crock of Goid is one of the most interesting studies down here No body just likes it They either rave aboutIt or dont likeit at all And for some it Is a neverfalling de light Few Read Kipling Another odd thing is that so read Kipling or Dickens altho we have nn excellent set of each It is probably because so many already have read both so often But that tinnot be the only reason The set of Harvard classics is used a great deal and for somu reason a set of Modern Eloquence volumes containing modern speeches has appealed to some very much And the Encyclopedia Brlttanlca pnd the World Almanac bear the marks of hard usage That Encyclopedia exercised a curious fascination on a few when it first was opened and one man rashly stated that he was going to read it all thru He started but didnt gt far ing shot in theloop is a very scrl bj entertained by Mr and Mrs IV ous matter and should be avoided as much as possible business supervision of each local bank reduces the chances of Iocs to an absolute minimum group organizations give the north west more financial more n i drpenclfence and better credit facill It nlso is sot forth that these I tics for tho industries of tho region Dirt you notice Ihn Mexican limplno beans in the window of the Auto Supplv company on Ftrst strppt S W They hop around like n flock of coch ronrlics on n hot skillet Assignment of Cases Made by Judge Kelley The following cases have been nottid for trlnl by Judge C H Kcl the district court Annie Bell vs Herbert Bell Sept 9 Con Ind school district Thorn ion Con Ind school district distance and were ijpable to make SwAledalc Sept 10 Tuhl et al VP arrangements to start earlier Weber et al Sept 11 Fortune et al R Hamilton at their home at 823 North Jefferson avenue at a dinner complimentary to rMs How ard Skellenger A large group of students have made arrangements to enroll at th college Monday A number of students come from a considerable vs Kloslor Sept 11 The following arc NEW AUTOMOBILES REGISTERED HERE DURING PAST WEEK Swartz 17 Fifth street northeast Ford town sedan R Woodford Clear Lake Bulck coupe Mitchell 319 West State street Chevrolet coupe and Kossack 618 South Federal avenue Ford G Gaspers OH2 Sixth street southeast Ford tudot D Alitz Mason City Chevrolet sedan Bonner Swals dale Chevrolet coach ZZ G Everding Earl mar hotel Ford tudor H LeiboUI South Adams avenue Graham Page Stlnlker Whtp pet A Cahill K F Mason City Ford tudor i and Mrs RayC Hemming Thornton Stuclebakeifr sedan Servison 320 South Polk avenue Dodge McClouL ford Nash four door aetlnn A Hanley R F D No 5 Chevrolet coach E DeWitt 412 First street northwest Essex sedan Motor com pany Clear Lake Ford cab F C Bush deaf Lake Graham Paige sedan A Barnett South Washington avenue Cheviot let sedan E Reisus 144 Tenth street northwest Bulck sedan E Sawyer Thorn ton Ford fordor Lambert Pals Sr Meservey Chevrolet coach M3 H W Letzring Rockwell Chevrolet coach McCoy 12 M B A Chrysler sedan Fruit com pany DC Snlo P Kclley Dough vs Bokelman ct al Sept 11 Turner crty Ford coupe jury M10208George F Probato Groom vs Gillian estate207 Seventh street northwest Over Sept 16 Gruetzmaciier vs Quevll Sept 1C Chirbb vs McAuley et al Sept 18 Andrew vs Qucvli Sept 18 Dixson vs Bchm Sept 18 Gage va Wolf Brosyet al Sept 18 Ett liert vs Moon et al Sent 19 lohn tnn vs Bovinp Sept 19 Falrlis vs City of Mason City ct al Sept IS SicRseger vs Puih Sept o laud M10211 P Enabnitt Thornton Chevrolet coupe Conrin Rockwell Ford coupe Gertrude Clear Lake M1021P Chris Shcppclman Ven tura Whippet coupe   

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