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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 1, 1929 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 1, 1929, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas DAILY PAPER Edited for the Home FIVE CENTS PER COPT ANDMASON CITY ASSOCIATED PIUSSS WIRE MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY APRIL 1 1929 FINAL EDITION UNITED PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS SUPPLE MENTAL SERVICES NO 149 COMMITTEES MORE CLEAR penate House Proposal to Center on Federal Board ITASHINGTON April 1 With the farm relief hearings ist completed senate and house iTriculture committee leaders are ginning to see clearly the outjJeps the legislation they will prtjpose en congress meets April 115 to rry out one of the major pledges Hoover campaign The bills are expected to be idea of FEDERALS KILLED IN BATTLE OM W i V V I MMB Liquor rrom Aurora Woman Ambassador HerricK Is Dead in Paris Frlnch Acclaim U S Statesman Hto Diplomat DIPLOMAT DEAD Comes Following i Atta if t Heart Ik federal farm scope of its powers has been definitely defined but the lers Bftt with present but councils on the eds crops The calls for provision re fund of 5300000000 1 moieto finance efforts to pro mt violent depressions In the lev Si of afericultural prices thru sta corporations which would csfebllshea whenever the com found the accu pf Mftpluscs great enough afjBst yis Domestic market questianf including in the means ol ijmting j crop remifinsHp be jftfoer Softie think ratio lent Hoover has ad policy so isentation of a de is concerned both re still hopeful that to get a more In e o ge a moren into the administra sf ons vlaqpjoint from Secretary 5r yde accepted invitations appearTSefore tham this week To Resume Ferry Service DAVENPORT April 1 1 HI avenportRock Island ferry and e steamer W J Quinlan will re me operations Tuesday or Wednes following the winter suspen j The wars that found America dl Hed into hostile camps were the svil war the Revolution the War i 1812 and the i iliune i lOWAjFORECAST i Partly clondy Monday night ind Tncsdiy unsettled In northeast fortlon freezing temperature j Monday night ilightly warnier Tuesday LOCAL STATISTICS weather figures for hour period ending at 8 oclock m Monday j i Highest Sunday 81 Degreei Lowest In Nljht 22 Degrees j At 8 A M Monday 31 Degrees Snowfall 4 Inclles Precipitation 45 of an Inch For like period ending at 8 oclock a m Sunday Highest Saturday 36 Decrees Lowest in Night 28 Degrees Snowfall 5 Inches Precipitation 33 oE an Inch If its the last impressions that inger March will go down in his lory as a horrible month While the iperiod as a whole was predom inantly clear and balmy the latter almost clear of snow on the jext to the last day the snow began tiling and when April arrived on lie scene no less than 9 inches of now was on the ground This pre pitated 98 of an inch of water Tonday morning the wind contin nd out of the northwest but a sun was in competition with and the snow level was bein ewhnt reduced Ambassador Myron T Hcr rlek one of the most widely khojvn of the American MOOTING April sported here S Gibson r to Belgium I Ambassador BDLL1 VVASHJNGTO It was reliably today that Hugl present ambassadi would succeed Herrick to PARIS April 1 today mourned the death of another of the men who helped it thru the dark rocky days th war United States Ambassador My ron T Herrick was another na tions loss almost Death came to Ambassador Her rick yesterday at p m after a sudden swift heart attack that left him within an hour lifeless but with a smile on his lips on his bed at the embassy old Sleet Stops Wire Service STATES HARD HIT BY STORM POLES BROKEN Several Cities Cut Off From Telegraphic Communication CHICAGO April 1 man son but this country felt the weather left the middle west moat as tho he were her own contemplating the seriousness of He was 75 years GIVES SELF UP Chicago Legislator Finally Shows Up at Mar shals Office pHICAGO April 1 man M A Mlchaelson of Chi cago indicted at Jacksonville Fla on charges of violating the national prohibition law surrendered here today to Henry C W Laubenheim er United States marshal Congressman Michaels ons ap pearance was surrounded wittt secrecy and he was ushered immedi ately into the office of Edwin 1C Walker United States commission er to make bonds Dry Solon Is NEW YORK April 1 Charges of customs officials that Representative William M Morgan republican brot four bottles of li quor ashore from the steamer Chrls abel engaged the attention of United States Attorney TutUe to day HB said it sufficient evidence was obtained the case would be pre sented to the federal grand Jury Tha customs inspectors said they ound four bottles labelled whisky n Mr Morgans baggage Monday and that he admitted it was whisky Mr Morgan who has dented the charges has been elected to con rress five times on a dry platform le voted for the Jones act under which he would be prosecuted if in dicted Contracted While Caring for Relative NASHUA Aprrl Jer gens 35 Stanley who came here to assist in caring for his fatherin law Elmer Potter who died one week ago Thursday contracted pneumonia while caring for Mr Potter and died Saturday Mr Jergens was born in Tripoli Nov 13 1893 Later he moved to Fairbanks and from there to Water loo where he was married seven yenra ago to Mrs Gertrude Bray who survives him with two daugh ters Alice 6 and Grace 4 He Is also survived by two brothers John pf Fresno and Lloyd of Far inks Arrangements for the funeral ive not been completed but the birial will be in Nashua Shortly afterward Premier Ray mond Poincare told Col T Bentley Mott assistant military attache at the embassy that the French government cA w shall be done Ambassadbr Hel Bks family may ask anything tease and it shah be done Acclaimed in French newspapers day eamffassadbrs fleath expression of condolence oi behalf of the nation to j Admiral1 Vedel General Lasson and Jules Michel head of his civil cabinet who called at the embassy to driver Jt Frenchmen rcmeiQberad more than anything else Ambassador Herricks remainingin Paris in 1914 and how he offered M Poincare then president to fly the United States flag overj Louvere and buildings containing1 Frances art treasures to shield pos sible destruction should the Ger mans take the city part the French nation would play in them were held in abeyance pend ing conferences with officials in Washington and with Mr Herricks son Parmely Herrick who was in Cleveland when his father died Wanted No Floral Display The body today rested on a bed In the room in which he died It waa planned to have it remain there un til Wednesday when itwill be taken to the American cathedral and placed in special chapel There were no flowers Like Marshal Foch the ambassador prior to his death asked there be no floral display at his funeral Thruout the past winter recurrent fits of illness weakened Ambassador Herrick but It was believed he was well on the road to recovery Marched in Foch Cortege Last Tuesday ha marched for three hours in the cortege of Mar TtJBN TO PAGE 2 COLUMN 3 some of his April fool pranks today Chief among thosa who felt the wrath of this ironic jokester were the telegraph telephone and power companies whose wires wero water bound with rain ice snow aud sleet in many sections Telegraph wires thruout Wiscon son Upper Michigan Minnesota and parts of Illinois Iowa and Neb raska were at least partly para lyzed wreaking havoc with com mercial business and pdss associa tion news services Sine points wera cut off entirely fil m telegra phic comnmnicatiog vile other partial March Goesj Out in Easter Snowstorm Communication Paralyzed Highways Drifted in North Iowa MARCH went out in a roaring snowstorm that proved the old sayingabout the lion and lamb is more than poetry and giving the weather man an opportunity to play an April 1 prank on the thousands I who had put away their snow shov els for the season The average snow fall was about 9 inches and the pre cipitation an inch The storm which started falling Saturday evening and blustered DENIES RUM CHARGE Will Rogers NEW YORK March weeks Nobel prize goes to Bank er Charley Mitchell for digging up that 525 000000 when the boys was just going over the falls He helped out the small investor for 525000000 would bo no good to a big1 one Congress wants every body to go broko just to prove they are WILL ROGERS right See where the British embassy landed 10 000 cases at Baltimore Thats just enough to tide em over for the weekend tin a shipment worth while shows up Slam embassy got in two truck loads the other day thats a lot of nourishment for a couple of twins I would rather own an embassy than to own a country Yours WILL Copyright 1929 serve as an outlet for electric cur rent which seeps out and is grounded weakening wheut current is not lost by broken wires The heavy rains which in some sections turned to snow and sleet as the temperature fell also transportation in several ariAs Telephone service was inteA ited between Freeport III and Iowa More than 100 poles were re ported down between the two points with more than an inch of sleet on the wires Pearl GHy III were reported without lights as the result of broken power lines Many highways from Freeport north were temporarily blocked by fallen trees Passengers Storm Bound CEDAR RAPIDS April hundred and seventyfive passen gers who shivered in storm bound interurbaa cars between here and Waterloo yesterday were started on their way again today This city was cut off by wire communication from all towns in the middle west this morning Sleet laden wires cracked during the BIRDS NEED FEED Foed the birds This was the suggestion of Frank C Goodman head of the local Izaak Walton league based on the problem growing out of Sundays heavy snow The birds are entirely cut off from their food supply said Mr Goodman Different from the birds which winter here the ones here now are not accus tomed to coping with winter tradition Same about at his feet without slightest show of fear hf thruout Sunday piling the drifts as high as the snow fences tempor arily stopped motor traffic and en tirely paralyzed wire communica tion thruout North Iowa 150 Poles Down While no serious damage to the telephone service occurred locally the Western Electric Telephone TURN TO PAGE 2 COLUMN 1 Bus Company Fights Suit for Ella B Wood Asks Damages of Waverly Court for Accident Injury WAVERLY April trial of the case of Ella B Wood vs G B night and this morning the city was Luck and Red Ball Transportation depending for its news of the world company incorporated a damage largely on the radio broadcasts suit for a total of 531000 has been Congressman William Morgan of Ohio sin irreconcil ablo opponent of the liquor traffic has Issued emphatic denial of reports that liquor wus found in his baggage on ar York from Pan fMprpap an en on I hut lie had never taken a drink in liis life Rum Bought by Agent at Gas Station Prosecutor Wants Attorney General to Take Charge of Case AURORA 111 April 1 man who made the buy in the Deking liquor raid case has been found He is Philip Johnson and he has told attorneys that he did not purchase liquor from Mrs Lillian Deking at all The shooting to death of Mrs De king a week ago by a deputy sheriff took place at the Deking home dur ing a raid made under a search war warrant in turn was on a buy of liquor rant The predicated vhioh Eugene Boyd Fairchild act ing as a county investigator de clared he had made from a woman at the Deking home Fairchild told authorities that the complaint on which the warrant was obtained was inaccurate in declar ing he personally had made the pur chase He said Johnson son of a gas station owner at Batavia III had been the actual buyer of tho liquor using money which Fairchild fur nished Volunteered His Story Johnson who volunteered his story to attorneys representing Joseph Deking said he did not buy the liquor at the Deking home or from a woman as the Fairchild complaint declared The buy was made Johnson said from a man in front of Staffords filling station REBELS CLAIM VICTORY AFTER 10HOUR FIGHT Gen Escobar Says 1500 Prisoners Planes Aid Attack JUAREZ Chihuahua Mexico April J1 by 15 airplanes Mex ican rebels actively led by thoir commander Gen Jose Gonzalo Es cobar today claimed to have won an initial victory in a 10hour bat tle neav Escalon Sunday in which 400 federals were reported killed and 1500 taken prisoner The rebels moved into the terri tory around Escalon Saturday night it was reported at rebel head quarters here and engaged the fed eral command about noon Sunday fighting1 until nightfall Today a rebel detachment was reported to be pursuing fleeing federal troops to ward Torreon General Escobar indicated Ic Tils report that he would remain in Es calon today but would start south tomorrow on the heels of what ha characterized as demoralizing gw ernment troops Among the federal officers ported killed in the encounter des cribed as the initial battle of tho campaign wag Gen Eulogio Ortiz Was Surprise Attack General Escobar related participated in the engage erating a machine gun clashes In the first ha gun from the top and in the second by federal he A S V Bricks from Des Moines Davenport and other cities Hail In South ST LOUIS April wind and rain storm of cyclonic proportions swept over southern Missouri yes terday spreading damage and Injur ies to several communities and many persons So far as could ta learned no one was killed The wind was accompanied by a terrific hail storm the hail stones covering the ground soxith of hero for a depth of an inch The storm leveled many farm buildings up rooted trees and did similar damage in the section GALLOGLY AND HARSH GET LIFE Former Students Permitted to Plead Guilty to Take Sentence ATLANTA Ga April 1 George R Harsh of Milwaukee and Richard G Gallogly wealthy for merOglethorpe university students today pleaded guilty to murder and were sentenced to life imprison ment On agreement of Solicitor Gen eral John A Boykin the action was taken immediately after Harsh has been granted a new trial following his conviction and sentence to death for the murder of Willard Smith a drug clerk during a holdup At his previous trial he had entered a plea of not Ruilty by reason of mental responsibility institutions act for this week before Judge M H Kepler in district court here It will follow the trial of Victor Johnson on a charge of receiving stolen property In the case Miss Wood is suing for 56000 specific and gen eral damtges claimed to have been incurred Dec 6 1926 in an automo bile accident at a culvert a mile and a half north of Plainfield Caused by Kunway The accident the plaintlff3 peti tion says was caused by a danger ous runway which defendants con structed or causedto be constructed around the culvert This work waa done at the time paving was bcinjr dom on No 238 and a detour was still being used The plaintiff was thrown against the top of the car in which she was riding and was permanently in jured HO badly that she is totally unable to do any work She statea she was able to make 565 a week as B hairdresser Astoi Slin asks 51000 for medical care 55000 specific damages and loss of services and general dam ages She is represented by Daniel J Hollihim and Sagcr Sweet while Mr Luck the bus driver is repre sented by Arben L Young and the bus company by J E Williams nipany bj National City Bank orvNew York in Merger NSFV YORK April 1 Mer ger National City bank and the Formers Loan Trust com pany wns announced today by Charles E Mitchell president of the Civibb wld his dray personal nronertv S National City subject to the npirnO Mrs Crrhb imasn Windows Across Street DRISTOW April Circ which caused damage estimated at from to S20000 destroyed a two story brick hnilding and three adjoining frame buildings here this morning The volunteer department fought the fire with buckets of water car ried from puddles of melted suow in the streets The blaze which was of unknown origin was discovered in tie two story brick building occupied by the John Sinke department store and the Bristow Hardware company at 6 oclock this morning The build ing tho upstairs of which contains the Masonic and Eastern Star lodge rooms was filled with smoke and entrance was Impossible No Water Available No water was available to fight the fire as the electricity which is used to pump the water into an elevated tank night because Clarksville fire department was called but arrived too late to be of any use in stopping the conflagra tion A frame house east of the brick building owned by Mrs James Wal shand two frame store buildings on the south sirle owned by Mrs Maude Arnold caught firo and were burner to the prround The heat in the burninjr Sinke store was so in tense that the bricks tumbled from the walls Windows Aro Broken AH the nlate glass windows In a store building across the street west from the fire were smashed by the falling bricks and windows were broken In the postoffice ncross the street to the north Even n window in the bank buildine rliajjr across the corner was broken As no one could enter brick building where the blazn started nothincr wns removed and the con tents of Ixfh stores ami tho loflpe rooms on the second floor were a total loss was shut off last of the storm The Shortly after Johnsons account was made known last night States Attorney George D Carbary of Kane county under whose cleanup campaign the raid was made in dicated an irention to turn the in vestigation over to the attorney general of Illinois Such an action would be an unusual legal pro cedure inasmuch as Illinois law pro vides that the attorney general act only when a county prosecutor has been found to be prejudiced The understanding today was that Carbary planned to go before a circuit judge and submit a petition asking the court to direct the at torney general of Illinois to take charge of the case Desires Investigation In so doing Carbary said I do not necessarily admit that I nm prejudiced in the usual sense of the ivord for I um not I desire nothing than a complete investigation and punishment oC anyone found guilty violating the law Robert A Milroy attorney rep resenting Deking announced receipt an offer of 55000 from a Snlt Lake City man for prosecution oE officials responsible for the shoot ing The telegram signed Orman W Ewing said the sender and his were willing to raise the noney to help defray expenses of aringing slayers Mrs Deking to justice ADMITS SLAYING MAN IN HOLDUP Minnesotan Confesses Shoot ing During Snelling Gambling Game tracka facing the cei the ap MINNEAPOLIS April 3 arl Laying 32 who killed a former comrade while holding up a card game at Fort Snelling was in cus tody today aa preparations were made to present his case to the Hennepin county grand jury which meets tomorrow In a written statement to Deputy Sheriff John McGuire he is said to have admitted the holdup was his first crime and that he had planned to get money for his wife and eight months old baby The shooting fcnok place early yesterday at the army post when the victim Corp Samuel Boztk 30 member of Company C third in fantry flung himielf upon Laying who had appeared armed with a uved off shotgun and masked withj i handkerchief In the struggle Bozik received a buckshot charge in the side dying shortly afterward proaching federal lines he said Two surprises were accredited by the rebel commander with brot his troops victory The rebel136 general said that his march toward Escalon had not been expected and subsequently tho government troops were not prepared for it The sec ond surprise came from the air he reported when 15 robe planes ap peared over the battlefield in the midst of the fighting Expect Another Attack NACO Sonora Mexico April 1 watchful after experi encing two Easter day aerial at tacks federal soldiers entrenched at the Waco garrison stood by their guns this morning with their eyes on a semicircle of rebel camp fires to the east south and west Another attack more vicious than the aerial raid was expected from the insur rectors A lona rebel plane from Topetes camp made yesterdays raids The first was in the morning arousing the sleepy village to a high pitch of excitement Four bombs wero dropped but only two exploded There were reports of casualties af ter the first raid but they could not be verified The plane flew low and the fed erals sent up a barrage of rifle and machine gun bullets in answer Second Causes Stampede On his afternoon visit the rebel bomber flew 4000 feet above tho city and dropped three bombs Tho first explosion caused a stampede of American sightseers thru the In ternational gate Another missed al most a direct hit in the trenches The third bomb plunged thru tin roof of an empty building near the Mexican customs house Tha en plosion shook plaster from ceilings of the nearby cafes and rattled win dows on the American side Scores of Americana perched on railway boxcars on the American side of the border witnessed the second air raid Tlrny Arril tInrry proval of the stockholders of both Cit 1 chased the dray business ine nnri tiirrliv JTI move to Trurraham pur All Over But LEAVKNWORTH Krns April 1 f Clrrk Warder Rl Dodge City married Mary Ungnrd I Ofi also of Podpe City Misu Alice Brind deputy performed the probnte ceremony whv had to ihout at the top of her lungs in or Jder for the elderly couple to hear AUNT HET Robert Quillan My boy John didnt make no money pniclicm medi cine but hns done right well since he fjot a while coat an set tip as it specialist V   

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