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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 23, 1929, Mason City, Iowa                                v viv MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE A Lee Syndicate Newspaper Office 121123 East State Street Telephone Numbers 27 28 and 29 WILLF MUSEEditor VY EARL HALLManaging LEE P LOOMIS Business Manager CERKO GOKDO COUNTS REPUBLICAN Established 1861 Weekly Globe Established May 1882 Daily Globe Established October 1890 The Mason City Times Founded In 1870 Issued Every Week Day Afternoon by MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE COMPANY MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press exclusively entitled to the use ifor publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited inthis paper and also all local I news published herein Official Paper in the City and County SUBSCRIPTION RATES Daily per year IDaily per Outside of Mason City and Clear Lako per year by Daily per week by carrierla Daily per year by mail400 months 3 months 1 montho Dutslde 100 mile zone daily per year600 months 3 months Advertising Rates Furnished on Application at the Postofflce at Mason City Iowa as Second Class Matter A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full i description of a happy state in this world HOOVER ASKS FOR UNITY JrjRESIDENT HOOVER will have the backing of a large percentage of from the pro I sslonal his admonition for united action the past the principal obstacle to agricultural ala om the government has rested in the fact that every ganlzat ion seemed to have abrand of relief all its no two alike and some of them diametrically Jtposlte The representative or senator who had no isthuslasm for farm relief anyway could go to one of IB farm lobbyists and get an adverse opinion on any roposal that was under consideration Even congress len with a sincere desire to remedy agricultural con Itions have found themselves befuddled In their at laipt to settle ona specific plan H Obviously concerned over the tendency of the pro lisiQual relievers to belittle his own no jier reason than because it differed from their own president gave expression to these aightfromtheshoulder sentirrients 1 regret to see that some farm organizations s again divided on measures of agricultural re lief One primary difficulty in the whole of this list eight years has been the conflict in point of I Jew in the ranks of the agricultural orgahiza yons and the farmers themselves k A definite plan of principles for farm relief adopted republican convention at Kan the plan of the party it was not L1ttheplan of any individual orgroup nted an effort to get together and obtain damental beginnings and necessitated the itding of views by all ofus it was supported by elements of the party in the campaign and ion it we have a clear mandate Without enteringinto the merits or demerits any other suggestion at the present time I con eplore that divisions in the ranks of the farmers emselves encourage those who oppose all farm ilief and can at best only bring great delays and nger of entire failure If after eight years of agitation and debate a matter BO vital to a large part of our people to succeed In putting1 the question out of tics and on the way to solution under economife jtdance we have need of unity in the ranks of farmers themselves and the different groups reflect their views in congress No great in public action can ever succeed without e compromise of view and some sacrifice of Ion ong the lowans active In farm legislation ac the tendency was to accept the Hoover plan instructive measure There were two notable however Milo Reno and Senator Brook no who had turned against Hoover before the j expressed the view that the proposal was Brookhart criticized it in more temperate ririncipal difference between the Hoovers and with respect toagricultural aid is that the jjVOuld rather have the best bill it is possible rind pass whereas the Renos prefer to go down for an unattainable ideal Thats just what interests have for the past eight S have been led at Washington by a group Inwilling to yield an inch It may be a little Bourse to allude to it but it Is an inescapable Son that delay in obtaining farm relief ex a good Job for the professional relievers it no progress has been made toward a broad Itive program of legislative assistance Pres jjver has made such a start only to find the jmy out in full armor to block the path True farming will hope that hesucceeds with the jhods he Is pursuing in routing the men who interested in bread and butter for thera they are in Improvlpg farm conditions REFUSED TO BE COWED JSIDENT HOOVER is being cowed by the I tactics employed by wet newspapers in jiultg on him he had a peculiarly effective jjnceallng the fact in hisaddress Monday be Jpubllshers of the country in session at New reiterated in terms that cant be mlsunder contention that respect for law is a primal in this country and that there is no defense Newspaper or the individual which seeks to de Ihose laws to be obeyed and those to be dls j powers behind a certain Chicago paper were ildlence when the president said I have seen jts published within a few days encouraging defy a law because that particular Journal Approve of the law itself I leave comment on toany citizen with a sense of re ity to his country its a safe guess they felt tle bit uncomfortable jloover said nothing Monday that wasnt in accord with his campaign addresses But for his position in the face of powerful tlc opposition Is to reveal a fearlessness re l to lawabiding Americana WILL YOU DO YOUR PART this week to raise the large amount of 1 money necessary to send the Mason City high school musical organizations to the state contest at Iowa City should meet with a generous response Probably no other city in the state will be 03 largely represented Mason Citys showing at the district con test at Ames was nothing short of phenomenal Mason City is sure lo make an excellent showing in the state contest Here is our opportunity to show the state that Mason City in its attention to the industries wherein we lead the state is not neglecting the finer things of lifo such as music Sendingthe musicians to Iowa City is a community enterprise Kverybody who can should help POPULATION AND DIVORCE A LTHO divorce is on the increase in Canada that country still has the lowest divorce rate among civilized in every 111 marriages Di vorce seems to increase rapidly in themore thickly populated lands or in the thickly populated parts of the United States Domestic life does not seem to go so well in big cities as in little People to be at their best need room Scientific farming is the kind best carried on in the agricultural magazines THREE THE OLD HOME TOWN By Stanley Take advantage of this free service If you have never used the service begin now It is maintained for your benefit Be sure to send your name and address with your question and inclose 2 cents In coin or stamps for return postage Address the GlobeGazette Information Bureau Frederic J Has kin Director Washington D C Q Can anyone learn to fly jm airplane J 10 P A One has to have a sense of balance perception of depth and accurate judgment of distance Also one has to have the mental capacity as well as the physical capacity for flying In the government flying school one is not allowed to enter without two years of college work to his credit Q How many telegrams were sent as Mothers day messages last year D A H A The telegram and cable companies were unable o give us the number of Mothers day messages since heir daily reports are made up to show the monetary ralue of business instead of quantity However the Mothers day telegrams for 1928 were 39 per cent higher than for 1927 Foreign cables Increased 29 per cent in 1928 over 1927 Q Where was the first juvenile court in the United States established R T G A It was established on April 21 1899 in Cook county Illinois byvact of the Illinois legislature Q Will you please tell me the following things about the three famous stars Tom Mix Hoot Gib son Ken Maynard Where were they born How old are they What nationality are they Are they married ana U so how many children J S A Tom Mix was born at Mix Run Pa He Is 5 eet 10 inches tall and weighs 165 pounds He has dark lair and eyes He is married and has two daughters and Thomaslna Hoot Gibson was born at Tekamah Nebr in 1892 Height 5 feet 10 incnes weight 160 pounds light hair md blue eyesk He was married to Helen Johnson in 1921 and has a 5 year old daughter Lois He is now divorced Ken Maynard was bora in Mission Texas July 21 1895 He has dark hair grey eyes and weighs 180 jounds Q What is the earliest age a person may be immunized against typhoid fever 7 A R E A Any time after the third month Q Why is the war in which Jeanne dArc fought called a war of youth B S A At the time of the siege of Orleans Charles VII was only 25 Jeanne 18 the Due dAlencon 19 Du nois 25 the Sire de Rais 24 and Xaintrailles 23 The eldest Was La Hire who was 38 Q Do articles made of rubber have longer Jives now than formerly M L A Yes QIs platinum much more valuable than gold C E M A It is now more than three times as valuable as gold the price being around an ounce Q When was Montreal founded H W A It was founded May 17 1642 Your BROADWAY By Walter Winchell And Mine STATKPW AGENT PADKEYES STOOD OUT ON THE DEPOT PLATFORM THAT FAST FAN OUT KtS WHISKERS BUT HAPPENED OUTSIDE OF LOSING TWO BUTTONS OFF His COAT ANC THE OF SOME EMPTY MILK CANS ToMoeraovs uea vv STEP ON IT Cartoonist Stanley offeri a handpainted red Tolling pin to tKe reader sending in the bcit tuggeitum by May lit not to exceed 100 wordi on how to restore Dad whiikera to their original beauty Addrem Car loom it Stanley care paper Write nowt Diet and Health By Lulu Hunt Fetera II D Address inquiries lo Dr Peters care GlobeGazdte enclose stamped envelope Sign your name as evidence of Kood Taith Send 10 cents in cola if you wish Reducing ant Gaining Iamphlet EW YORK April probably heard of the Lucy Stone League that organization of women who never lose their identity and retain their maiden names after they wed Well Doris Fleischman is a Lucy Stoner and so Is Ruth Hale the latter never permitting anyone to call her Mrs Heywood Broun Doris Fleischman is Mrs Edward L Bernays and recently a baby girl was born to them upat Lippincotts Sanitarium a very tony hospital Our Blessed Event operative at that place nowinforms us that there was great excitement besides the arrival of the baby because Mrs Bernays ab solutely refused to register under her marriage tag when she entered the hospital and the hospital authorities argued that it was embarrassing to them to have to announce that a child had been born to a Miss Doris Fleischman AMONG other rewards for licking Mabel Walker Willebrandt Texas Guinan received a handsome sum of coin for a cigaret testimonial It will shortly appear all over the country and will be a composite photo revealing the prosecutor shaking a threatening finger at Miss Guinan on the witness stand What is your definition of a sucker he will be saying A sucker Miss Guinan will retort Is a guy who doesnt smoke SoandSos Incidentally a simile that all of us muffed after her trial was Prosecutor Morrisons who Is supposed to have groaned She is as hard to rattle as a feather pillow ELCEY ALLEN the dramatic critic has never en joyed the distinction of a bawling out by a theatri cal producer over his notices In fact Allen is the most popular drama reviewer with New York managers But recently Mrs Allen who accompanies him to all the first nights received a phone call from the press agent of a mighty producer who advertises heavily She told the caller her husband was not at home We cant understand it growled the exploiter Mr Allen had the nerve to leave the theater during the nhow last night You must excuse him was the Innocent reply he1 walks in bis sleep FROM Don Roberts the actor comes the report that things are so tough on Broadway the acrobats are sleepingfour high Then theres Sidney Skolskys mer ciless squelch A columnist feels as old as his latest gag J CALORIES AND VITAMINS N AN editorial headed Are Calories to Suffer Fate of A1V HasBeens written in a California news paper last year the writer commenting on the dis covery of new vitamins says But in our enthusiasm over the vitamins let us not forget the unfortunate calories Not so long ago they were the whole cheese Came the vita min and the calorie was out of a job More vitamins The unemploy ment rate among calories has grown to be something frightful Nobody ever grives them a thot Their old friends might agitate for an employment dole or at least es tablish a home for Indigent calor ies They were faihful servitors as long as they had a Job and they helped expand many a waistband They deserve something better than utter neglect Yes indeed the calories deserve LULU HUNT something better than utter neg PETERS M D lect and Im surprised that an edi torial writer should neglect them so much that he doesnt even know the meaning of the word The calorie Is simply a scientific unit used to mesure the energy and heat producing value of foods and it has no connection whatever with the vitamins which are inherent principles of the food and cannot be measured by calories for there Is no relationship between them In the first place the vitamins havent ieen isolated and in the second place it is not their unction to produce energy or heat except in a round about way in promoting general well being No indeed the calorie is not nor will it ever be a hasbeen unless some other unit to measure the energy and heating value of foods is found which serves the purpose better This editorial writer is also mistaken in thinking that everybody Is forgetting about the calorie The overwelghters the undenveight ers and the diabetics and others who have to know something of the energy and heating values of their foods are using the knowledge of calories every day And getting results too It is only in unscientific fooc literature that you read such au article as the one quoted Vive ID Calorique M Peters Adventures A Daily Bedtime Story By FLOKENOB SMITH VINCENT THE BROTHER WHO STAYED AT HOME Teapot Dome Penalties Too Light Says Walsh Punishment Doesnt Balance With Offendings Mon Ttfrt L tana U S Senator Insists By CHARLES P STEWART ASHINGTON April F Sinclairs 90 days in jail and fine are not the total of all the penalties al ready paid or yet to be paid for their buccaneer ing by the oil marauders of Tea pot Dome Elk Hiils Exposure and ob Henry M Blackmer No doubt exile is unpleasant to him I un derstand he would like to return to America Yet I hardly think the danger of nothing worse than prosperous exile will prove a deterrent in future to others who situated as he wan are empted to imitate him Even Sinclair never was found fullty of oil frauds but only of con enipt of the senate in refusing to answer questions put to him AND the public Have the oil ONE of Gobblers wives gave a her husbands words scornful cluck at Of course that wicked traitor was leading you 0 market where you would have lost your foolish lead Anyone but your silly self would have guessed hat at once husband And it would have served you right too for running away from home Now if you lad stayed in the barnyard and minded your own business you would be fine and plump instead of lean and scrawny as you arexnow You should have seen your brother During you absence he grew much better Looking than you ever were so fat you would never have known him Here Mrs Gobbler caught her breath gave a littl gasp and stopped talking The other Turkeys looked a her curiously Now you mention him wife I remember I haven1 seen brother since I came back Where Is he anyhow 1 should think if he heard my voice he would come running from the farthest part of the barnyard Gobbler looked curiously about Mrs Gobbler shook her head and said mournfully Your brother will never again come running to greet you or anyone else Why not Where is he demanded Gobbler lancing from one of his family to the other and shak ng his wattles fiercely Hurry up and tell me before lose my temper at your being so slow with your loquy anxiety The loss of their loot and the enormous ex pense of their de fense Expulsion from LINCOLN MfMGRML a lucrative and honorable business post in one case Robert W Stewarts Exile in a M Blackmers The disgrace of even a short term be hind the bars in a clairs These things count too Add up the items Then set the totaldown opposite the sum the gangs offendings Is theaccount balanced SEN THOMAS J WALSH of Mon tana inspiration of the oil In vestigation for seven hardfought years pondered this question during a long1 minute Then he answered No Would a petty bank official con victed of a shortage of a few thou sands escape with a threemonth sentence and a small fine He might feel his disgrace just as acutely as these men He would be a prey to the same anxiety His legal expenses probably would ruin him But he could not hope for less than a term of years in prison We must consider the defendants In the oil cases exactly as if they had been persons of no means OOBERT W STEWART con Av tinued the senator He lost Is chairmanship of tha Standard Oil company of Indiana yes But required all the power of the lockefeller millions to take it from im But for that powers exercise tha ompanys shareholders inevitably would have been swayed by the logic of his high dividends cases read any lesson to the n people generally I have repeatedly heard it as serted replied Senator Walsh that a man with Sinclairs millions never could be sent to prison I hear It asserted even yet Of course this is a very bad rame of mind for the country to he n I believe Sinclairs actual im prisonment will tend to improve it Nevertheless I have beenkeenly disappointed thruout by the failure of officials in high places to express thhorrence of the conditions which the oil investigation revealed True the president did speak of corruption in office and the necessity or punishing it but only in general erms Otherwise or from any other s mllar source not a word It seems to me that such an pearance of indifference on the part f those whom it would be natural o suppose would be most concerned must lead to the popular conclusion 71 that they did not regard such a state of affairs very seriously How then were convictions rea sonably to have been expected from juries the oil scandals at least v have the effect of making predatory interests more careful for a long time to come On tills point the Montana senator was more hopeful The civil suits growing out of the oil cases he said appear to me to I nave terminated quite satisfactorily The government has recovered its property with compensation from he Individuals who had acquired it wrongfully Instead of profit they reaped losses Their plans final failure may dis courage others But the outcome of the criminal miscarriage of justice xiriLt W ha 1 OTHER EDITORS v vr THE rncl of five years iaftier thana Wor each placeFew if the salaries de Fort 1 Attend on the volume of business when a were of a We dont quite know what has happened to your Brother replied Mrs Gobbler backing away from her impatient husband All we are sure of Is that in the morning he was strutting around in the barnyard as nale and hearty as any well fed Turkey can be and when night came he had gone Where That is for you to guess Only one thing we can say and that is hat he didnt run away He was carried off Next Gone But Not Forgotten EARLIER DAYS APRIL 23 1909 Mr and Mrs Ray Prusla arrived home last eve ning from Cherokee where they have been on their honeymoon since their marriage in Des Molnes This evening friends here will go in a body to their home on Madison street and give them a proper welcome home selfpropel US tip anikarriage Carl Benz thru the sn vehicle plunlch Its mo tive power fished by a single horizontal cylin waterjacketed Y HANDS have always perspired very much The perspiration just rolls off my hands like water and I cant touch anything without marking it Have often had opportunities for different positions but couldnt accept on account of this handicap MRS H In the same mail with Mrs Hs letter is one from Mrs A who is a dressmaker and who is afflicted simi larly and so severely that she cannot work on silks or light materials without spotting Just why there should be this excessive perspira tion on the hands or other places where the sweat pores are not usually so active is not known There Is probably some connection with the nervous system or else some disturbance of the internal secretions of the ductless glands altho apparently normal people do suffer from this trouble If the ordinary astringents are not helpful and the conditions hampers you in your work you might see a skin specialist and perhaps he will recommend the use of the Xrays That seems to be the quietus on the overactivity of the sweat glands Some good astringent solutions are One ounce of liquid formalin to the quart of water or a 25 per cent solution of aluminum chloride Wash and dry hands before applying a little of either solution Do this every day for a week or so then twice a week and thereafter as often as seems to be necessary Next Sweets and Clparets The T P A delegates to the state convention of that order who go pledged to bring back with them the state headquarters for the coming two years leave tonight for Burlington over the Northwestern The party will consist of J W Adams C C Barrett A A Arnold F E Ramey S P Shilling J E Decker C J Winter P A Redfern Ira Knapp G E Bowen F S KIngsbury H D Reynolds H C Stearns A F Shotts George Feldman and J M Taylor The regular meeting of the G A R post will be aeld tonight Business of importance will take place Including action for the encampment at Fort Dodge which occurs on June 8 9 and 10 In accordance with their custom the Epworth league of the Methodist church will give their May breakfast at tha church the morning of May 1 The local committee in connection with the North Iowa fair were considerably elated over the arrival of additional premiums which has swelled the total pre mium budget of the buttermakers department to POEMS THAT LIVE SONG Flame at the core of the world And flame in the red rosetree The one Is the fire of ancient spheres The other Is Junes to be And oh theres a flame that Is both their flames Here at the heart of me As strong as the fires of stars As the prophet rosetree true The fire of my life ts tender and wild Its beauty Is old and new For out of the Infinite post it came With the love in the eyea of yonl engine A year earlier another Ger man Gottlieb Daimler had put a similar engine on a bicycle It was not until nearly a decade after Benzs historic buggy ride that the first American motor car put in an appearance Prior to the time of Benz and Daimler a few steam cars had beent manufactured some as early as the latter part of the eigh teenth century But no one had suc ceeded in harnessing the power of internal combustion thru the use of gasoline Benz died last week at the age of Si He received during his lifetime many honors and university degrees because of his pioneering the motor Industry He saw the industry that he started develop into one of the worlds largest Thru mechanical evolution his little lcylinder model has hccome 4 6 and 8cyIinder ma chines with a few such behemoths as Captain Segraves car that made the Daytona course in 231 miles an hour The United States now has the dominant place In the manufacture of motor cars But we must concede to Germany the priority and to Benz our homage to the man who founded an institution done at the respective office You will note that our Big Sister Austin to our east is away down the line Albert Lea ranks seventh in the state in postal receipts Bere is the way they run Minne apolis first then follows St Paul Duluth Winona Rochester Jlan comes Albert Lea A LAKE OF GASOLINE Burlington Gazette During 1928 the citizens of the United States burned upwards of 14000000000 gallons of gasoline A speaker at a recent meeting of the Society of Automotive Engineers in New York pointed out that this would make a lake five miles in diameter and nearly four feet deep Putting it In terms like that helps one to realize the tremendous im portance that oil has In modern American society It also em A SANE BANKING BILL Boone News Republican Iowa has a brand new banking law It has no eature of bank guarantee at all jut it is designed to make banks safer for the public There wil be more bank examiners closer scrut ny of state banks and trust com panies and a closer watch on the learance of one bank with another The new law is not radical in any sense There is one feature which is not entirely desirable and that is that it is no longer criminal to re ceive deposits in a bank which IB insolvent unless fraudulent Intent can be proved It la probably true that some bankers have been con victed under the old law for receiv ing deposits into a bank without knowing whether it was solvent or not However we think the old law was a good one as It made bankers more careful and it is hardly pos sible that a bank should become in solvent without the officers of the institution knowing it In the new law the rate of inter est paid under the BrookhartLov ien law Is reduced from to 2 eginning in 1930 This we presume vlll please Scott county to the amount of V but we may expect o still hear groans from the sol ent counties which have to pay for allures in other parts of the state It is expected that one of the finest exhibits seen in I phasizes the difficulties that would this part of the state will be at the fair in the nature of dairy products Harry Keerl and Chester Stevens are near Des Moines where they are looking after a ditching enter prise To pay the salaries of the county sheriff auditor clerk treasurer recorder and supervisors of Cerro Gordo county and besides the expenses of their sev eral offices cost the people the sum of 1299597 In 1908 This does not include the expenses of the office of the superintendent of schools The summary only takes the salaries of the officers and their deputies and other expenses such as postage etc The sheriffs office requires the largest budget a total of while the auditor comes next with a total of The recorders office costs the least The county treas urer used the most postage and the supervisors the least The auditor the recorder and the treasurer each were given extra help the auditors office requiring 300 to meet the expense A big shepherd dog last evening made things lively on Main street by settling the pugilistic Instinct found in the canines owned by J E BIythe and C H Mc Nlder taking one at a time So savage was the on slaught of the shepherd that the police and bystanders lie in the way of adopting gasoline substitutes Benzol for instance can be made from coal yet If all the soft coal mined in the country last year were made Into benzol It would only make a tenth as big as this one Wo have a gasoline civilization obviously and one of our greatest problems is to insure a steady cheap supply of the allimportant fluid POSTOFFICE STATISTICS Albert Lea Tribune We are quite interested in the following dispatch which came to the Tribune today Albert Lea 53700 Austin Bemidi Brainerd Crookston 53200 Ellsworth Fairmont 53200 Fartbault S3400 Fergus Falls Hib bing Mankato Moorhead New Ulm Northfield Red Whiff had to use force to loosen the grip of the shepherd dog 53400 Rochester S3SOO St Cloud which seemed determined to make real sausage meat South St Paul Still of his opponents After disposing of the McNlder ca water S3300 Virginia nine he ran across the BIythe dog and the tactics of and Winnna the police had to be repeatei1 i Tha nbove are the salaries paii NOT COMPULSORY AT ALL Red Oak Express There is a dis Inction between state schools and denominational colleges Tuition I cut to a minimum at state institu Ions and it is charged at other col egcs The student who takes advan ege of an education at state ex ense is Indebted to the state and in return for this opportunity he is re quired to take military drill Is there anything unreasonable In this de mand The student is his own judge of the school he attends and If his conscience is so effeminate that a few commands and orders are dis tasteful to him he Is privileged to go elsewhere for his education Mili tary training is not compulsory af ter all ONEMINUTE PULPIT But ask now the beasts and they shall teach thee and the fowls of the air and they shall teach thee Or speak to the earth and It shall teach thee and the fishes of the sea shall declare unto Job xii 7 8   

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