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Lime Springs Sun: Thursday, November 10, 1904 - Page 1

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   Lime Springs Sun, The (Newspaper) - November 10, 1904, Lime Springs, Iowa                               HAY ISSUES CALL FOR SECOND HAGUE CONFERENCE. THE POWEIl OP VISION. Br Her. Mataan A. Semgtt, Where there la no vlslou the people xxlx., 18. There eeeuiti lo bo In the going through of a definite, fixed routine day after day and week nfter week some- thing wblch sous nud robs life ot that which. Is best and noblest In It. Cer- tainly tltosc who lend such n life have, some more, some less, their vision ob- scured and their horizon contracted. It Is duo to want of variety, perhnps to want of stimulus, AVbat- ever ths cause, the tact remains. It Is generally admitted tout one of the dangers of our ago Is that In our large uscrof machinery we ourselves arc lia- ble lo become too mnchlnollke. Imve little regard for what Is known technically as the "visionary but what we really dislike Is his impracticable, uot his visionary side. Successful men ara all more or less visionary. In fact there Is perhnps no other quality so pre-eminently essen- tial to success ns that faculty wMch enables one to look nhead to foresee and forecast Ute future. Whero there Is no vision we fall. There Is, perhaps, no belter example of Ihe power ot vision than that ot Co- luuibus. History tells ns how patient- ly nnd persistent ly be labored to se- cure assistance to follow rjp his vision and make it real to the world. He la- bored, to gain his vlalon and be labored to realise It. wonder that such n glorious vision should have rcmnlned 19 long unseen. The reason Is appar- ent The world'a brightest visions nre reserved as rewards to persistent nnd painstaking effort nnd to diligent nnd untiring research. It Is a mlsteke to tlilnk thnt nil lm Poata at Which They Bcrw-VouM Not Delay for lha War. In a circular note made public Sun- ny Secrrinry of 8Uta baa carried ut President Roosevelt's Instructions to proposing n aecoud Hague onfcrenco. The noto not only conteui- Inles Uio reassembling of Tho Hague onfercnee for the consideration of UesUous specifically mentioned by tha rlglnal conference as demanding tur- icr attention, ancb as the rights and utlee of neutrals, tbe Inviolability of rivatc property In naval warfare and lie of ports by narnl orco. but goes further by practically udorslug tie project of a general cm of arbitration treaties and tho es- tablishment ot an Internntlonal con- ress to meet periodically In tho Inter- ests of pence. Tbe Issue ot tho call vrhJlp tbe present war U la progress Is mtifled by the fact that the first conference wns called before nr treaty of peace with Spain wns concluded. _ Tho noto la addressed lo Uio Representatives of -the United tntes Accredited to tlio Governments bis ship Is one of nnd that there Is not nloitc; that great squadron, signal at the masthead of the flagxblp npon which we mnst keep our -eye fixed that all mny move together. MOTIVES lUSMQtON. Or Her. ft. A. White ItellRlon lias been subject lo nnd Is still subject to many mollvoi. A few predominate. Ttic rollcJous mo- tive wns fear. Religion began Iti fear Tbe traditional theology was hull clilePy on fenr. The appeal of the pulpit wns to tho fear In man. Kcnr tto longer-crcatcs or malntnlns Uio euuruli. The church, whleli Is ttio or ganlzcd machinery of religion, cxlit from higher motives. A second motive to the creation and maintenance of Uio dittrrli as Ihe ex ponent of religion M de- sire for companionship. The last RIK lilghrot, as It Ifl Utc latest, motive In creating and mntnfalnlng Iliu church 1 service. Tlin clmreh as a cenln: fo service roust Interest Itself lu Uie prob- lems of this world. Doing slop to nt what you eon do; go abend acd dc something. Some of tin are so Imprac Ural that we llko to tlilnk about thlggs bnt do not seem to have the power to map out H course of W Vf. Xcvlnn, Baptist Washington. D. C Wben faith and love fro to work to- gether they MVCT atop to think of UM wMlher. t between the United Spaioj bled conference at tha present time. IU efforts would naturally lie la the direc- tion of further codification of the unl- I venal Idcaa of right and Justice wblch wo call international law; mission would be to give them future effect. Tbe Pmldcnt directs that you will bring tha foregoing considerations to the attention of the minister for foreign af- fairs of Ibe HUTcrumrnt to which you urv accredited, and. In discreet confer- ence with him, ascertain to what extent tliat government U disposed to act In tha matter. _______________' MORE MONEY SPENT IN SCHOOLS Public of Country Increase JUpenilt turn bjr Thv report of the commissioner of ed- ucation for tba fiscal year ending June 30. 10W. made public by tha Secretary of the Interior, shows that puplb, or 11U per cent of tha entire popu- lation ot the country, attended the public schools dnrlnc that year. As compared with the previous six years percentage chows a alight de- crease In the number of pupils as com- pared wllh total population. Tba total cost ot tha public school sys- tem la given as This Is an lacrease of aver tha previous year. It amounts to per capita of total population and per capita per pupil. 1STO the proportion of male teachers has decreased from BO per cent of ths entire number to 20 per cent of the1 enUre number the past year. Tha enrollment In the private schools lor the year U given as By ABOUND -A BIG STATE INTERESTING ITEMS OF IOWA NEWS. LATE IgmUorles td the Acts of The Hapie Conference, nnd In part follows: The peace conference which nascm- led at The Hague on May 18. 3 BOO, rkcd an epoch In the history of na- Ions. Called by bin majesty the Em- eror of Itnssla to discuss tha prob- rms of the malntcnanca of general peace, jo regulation of the operations of war nd the lessening of the burdens wfalclf rcparedneas tor eventual war eutnlU pon modern peoples, Ita Inlmrw resulted u the ncccptnnca by the signatory pow- m of conventions for tho pescvlul ad- nstment of Intcrnntlonil dlfflcnltles by rbltratlou, and for certain humane mondmenta to the laws and customs of war by land and sea. A great work was Urns accomplished by the conference, while other phases of tha general sub- ect were left to dlicusslon by another conference la the-near future, such as Questions affecting tbe rights nnd duties if neutrals, tha Inviolability of private iroperty In naval warfare and the bom- lardment of ports, towns and villages by naval force. Among Uio movements wblch prepared be mlads of government for an nccord n the direction ot assured peace among men, a high place may fittingly he given n that set on foot by tho Interparlia- mentary TJnlon. From Its origin In. the suggestions of a member of the Urltlsh House of Commoas la 1SSS, U developed mill lu membership. Included large auni- >cra of delegates from the parllntnenta t the principal nations, -pledged to ex- ert their Influence toward the conclusion of treaties of arbitration between Ba- tons nnd toward the accomplishments of >eace. Its annual conferences havo no- tably advanced the high purposes It Bought to realize. Not only have many International treaties of arbitration bean concluded, hut. In the conference held a Holland In 1894, the memorable dec- laration In favor of a permanent court of arbitration WAS a forerunner of 'the most Important achievement of the peace" conference of The Hague In 1890. Tbe annual conference of tha Inter- parliamentary TJnlou-was held this year at Bt, Louis, In appropriate connection, with the world's fair. Ita deliberations were marked by the same noble devotion to the cause of peace and to the welfare of humanity which had Inspired Ita for- mer meetings. By tha unanimous vote of delegates, active or retired members of the American -Congress and of every parliament In Europe, with two excep- tions, the following resolntlon was adopt- ed: 'Whereas, Enlightened public opinion and modern civilisation alike demand (hat differ- ences between nittoai'shonldf be sdjadles- and settled la Ine ssma manner us dis- putes between Individuals an adjodlcated, namely, by the arbitrament ot rourts tn ac- cordance with recognised principles ot law, this conference reqants tne nverat gav- ernnxtntu of tie world to Kud to an International confcnaca, to be held at e time Mil place to bo up-fed upon by them for the purpose of caatlderlog: 1. Tha for tbe consideration of which tha conference at Tbe Hague ex- prMstfd a wlsb that a f ntnro confennct be called. 2. Tbe negotiation of arbitration treaties between tna uatlons represented at tbe con- ference to be coavened. 3. sdvlMblUty of establishing an lulernatloual congreu to convene periodi- cally fur lilKnislon of International questions. m And conference respectfully sod cor- dially fiquMts the President of tlie United fltntM to tovlte all ibe nations to Mad rep- resentatives to such a conference. On Uio 24th at altlmo, them resolutions were presented to the President bj a numerous deputation of tho Interparliamentary Union. Pres- ident accepted the charge offered to him, fesilag It to bs most appropriate that tho executive of the nation which had welcomed the conference to Its hospital- ity ihauld give voice to its utterances In a which the-Ameri- can government and people hold dear. He announced that ho would at an early day Invite other parties to Ths Hague conventions, la reassemble with a vlow to pushing forTard toward completion the nark already; begun at The Hague, by considering the questions which the first conference had left un- settled, with the express provision that thcre'shonld bo a second conference. In accepting this trust, the President was not unmlndfnl of tha fset, so vividly brought, homo to all the world, that a great war la now in progress. lie re- called the clrcunutanee that, at the time when, on Aug. 24, 1803, his majesty the Emperor of Itunsla sent forth Invita- tion to the nations to meet In the Inter- ests of peace, Ihe United States and Bpaln nad merely halted In their struggle to devlsa terms of peace. While at tba present moment no armistice between tha parties now contending Is In sight, the fart of an existing war Is no reason why thn natlona should relax tha efforts they hare so successfully mads hitherto to- ward tha adoption of rules of conduct which may make more remote chances of future wars between them. In 1806 the conference of Tha Hague dealt solely with the larger general problems whlek confront an nations, and anumed no fnnnten of tntenmtloa or sufcwttoq tWM tho addition of pupils In elementary echools, academies, Institutions for higher education, evening schools, Inifiluns schools, private kindergartens, Indian State schools and schools for de- fective orphans, the grand total of 187.018 pupils Is reported. TJie report estimates that tha average schooling given to each Inhabitant In 1870 was 072 dsys and In 1003 dors. The report shows that last year 132 colored children were enrolled In the common schools for that race In the for- mer sixteen slsva States and the District of The enrollment In 1877, tha first year ststlrtla were taken of tha colored schools, was Since 1870 It Is estimated that has been expended In the educa- tion of tha colored children In the former slave States and nearly for tha purpose for the white children of the samo section. Ninety-six reform schools are recorded, with Inmates, of whom nrn Icnrning useful trades. IN NATURE'S WONDERLAND. Tonrinc the Yaltowntone Now Irfme Dormant OcTserla Active. 'After being dormant for four years. "Splendid" geyser. In ths Upper Gerssr Biuln, Yelhrwatons Park, la again active, and Ita eruptions occur at the Intervals of about hoars. -General Passenger Agent A. M. Cle- lanfl" of tha Northern Pacific, who has returned from a trtp through.the lomrstoQn Park, Is very enthusiastic over the scenic beauties of ths big government rcserrs and much astonished at the ease nnd comfort with which the travel inside tho park boundaries is "Tho stags trip ot 150 miles Is arcom- pllaaed without ha said, "and tha hotel accommodations everywhere ara excellent. 'The naw hotel at Upper Gey- ser Basin Is a wonder to all the tourists visit It It Is of enormous alze, and bulk of logs throughout, the rustic np- pearauco bring preserved even In the gnest rooms. The ax, saw and hammer built tha entire structure.' Then Isn't a yard of plaster Jo tha aotlre bulUlnjr. Tha fireplaces ara built of big boulders, and the hotel Is pimply tha .rongh pro- duct of tbe forest? It Is extremely bun- tifuj. and hae every comfort, 'From the tawir a searchlight Is oper- ated. I saw Old Faithful by searchlight, and the sight wa? inn-jnlrtctat. One of ths featnres ot ths trip was to ace ths searchlight man chase ths bears with the powerful beam of light Tba bears are afraid of the-electric glare, and ran scored sheep whenever tha rays were tnrocd on them. On a dark night the searchlight develops many odd sod In- teresting aigtits." fitronc Worda Acalnat Chancellor UcCrockan, In his opening address dellvired In the chapel of New York University to more than 300 stu- dents, took occasion to rcbnke tbe ten- dency ot unruly college men to expend their Burpluu energies In lawlessness, and bullying underclassmen. On tbla UM he said: "Possibly the formation of such as I suggest may offer an outlet for tho superfluous energy which hi crerflow- lug in many college students ot tha be- ginning of the school year, especially among those who have Just become soph- omores. Such students often form clubs with the uunvowed object of commit- ting icts of a mischievous and criminal nature. From snob, orginlia- tlons arise cases of attacks by a dozen atont fellows upon eotne solitary victim picked for bnriag, or tba destrnotlon of public or private property. Tbe bert club lor such fellows.as thews Is ths pollce- moa'a clnb, nod the best meeting the ntatlon house or the bar of the police jndge." ___________________ Director Bago I'rcdleta llomuer Corn far Girt Iliiaa frtcturer KoumI Dead-Killed byTrala. J. It Snqc, director of the lowfl crop avrvlcv. (hot It will require nn- other mouth for HIP farmers of Ihe Stnlo to gvt tho corn crop out of the fields 111 order that It may he weighed nnd tbo rumlt of tho yi-nr'H work idiowa lo tho world for a tlinil limnrctlou of has doim for hiTKvtf anil the remuludrr of the iinlviTxo. Ilimklue Iisn received umcb attention no far, but lu miiuo locali- ties there haw been but little nctlvlty lu the corn Corn cutting ban pro- giciwcd lu Home communities wberu shock fcfdlue requires It, but fur tlie greater part the Htalkn bavu hvvu allowed to stand for the liUHklne pw of the husky farmer boyH wliu will IMMJII have the crop unfdy within doom before the HIIOW tileH with suinelcnt ctilll to prevent tbe gath- ering of the It fully bfllcvnt thnt nuch a purtlou uf tho crop IH wtfu as will CAillr cnnse the prnnj average reach very clone to ttic .'SOO.OOO.OOO mark, although there liart> IH-VII niunj predictions tn the end Hint there will be a shortage lu the crop mnuvnlirrc. The light which full In Krver.il locnll- ties, although not of coiuuitiicucv enough to cauHo any ban rise lo (earn that tho wirli will not reach tlio volume of Hint of the year lOOH, but them him boon plenty of evi- dence to ccinirnttlct thin utattuient by the khoivlnpi of thv 11 outlier ImriMii nnd the expeditions made by Prof. Ha CD hlnmolf upon which lie gathcml com from the worst frost bit ten sh.iivlng but llttlo damage. Prlsoncra Make a Punh. Sixty prlsouen contiiiLtl In the boune at Fort Den Molnes liuulela daub for liberty. Tlie fired on tha crowd, which had gnluctl Ihe nlr, and brought all to a halt but three. Two .of these were rilu iloiru by the guards. Private ThonmH, who wns considered the (AMent nniuer lu the reeliiipul. made good his escape. Several were Drexl at hltn, but It U uonc took, ef- fect. Col. Thiiiiins, the cuinmniidinc offi- cer, ImH ofTercd n reward of fur his arrest. The men wltliln tho guardhouw manufactured a from n case knife nnd Died loose tlio bnrs aver the window. Severn) hail elTected an escape from thu prison when the alnrm was Koundetl. ert Girl Fleea. The ni.vsti'rT of the dbnpiiparnnce of tho yoiiUK tlnimhter of II. A. Deck of Burlington U cleared somcvrlmt liy the diacorerr of a Dote lit irlilch nho said she would lenve home on account of mix- treatment. Her flrxt plnn wax to Co to St. by (rnln, but nftcrwitrd xlu' decided to take "a lone riilu III tho country." She wan Been nenr Mar- ket square with n xtmiiK" wonnin ami It IB bcllvvvtl slu1 left with her lu n farm waguu. Child KlllcJliyTrnln. An S-year-ohl nun of William Gnodson wns InHtautly fclllwl nnd Ills wife nmi danghtcr ivcre fatally tho re- sult of n rallrond crosolni; ncchU-nt ten miles from Ues JIolUL-x. Mru.t (Jooiliiun was ilrlvluc a rig nnd fulled to nco thv apliroachluj; Bock lu time tn avert tho aerlduilt, A --yeur-old child who was-In the rig with the other three was thrown twenty foot, but wcajied In- Jury. _______ Tonne Man Committed BulcMe. The illnnlipcnrnncc of Jo- Luwrence hern accounted for by tlie accldtntnl dlncovfry of hlx llfc- Ktui body hnnplns to the limb of a tree In n thicket nt wlllowii on tho old De Camp fami nbout n mile and n lialf north of Oriiiuell. The young man had com- mitted suicide while temporarily derang- ed. _______ In HUOdlcc. E. D. Wlntera, n iirninliienl Hurling- ton nmnufncturcr whono flrm recently foiled, was found dead In hln odlcc, liav- 1ns Inbaleil fuel Eas, It wan at firxt U'llcved that It "n case of suicide, lint the eoroner'H jury relurned n verdict of nccldental death. Bnltan ot Turkey baa seventy-oua titles. IClng Victor IDnxnaonsl Is cbs most expert and enthusiastic of royal motor- inU. QUMQ Alexaadn.'s eyes ars deep and retain tbe mingled softness and flrt of youth. The mother, Margberlta of Italy, Is preparing to maks a to Jerusalem. Tha Khedive of Egypt neither smoku cox drinks, la en early riser, and speaks six languages. Albert, reigning prince of Tbnrn and Toxii, vrnn s new salt of clothes every day and cravats a year. Lord of Malahlde hoa offered to seH Us eatats to Ala tanants under ths new Irish land act This la Mid to be the only of au Irish baroalaj aautt bi Una for ata aa4 a, haat Mti Wltbla Cnr Calhoun county nomi- nated a county tlekct. The lluros uiurdcr trial cost Dlack- hawk conuty leM than Jfearly BOO auliimobllo have been limued by tho St-crctary of State. Students Imva anil Kan- aau uulversltieJi may huld a debate. Iowa won more tlmn J3.100 In prlici on lier Imnei at the Si. Lauls An nllnr costing has plac- ed In the Catholic chur-h at Mt. Car- tael. Wat lias been apnolntoil nt Dudley, vice V. Ilassel- roolh, resigned. The great Jfonoun-IInrrlwn conuty dralnaec dllch, has been ordered dug, will cost nllackluK the constitution- ality of tho new drainage law liavo begun In Woodbury comity. 'The fiftieth anniversary of the orcan- Izatlon ot the CediJr Masonic lodge vus appropriately relrbratcd. thousand of various vs- have been In the CeJnv rirer at Walerlw nud Colar Falla Tho proposition to' bnue for the extension of the Coon Rnplds Water works wan defeated by a Vote of 98 to 02. Thieves broke a window In tlie Trice Jewelry ntare at Clinton ami mado away with several gold watcli casts. A proposition to a wnnty frOor farm will be voted on la b8ga county At the couilne eleetlon. Guy Hamilton nntl Sherman were fined fTX) nnJ costn at Waterloo for throwing a dead liorac Into thr river. There are several casca of diphtheria at Waterloo and precautions It prevent the spread of tbe dlneisc are being taken. Friends of Wlliktm Brink of Daven- port caused him tn be sent fl letter In- forming Um that he hail fallen hrir to 140.000 by the death of a. ri-lntlva In Iloston. had mads prvparatleiw to ft when tbe bou was dtocuvarad. The Country Club hotue at Cllntoa burned; 1.000. Tho jtoMnniee at I.aiiranltr has bean mall to Slguurury. Council IlluITi hsvu 000 wltu which to IiullJ aud A lull. Fire bsdly daiirasnl the of tha Ljoun Stock Cmiiiwny at Cllutou. nn the Carueele libraries at Waterloo will nut bo livcuii until nprlng1. A full furre of mm iiuir lu Itix-k Inland aboiin at Yallsy 'Junc- tion. II. J. McKarland of hnn bren rcvrlvvr ot the Ulxou bank, Tha JuluiMli comity board of stiper- vlwirs have Inaugurated a Btuue pile for vagrants. The work of trilling the right of way of ills Naw Vleuua suj Uycrnvllle road has lifcuu. Thirty machine In thr Matt- son glore factory at Mason Clij' struck for tuora pay. The Iowa Telephone Ounpanr will elect a new brick ullfce build- lue at Kvokuk. A lores portion of I ho burneil orctlou will bo rebuilt 111 n uiurc sub- stantial manner. It U CTtimnte4 the Stnte will inhnHtiliee tax tbe of the late Jsmes Callalian. Ttirkeys are reported warco In north- westtm Iowa, nnd famine iirli-ci urn pre- illetrd for tho Thanksgiving seuiwu. Sidney Smith ot UurlliiKtmi wan taken htfore tbe feilcrnl eunrt at Kvokuk nnd fur throucb the mall. Thousands or small fi'li are hcliig tak- cu from lil.ickhawk creek ami uelcblior- luc Jionds nud tiayous at Waterloo and placed In tlio Cedar rlrcr. The voters of Cherokee county ore be- ing asked to vote at the cumliiK election for fJO.OOO lauds fur the purpose of building a jail and slierllTs olllce. In Polk county District Court Mrs. Cumle Mcl.nlu of hat xucil Nel- son a uealtliy nelRhbor, for yiri.OOO ilamacea for alleurO Ubel. A Waterloo niotbfr eavo him a lllhle thirty yean ago, wns promptml by curiosity to open tlie hook this week and fuuud thrrciu a five dollar Grafters representing a fake medical eoneeni of Chicago nucccmleil In securing tlie signatures of many farmers near Buffalo Center to notes for various amoonts. Fifty Rlrls.ot Uio Mattson glove fac- tory In Slsson City struck for higher wnsw. Tho factory refuseil lo pny Inex- perienced apprentices more than tlio pres- ent nolle. Jauics Donahue, found icullly of par- tic Hinting in highway rubbery, was sen- tenced to three yeflrn In the penitentiary at Kurt Mntilsou by Judge McIIenrr of CS Molucs. A youth at Ilolnntl was drnggcil halt a Uille by a runaway horse. Ilia foot cnugbt In tbe stirrup of the animal ha was riilluff nnd be was terribly Injured, but tuny recover. Manila's town gas lighting plant has bcni conditionally solj lo a syndicate of local ennlrallBbf. A special election.will be held la grant the company a frjuchlw for twenty-llvo years. An organized lemJ ot bnrglarj) lias ter- roriied Kast Des Molncx. A score ot humen have liecn eiitereil. Nearly every honae lu one entire block has been rob- bed. Chloroform la used. The auction sale of the Muacatine North and South road ban been again postiwlicd to Dec. IS. It Is understood a bid of was nmile b; Muncatina imrtles, which was refuneil. Tbo man who was murdered In Des Molnes by a negro lias been Identified ax Fred Doylo of Belle Fountain, Ohio, where he formerly lived. The negro, Chan. Morten, who killed him, Is held In jail to await trial. August Swnnnon, living with bin broth- er upon n farm two miles south of Val- ley Junction, drank a pint of carbolic ucld and died in horrible agony. He was despondent nnJ believed every body-want- ed to client him out ot his property. A -crusade agalnat cigarettes Is being started by teachers of tbe Slate. Tbe law prohibiting the sale ot cigarettes In Iowa Is strict, but dealers mako a com- mon practice of violation It. Anti-cigar- ette elulm are to be orgaulicd atnoutf ths pupils of tbe schools. Mrs. IWIAC A. Magev, wife of a farm- er nrar Athens, and her 10-year-old son were, killed by an unknown iwrson, wbo cut their UironU. Poises have been hunting for a negro who Is tfhpposed to have committed Ihe crime. A man nam- ed Cralghlieud, half-brother of Ml Bee, baa been nrrtisU-1. Punlnbment has overtaken the' train n-bbeni who held up thu Huck Island fait passenger near Letts early last month, ni-eordlliK to the confcmlon mado by William alias Dlalr, no he lay upon what will probably be bin dsath bed In a St. Lduln hospital. Morrla la the leader of the three suspects who en- gaged la n desperate battle with Stt Louis detectives. Believing that ht was about lo die, Morris made a clean breast of hta misdeeds, among them being ths Letts holdup. lie claims that the rob- Uers got nothing for their palus. After fonr days' experience-under tha Influence, of soinu powerful ilrnv, Joseph Carr of Molnes woke up while, be- Inc catricd In n nurxery wagim betwesn Harvey Junction and Ottumnra. The driver was n stranger to Carr, anil ha rpfnoed to talk. Carr remembera drink- Ing with strangers in a Des MoJnes saloon and a spell of drowsiness coming on blni. Shortly after Carr raum to the driver and Ms wiiton disappeared while Carr wan out In tlie road trying to get his bcaringx. lie bail some mnney when drugged, but waft dressed In old clothes and pcinilleos when bo discovered wit. Troops L and M ot the Eleventh United flmtw cnvnlry have arrived a the new quarters for them n Fort Dei Molnes. Since their retnra from the PMllpplnea lout February th troops hare been stationed at Jcfferao barracks. No work will be done on Ihe Stale In- stltnthm tor dipsomaniacs.at KnoxvlIIe tble jenr. Too Stale board his foua It Impoaslble to get tbe ready I time tor work this fall, bat the conlrsc will be let during the winter so that work be commenced early In taw coming rear.   

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