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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 6, 1927 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 6, 1927, Mason City, Iowa                                MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THURSDAY OCT 6 1927 THREE fflttg ilo Office 121123 East A Lee Syndicate Newspaper State Street 27 23 and 29 Telephone Numbers WILL F MUSE W EARL Editor LT3B P LOOMIS Business Manager CERKO GOKDO CO ftEPUBtlCAN Established 18G1 Weekly Globe Established May 1882 Dally Globe Establishes OctQber 1890 The Mason City Times Founded In 1870 Issued Every Week Day Afternoon by MASON CVCY GLOBEGAZETTE COMPANY MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Associated Press exclusively entitled to the use for publication ot oil news dispatches credited to it or Jiot otherwise credited In this paper and also all local published hereto Official Paper in the City and County SUBSCRIPTION RATES In Mason City and Clear inks Dally per year Dally per week Oatalde of Mason City antf Clear Lalio Daily per jrear by carrier Daily per Veek by carrier f lally jer year by mail S months 3montna 1 1 Outside 100 mile zone dally per year f months 3 months Advertising Rates Furnished on Application Entered at the Postofflco at Mason City Iowa as SecondClass Matter THE RACE CONFLICT Presence of negroes in high school classes caused a student strike at Gary in which students were virtually victorious The ichool board promised to erect a segregrated high school for negroes rustiing a temporary structure immediately to completion and the agreed to accept negro companions at classes until the building is opened This is not an unfamiliar symptom of American social stress it has happened fre quently befoiji The noteworthy element in the story is the fact that it happened so far on the shores of Lake Michigan Tlie race problem once an issue on which the north superiorly advised the south from the heights of ignorance has crossed tire Mason Dixon line Within the last ten years it has become a national instead of a sectional problem Not solong since there was serious race rioting Tn Chicago It is an urgent prob lem in New York city The country has no solution in sight ex cept to keep the races apart It works after a fashion but it is not a permanent answer to the insistent demands of the situation created by the growing selfassertion and con fidence of the negro and the growing hostility the whites whose economic status is chal by the colored worker It is satisfactory solution because it is always on relegation of the colored people to sosition of inferiority Perhaps it woulc iivOTkif i 1 em en dolil or selfrespecting negroes have no more desire to mingle with the whites than is manifestec from the other side of the equation A longtime settlement of the conflict be tween the we must have a long time settlement for it is a permanent prob I lem that tends to grow rather than diminish in be designed to effect a modus vivendi in which neither race will be irritated and angered by social assumptions I which do not square with economic and lega facts The black man is a citizen and in creasingly also a producer and contributor to the general welfare Given equal opportunity there is probably no vast difference between his capacity and that of his white neighbor He is entitled to have these qualities recog nized in his relationships with the state and F with society STEPS ONWARD Easy travel easy communication and change are the first fruits of civilization Prehistoric wilder than modern man and had no family cares or home or ausiness to attach him to one locality yet he was less free to travel than modern man Air planes railroads automobiles and steamships give to everyone the freedom of the world Before science gave to man the telephone telegraph wireless and radio and swift means of transportation those afar had little hope of again seeing or being seen by those left behind Today one can talk around the world and circumnavigate the globe in a few days by air and in a few weeks by land and sea Once man was provincial perforce now by choice The arts of printing and reading widen still further tho horizW of mans acquaintance Books and periodicals mirror for him the most distant lands t nd the dim past They concen rate in ones own library the accumulated tnowledge and experience of Thus here is possible a fellowship unhindered by ime and space and a communion of kindred pirits in a language that is universal Than these nature has bestowed no great r gifts upon humanity Without them man ould not have climbed to his present state of Civilization and deprived of them he would re rert to a lower state They are his indispens able aides in his wars against fanzine pestil nce ignorance intolerance and war THE OLD HOME TOWN The only fellow who can beat the stock alesman at handing out golden promises for he future is the candidate in the midst of a red hot primary battle Winder if Brother Lund did not have a chill when he read that Big Bill Thompson would run in tho primaries of Illinois against jowden Answers to Questions Any reader can get the answer to any question by writing the GlobeGazette Information Bureau Fred eric J Haskin Director Washington D C This offer applies strictly to Information The bureau does not give advice on medical and financial matters nor does It attempt to settle domestic troubles nor to undertake exhaustive research on any subject Write your question plainly and briefly Give Cull name and address and enclose two cents In stamps for return postage All replies are sent direct to the inquirer OTHER EDITORS And in the End Educative Marshnlltown Times Hepubllcan Is there i hospital In clsewliere has not today as onoot Its occupants a person who has been In jured In an automobile s there a cemetery In any town In the United States that has not as an occupant of one Its graves one who I DARBX CLERK AT THE BOSTON HAD A SERIOVJS BREAK WITH THE THE TO DAT Way of the World By GKOVB PATTERSON STROLLING A LOST ART A well known magazine writer complains that whenever he starts to take a walk he has so many invitations from motorists to jump that he seldom succeeds in getting the exercise and relaxation he had anticipated irom his stroll On a country road I cant go but a few rods before a well meaning motorist offers to give me a lift and I havent the heart to tell i him tHat Im he laments The automobile has reduced strollers to the point that for one to set out on a Sunday afernoon for an aimless jaunt about town or sountry is to invite a degree of attention that the motorist suffered when auomobiles tvere as unusual a sight as a horse and buggy today The business man hitting it off to work in the morning is familiar to most of us But f many of them are doing it under the com fevpulsion of advice from some examining phy sician The prevalence of motor vehicles has in creased these ills arising from sedentary habits Walking is a form of self discipline i when the car is at hand That it pays is indi j cated by the vigor of those business executives I who engage in it regularly Aimless strolling is not only a salutary but improves our powers of obser Svation since it opens up new fields new A sights and fosters new ideas Q Are people still Injured In Fourth of July cele brations A S M A There were 195 deaths and injuries reported as a result of Independence Day celebrations this sum mer More than 150 of the deaths were of youns folks under 20 Q What part of the weight of a live lobster IB PdJblef B E T A Four pounds of live lobster will give one pound of meat Q Pleaso dellne radio J A D A Tho Loomls Hadlo college says that radio In the generally Jatheart of carrying on means of electric waves which arc radiated from transmitting stations and picked up by r celvlng stations Q Does the wind against a train nffect the distri bution of its weight upon tlio two rails H E J A If the wind Is directly against the across the rail on the one side next to the wind will have less load The difference Increases with the strength of the wind or push of the wind aganst tho cars Q How many words Hhould be acquired In a scholastic year of studjot a foreign language K Jf J A One college informs us that it considers one thou sand words a fair vocabulary for each year of tho foreign language instruction Most of tho first year school books contain a vocabulary of about one thousand to twelve hundred words 0 How can rusted ateel buckles be cleaned Iff J A Soak the buckles in kerosene for one hour Then irusli them well Q When was coast to coast telephone In augurated B E S A The first coast to coast telephone service was started from New York to San Francisco on Jan 26 1315 the same day such a service was established from Bos ion to San Francisco 0 I finil tho word throughly used several times In the Bible Is this an accepted form of thorough P F H A It is obsolete or archaic Some modern versions of the Bible use the form Q How many ministers of the Christian faith are there in the United States How many of them are Roman Catholics S S A According to the Federal Council of Churches Year book there are ot all denominations ministers Of this number aro Roman Catholic priests J How much radium is there C E T A The Bureau of Standards says that there may be eight to ten ounces of radium in the world today but it has no definite figures Q What city has the finest opera house in the United States W L D A Probably the Auditorium theater Chicago is thn finest It was built In 1890 at a cost of about Q What does tho Hawaiian word Knllna mean A G M A It is a word which means any old withered vine It 13 also applied to an old potato vine that has finished hearing How dfd number of slaves compare with the number of free negroes at the time of the Civil war J I A In 1860 there were slaves and free negroes in the United Statea NATURE NEVER TIRESOME Nature never irrpws stale She never falls to interest Is full of tricks If you know how to lcev her perform Over in Glen Cove N there Is an apple tree that bears 35 varieties oC apples Grafting operations per ahlps in etffht Young people should Ijo tercsted in this expression of Judge Gary Its the men who have been thru the mill ot life who believe most 1n education Think that over when you are trying to decide whether you are going this fall to college form wonders Burbonk knew the tricks Others JKAZES aro learning We shall have to learn a lot of no need to worry oyer things In the next hundred much about momentary years if the werld Isnt gocrazes may Inst for ing to be hungry Just now pnpulatlou Is growing Woo fast1 for the food supply GAKY KNEW Speaking of jazz theres crazes j may Inst fo years bp real vav And years nre tho long run only moments In the Mlddlo Ages Kurope Bibert H Gary late head went thru an astonishing ot tho U S Steel corpor ation was not so wrapped up In tho processes making money tbat ho didnt keep In mind tha education In his will ho set up eight trust funds to provide scholar crazo for dancing sands danccil in streets Madness T Thou tht in tha air It the main idea of the period But the danco fad o the Middle Ages has rmen forgotten Jazz win bo furgoUen these internationalists and pacifists disarmament for the United Stales why dontthey carry around a China with s a benevolent example of disarma trVimncd Witti tiny Any reader can get the answer to any ouestlon hy writing the GlobeGazette Information Bureau Frederic J Haskin Director Washington D C This offer np plies strictly to information The Bureau can not give advlco on legal medical and financial matters It loos not attempt to settle domestic troubles nor undertake ex haustive research on nny subject Write your question plainly and briefly Give full name and address and en close two cents in stamps for return postage Tho reply is sent direct to the Inquirer Address the Mason City GlobeGazctto Ipformatlon Bureau Frederic J Haskin Director Washington B C One Minute Pulpit For if ye love them which love you what thank have ye for sinners also love those that Jove them And If ye do good to them which do good to you what thank have ye for sinners also do even the same But love ye your enemies do good and lend hoping for nothing again and your shall he great and yc shall ho the children of the Highest forhe In kind unto the unthankful and to tho vi 3235 EARLIER DAYS was killed in fin automobile acci If so where is It The fatal accident which cost two lives Is attributed to glaring Mr Soamlso states that hla brakes tailed to The passing car was running at high speed and In avoid ing the ditch on tho left It sldewlped lha Jones car Hath cars turned over fatally injuring Or sueclatora at tho accident state that the Smith car was running flCty miles an hour at the blind in lor sect I on ot tho Jef ferson with the sldo road Funeral Etc Etc Su on Soforth Had brakes bad lights recklesaness poor vision and defianco or ncglecl to observe the traffic laws and aws of common highway decency are for most of the wrecks on he road In the hospitals and those In the cemeteries filled by ac Neglect of the cars them selves slackness and Incompetence of alleged mechanics all have their part in tho list of casualties which since tho war has aken toll of more lives than America gave to war Which calls Attention io Massa chusetts where at present a state wide Inspection ot automobiles Is un der way for two weeks Tho cars must ho Inspected They are marked safe or Headlights brakes and other parts are Inspected Un safe tars have their licenses held up until pronounced safe Falling to make safe loses the license livery driver In Massachusetts must have a driverslicense Every car must car ry liability Insurance Moreover Governor Fuller calling attention to tha number ot auto ac cidents In tho atate promises If the present legal restrictions do not cor rcct considerably tho Hat of acci dents that more drastic legislation will follow Of course no amount ot legislation can make a safe driver out of a reek ess fool J3ut It does appear thnt Mas sachusetts may him from he lint ot road dangers by revocation of his Heense that compulsory Inspec tion of cars brakes make for much greater Kafety Moreover the certainty that without nowledgo and conformity to the laws the license goes glimmerInk is thor y miMsure No Incite ment to education beats of get ting educated or going afoot Diet and Health By Lulu Hunt Peters M D Author of IHet and Health und Diet for Children Hy Democrat One ot Democrat anrt Iraicrs special ington correspondents pave promi nence in n recent ttispntch to a tersa utterance thnt JVesltieiU Coollclse had made on tho wuhject ot labor and wapros Ho was receivinga delegation of KngJIsh traveler n who exprcased their amazement lit the waffe level bt thin country and naked him IioV American worMnsmcn could earn much By tha resident The American tra velar In finds the state of tho Jlrlttili working man much below that of the Amerl Tho principal reason la not merely one of and home conill ilons Britain Is a country of claaaea The thing 4hat rnakivq tho American worker what heJs will ha found In i3 determination to better himself to Iso from the place in which ho Is to a Iietter place Ho knows that no social barrier stands In his way He will be accepted for what ho Is worth No body cares who grandfather wan The deference between a going man anil one who Is not liefi In slnplo word ambition ambition In tho slnKl tapfi of the America rank ant Tho right to greatest herl fllo of us in jV Pertinent Question Journal is It if Governor Smith Is nucn a strict advo cate of law enforcement that every actual and woultlbo violator of the prohibition laws Is backing him to the limit Aro they for htm becaunn they think hes going1 to cnforco the Volstead act so nCElclontly Ground was broken Thursday on tho new post office site on Michigan street Temporary buildings are In the course of erection to houfie the tootg andother belongings of tho workmen Mrs and her mother left this morning for Hud el where they will visit over Sunday among relatives Dr W W Carlton leaves Tuesday for Cedar Falls where ho will attend the district conference ot the Methodist church L T Hawkins and family leave today for a three days visit with relatives at Sprlns Valley Dr Marston was In Hanlontown this mornlnu A lj Rule la homo from n business trip to Omaha Mrs Walter Emerson of New Hampton who has been here visiting with Mr and Mra Carl Seeley returned to her home yesterday Mrs S A Koch went to Charles City today for n short visit with her sister Mrs Maxflctd who lately moved there wltfy her husband who is managing a hotel there Mrs Henry Stearns lett this morning for McGregor where she will visit for several days among there and In neighboring places She was accompanied by Miss Vina Shilling a cousin of Sam Shilling who after a several days visit here Is on her way home to Mercer Pa Ticket Clerk Arthur Thorne at the Northwestern hna resigned to accept the position of freight billing clerk at tho freight house for the same company suc ceeding N H Newell Who went with the American Brick and Tile company Mr Thorne la one of the bpst posted ticket clerks In the city and Is a valuable man in the position and will prove equally able In his new position He Is succeeded by Mr Markey who formerly hnn lcen operating one of the towers for the Northwestern com pany Tho Milwaukee was taxed to Its utmost yesterday Between of 7 a m and 3 p m 23 trains arrived and departedfrom the local yards Consideringthe short ness of power which the company has been doing busi ness with lately this was considered phenomena Mrs Phclps of New Hampton who has been the guest of her sister Mrs returned home this morning Mr Mrs Richard Davcy left this morning for Milwaukee where they will visit for a week or more Miss Alma Schneider of Monona after a visit hero with relatives left for her home this evening The rnln and wind storm of Wednesday nipht did con siderable damage nt the floral hall tent to several of the exhibits on tho north anri west side of the area Perhaps the chief sufferer was G M Woodruffs shoe exhibit which was badly soiled by the rain and required furnishings and exhibits to restore the former beauty nnd attractive ness of the booth Miss Donna Belle Elder and Miss Hazel Stanbery de lighted a largo number of ladles at MarHhalltovvn Satur day afternoon at a recital given by them at tho C II E Boardman home at that place Miss Elder who has charge of the oratory department at Memorial university won much applause and approval for her artistic work Miss Stanbery was highly complimented on her piano numbers The young ladles enjoyed their visit highly and returned today Carrier McKwen has returned from a few flays vaca tion in Faycttc and Rockwell or mm trim ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS One Meal a Day How many calories in one ordinary yeast cake and what Is the effect of saccharin on system I take two grains ot It a day OC course I amJPcterslzine after a fashion but I disobey you In a great many ways for 1 take but one meal a breakfast or otlll I am losing satisfactorily First let ma say that youre disobeying me by taking one meal a day if you prefer It that way nnd fine It agrees with you B I have told you to distribute your calories tho way you like beat and if you want them a In ona meal hop to it When I was considerably younger I tried that one mealaday stunt We were living in a little country town and every ovenlns wo used to see how far we could go Toward the postofffce which was about a mile away on a Jotr trot We finally succeeded In going nil tho way I Wiis getting a Vot of physical exercise and I didnt know anything about calories then and in the one meal I atG I used to stack up aplcnty However I succeeded iJi getting rid of the accumulation I wanted to After we moved from tho country and I wasnt getting the l Jogtrot exercises I got another little attack of expansion and I again tried tho onemeal stunt entlng ns much when I was getting the exercise It didnt work this time But I dont think tho oncmcaladay plan is very good B We are advising wo much bulky food now in the vege tables and fruits and nt least two glasses oC skim mill so that the full amount needed for the day would If taken In one meal distend tho stomach A yeast cake is 20 C ordinarily half an Tens la high In vitamin B I like the yenst extracts better am they are equally high In vitamin B and mako dejlclou broths One level teaspoon of the extract will make a good broth and counts not more than G calorics Yoi could tako this broth several times a day if you fel hungry Saccharin Is allowed to diabetics by some diabetic ape ciallsts up to two or three grains n day others bellcv this amount may be harmful It Js a coal tar produd 300 to GOO times sweeter than sugar Hadnt you bettc learn to like your liquids unsweetened Those who are In need of Instructions on how to los or tsnln weight may have our pamphlet on the subject l sending a fully selfaddressed stamped envelope and 1 cents in stamps with your request Causes of Enipilve Fevcra say that the eruptive fevers such as measles chlckenpox smallpox scarlet fever are all produced h different poisons which have accumulated In the body b the wrong habits of life No not true C While we know that wrong habit of life do lower tho resistance so that if one ia exposs to eruptive fevers be may bo more susceptible th secondary cause The primary causes of these aro the particular germs which are acquired by tho pe son so exposed and if these germs happen to be vlrulen enough and in sufficient quantity even it perfectly we person the disease they engender Just as th bullet will ktll or disable a perfectly well person as quick ly na a halfdead one One attack of someof these eruptive fevers confer Immunity for life that Is one never contracts them again no matter what their mode of ilvlng Is even tho they wcr nursing one very sick with it If your theory were co rcct this Immunity would not develop J Send for our article on Chronic Joint Inflammation Enclose a fully jsclfaddressed stamped envelope with you request JVOTI THIS To receive the material ofleceii by JDr Jeters mult followed for he Reducing and GainiriR pamphlet semi 10 cents in cash or sumps anil a stamned envelope For other form letters he stamped envelope is sufficient Sign your name 39 evidence nf good for publication Wrile lesribty on one side of the paper anil give complete adiicss Do not write cily in place of he narne of your town Address Idlers lo Dr Pelerj care duneGazelle THE DRIFTER at tie works his j an lidea ot how By MAIUC BXERS I wonder how much of the practical onvenlence which we enjoy without thot in theso days lo due to the reatlvo power of laziness Tho idea camo to me other day vhen I read a dispatch relating the uccessful demonstration of n tractor ilow which once started would con Inue at the job without human guld It plowed n twentyacre Itcld xll by itself and when It got thru stopped while tho designer aat under tree and watched The dispatch said the designer had Invented it aev eral yeara ago when he got tired ol he tedium of owly t ceruly discovered thcro mieht bo a commercial field for It And eo I suppose hus every Im provement In plowa come about since he first agriculturist scratched the soil with a crooked otlck Llfo is a nuisance when It consists of doing a lard Job over and over and ths first reaction Is to find some way of doing what has to be done ns quickly and comfortably ns possible I Imagine that one could tako the history of In vention and thru its records stalk nearly every great development to tho paradox would act his fertile mental rniln of some lazy lubber who wonmachinery nt work this lino derccl how to get out of There Is n masterful in It r would write It myuclf except that I That the lazy lubber actually Invents ind puts into use the machinery him scU Is I think unusual Hes too azy tor that 1C my mental Image of him Is correct But he Is so nnxioun to ot labor that brain overtime until It might bo done pops out and the some genius who knows dn Idea when he sees one and has the energy work develops the Idea Into practice Something Hko that at amy rate I am proud of this notlrrm bccausu I have a congenial affinity for Intlhifls and would like Plaln hard one o no thnt I respectfully adml grcat a distance as I roan In apfrlt when as Is ahvajjjt hapjjnlng It flncaks up and embraces me I sup joud of ut pone I have no reason to loo pjoud of this falling and Indeed I ann nkTJut I do recognize it ns the nowrciof ncv worked mes In eral small Ideas which out Into minor laborsaving rny own line So It is not There Is a creative side It has playod Its part In t work I wish Chesterto paradox would act his fe kept on wondering until ho hud an flea nm too The Daybookof a NewYorker BV BURTON RASCOg 1rcss NEW YORK Oct and precedent are as nothing to Mrs Word Leigh an extraordinary young woman living Not only Cor purposes of a good alary but in actuality Mrs Leigh Is bcautlul nnd she has a mind of her own Some time ago she startled residents ot the small Wcstchestor town In which am lives hy fearblnj her horso Lady In made trousers In order LO protect tho animal Irom files But it la a rare horae who will submit to such an indlfinlty and Lady soon dlii away with the nnmaldenly garments At present Mrs Lelfh tliat she Is hot on the trail oC the secret of perfect To Inaugurate her system fiho proposes to live In a house which will bo nlmoat entirely made of Blnsa The house in fact la ncarlnf completion and Mrs Leigh Is to move in shortly structcd hy Tho bulldfnjj company which also DINNER STORIES UNION uvnon A wellmeaning pedestrian said to a man who employed to advertise on the street Pardon me but do know that your sandwich boarcla are turned wrong side out Sure I know won the snappy reply Yer dont suppose Im goin to work in me lunch hour do yerJ A WET DIVKtt The lecturer warmed to his task The consequences of drunkenness are terrible If I had my way I would throw every cask of beer every xttlo of wine every keg of hrandy Into the middle of the Voice from the audience Bravo bravo Li very my friend Voice from the audlcncc You are also a confirmed makes regulation greenhouses in truth the new residence will Ipol greatly like a greenhouse But in one story It Is to have three wings jut ting out to the east north and Thus will thelady bask always in sunshine which nho believes wlth many others Is an absolute ncc easily to proper health And It Is ru mored that the local police force has rtuletcfl down after Mrs Leigh de nlcrt tho humor that her glass house would not have shades There s on Broadway an elaborate motion picture dedicated to tho dead heroes of a certain branch of the army In the late war This same pic tliro was marto with the help of 1 number of enlisted men In the na lional army all of whom gave tboli services to the picture company out cost When the first showing nf tho completed film was announced i a nearby town the month nrmy men were not overjoycil when they receiver Invitations ml CIvo dolars each to tho film which they harl risked their nerks In makln neoonfly Captain Denbam a hero and ti representative ff the BristolJupiter company arrived tn Xcw York to await the landing of tho traitsAtlantic planes using motor A dlstlngrulM career as an aviator in the World war availed him nothing for he was No Im n deepsea I formcd that tickets ccuM be pur haaed at GO cents In advance of bux pffieo prices when he expressed a dn tlro to see tho picture whlrji was detl cated to men like himself At this time Park avenue in a vir ual nightman The optratiom vhlch are to do away with the pars way In the center of the nvcnue n full blast Hetwccn and Fortysixth street the street Is en tirely cut off and for two Mocks here on cither side ot tho avenuo only atcol cover tho tracks of the ground railroad In order to lit traffic thru from Fortyfifth to Fop tyslxth It haw been necessary lld a roadway directly thru o Ttew building which is under construction Cars travel northward on thia On Vanderbllt avenue parallel to synthetic highway traffic proceeds only in a southerly direction Be cause of this confusion I paid a taxt bill of 50 cents in going from Lexing ton and Fortysecond to Park and tyslxth A distance of five short blocks the Journey took me 25 min utes An orphan in current Broadway nnff is or woman who has been deserted by his or her companion al n party Phillip Payne who IVOR managing editor ot the New York Mirror ana tho passenger in the tiiinuallantic plano Old has stlrrnl tho city by his disappearance mnru titan Rny other man within thn jiast two years A day or two Ixfori Phil tooiv the air I received a letter from him congratulating meriipon is sue of a under my ediUr ship and telling me that whpn he thru with promoting Old Glorys flight he wanted to lunch with me I wrote thanking him and tolling him L hoped that he dirt not really Intend to make tho flight because I did not think New York nhould tako chnticen on losing ouch a good editor I do not know whether he ever received my loiter or not To Phil Payne must bo given tiia credit nf Inaugurating the tab loid newspaper In the United Stated and for tho tremendous success that paper became a nlmfHe kind ly and somewhatAnMve man n bril liant journalist and a of tremen dous energy   

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