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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - December 12, 1890, Lemars, Iowa                                mm VOL. XX, Na99. LE MABS, IOWA, FKIDAT, DEQEMBEE 12, 1^J90. ISSUED SEMI-WEEKLY. $2.00 PER YEAE BOUE AS IT WAS. THE Gold Medal-the finest carpet sleeper tljat ttie Bis-eel Co. iriaKe-is tised intTA^elve Royal Palaces arid in :r\early tvio iiTindred tliousand tioines, Fo dtlst -Witli It,; no riotse, no Ttiear on carpets, no carpet t]:\at tfsiJill nots-weep and s-Weep It dean, Take one on trial. boub as it m, �; Make your wife happy by getting one of these sweepers at Spring Bros., for a Christmas present to her, They also invite your attention to F,, EGANT PICTURES, STEEL ENGRAVINGS, Lithographs and other kinds, FRAMED and READY to HANGUP. A magnificent assortment ROCEEBS, CHAIRSi WRITING DESKS, BOOK CASES, etc.j just What you want for HOLIDAYS. SKATES, SLEDS, POCKET CUTLERY, Carving Sets, Rogers Bros. PLATED KNIVES AND PORKS. Spring Bros,, Hardware and FDrnitnre, LE MARS, IOWA. ' LYON, POnER & CO., 174 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. la the Urgast Piano and Organ Houae In tbe Wwt. BOLE bEAl4EBB IM Steinway&Sons, I. B. Chatt,     ^, �;�"..   Pianos Geo. W. Lyon, and Webster, A. B. Ghaie and Wilcox & White Organs. Aiso the Wonderful Vpcallon Organ Correspondence and Inspection Solicited.:! m^.Do not confuse THE Mutual Life Insurance' icomrany of new york, 1�fewitfiA:anykothe6Company ' ;of apparently, similar name, but less niagnitude, /'' , Bear iii ^miij'd^Jthat.there!' is no Life Jnsurance^com-" 5pany called ''yhe^-'New/ "    York  Mutual' Life'" and' IZ^ that there is no Lite, Irisur^;/ '^^;^ance 'Company 'chartered $tate of NewYc^kp ized''4o   use* the AL in its title OF IKELiND. The Old Leader Received as a Conquering Hero in Dublin. IIEALY IS  BURNED' IN  KFFIGV. riie Omce oC UiiUuil IreliiiKl Tiikoii Vm-aeMlon of by FaruoU, Wiio lAJocU tlio Kditora and Itiirni^an Edition-A Itii; Day in Dublin. GENERAL NOTES. Pa., DonuN, l;eo. U.-Mr. Parnell, aa one of the directors of United Ireland, has seized upon the plant of that paper, prevented tlie publication of its current edition and ejected the acting editor. Mr, Parnell's agent then took possession of the premiaes. United Ireland is the paper of wlucli Mr. William O'Brien, one of the Irish Nationalist delegation now in New York, is the editor. The anti-Parnellitea have been discussing a proposition to secure full control of the paper and issue it as the organ of their party in Ireland. When Mr. Bodkin, who is actintr as editor in charge during the absence of Mr. William O'Brien, entered the office of United Ireland and found Mr. Parnell in possession, Mr. Purnell read the articles of the association under which the company was organized and then instructeii tlie sheriff to eject Mr. Bodkin. This that officer immediately proceeded to do, It was no easy matter to accomplish, however, as the acting editor offered a stubborn, if ineffectual resistance. In the down stairs oiiicea desperate encounter took place between the sheriff and his deputies and the sub-editorial staff, every man of which rushed to the assistance of their chief. In the melee sticks and cudgels were freely used, and stools and ink bottles, paper weights and other articles- of office furniture were hurled through the air. It was only after a prolonged and desperate struggle that the editors, grimly fighting every inch of the way, were finally thrust out ot the premises. The news of. the fight spread rapidly all over the already excited capital, and withi n a wonderfully short time the office of United Ireland was surrounded by an intensely interested crowd.   '. Later in the day Mi*. Parnell appeared at the office of the paper and addressed the staff,- which,- after hearing his statement,;. promise d to serve hira.' It appears that Mr. Leamy, subeditor of the United Ireland, having received an intimation of Parnell's intentions with regard to the paper, had arranged' to issue an edition of the paperin advance of the regulai' hour �of. publication.. His purpose was, how-. ever, /frustrated^ by?the audde n arrival of Mr. Parnell.    ' Mr. Parnell immediately ordered the destruction of the entire edition, which '| was about to oe issued to the public at the moment of his arrival. It contained bitter attacks upon Mr. Parnell's recent conduct and policy.'' Mr. Parnell is the owner of 474 of the 500 shares of the stock of The United Ireland company. The reinaui-ing twenty-six shares are owned by Dr. Kenny, member of the house of commons tor South Cork, and a friend of Mr. Parnell's, and Mr. Justin McCarthy, leader of the anti-Parnellites. The gentlemen of the staff' who were violently ejected will at once institute proceedings against.Mr. Parnell for as-r sault. : Bodkin, in an interview, said the edi-: tion destroyed contained many resolutions: adopted by the provincial branches opposing Parnell. It contained- also a. cable dispatch from: O'Brien saying:   -      ; . .'I insLst moderately but firmly, upon Parnell's retirement." ' ^Mutual Life .A Grand Ovatluii. London. Dec. II.-Parnell arrived at Kingston early and was met on the pier by a bodyguard of 200 of his followers, who had traveled from Dublin in a special tr.iin.. Timothy Hualy and Maurice Uealy, members of parliament and opponents of Parnell, f traveled in the same boat with Parnell from Uulyhead, As they came ashore they were subjected to hostile demonstrations, by the crewd on the pier, wliile there, were shouts for Parnell mingled with cheers tor Mrs. O'Shea. A number of addre-sses were presented to Parnell, in reply to which he expressed his thanks for the welcome. .He said he did fear the results of not the figlitiwbichrfae.bad undertaken. : Ho ihad':uever'led:the.Irish; party wrong in: they'past'iand would not do so in the future. The train, after a shoU run, arrived 'at Dublin, where a large crowd had assembled to welcome Par-; uell. The 'crowd was so dense that Parnell 4>fficul^y madef;:hiBy way: throinigh it. Finally he (reached a I cab, > which he entered-with< Kenny,'meiu-;^ ber of parliament. /The crowd sax-rounded .%theJ^i^(�lK^'|jiah^ :horse s, and theni^^nieiL's enthnsiastic< admirers drew him^thrdngh: the streets^ until they reached HJr.'Kenny'a, house, i ;vin themeantime ,/'B,tarted 'for' the ;hall,  and, dragged the^yebicle thither with their': o,wn'hands, escorting' Mr. Parnell   Albert H. Smith; of Mills, Bobesou: & Smith, who wrecked that firm by committing forgeries, was sentenced at New York to seventeen years in state prison. Dr. Mary . Walker, who was reported dying, is much improved. She said she was determined to. live until she obtained justice at the bands of the government. The noted trotting stallion Electioneer died at the Palo Alto farm in California. He was afi years old, and had sixty-une sons and . daughters, in the a:Wli8t. The earnings of the New York-Brooklyn bridge for the year were-$1,239,494; 87,776,411 passengers crossed the structure, of which number 3,323,-07S were on foot. At Coaticooke,: Que., fire destroyed iproperty.valned at $90,000. The j)rin-r cipal losers are retaiK grocers and dry goods dealers.on Main street.' There .is-Bil.insurance of$.?0,000.^ 1 < ' ^'^tvFargo; ? Ni iD^; ithei Beyili^lliain P. Fisher-of Minneapolisiwas acquitted; of forgery. It wa�, charged that he Bignea a name'in: a'real; estate ,trauBac% tion with intent to defraud. " ' " .( Louis Bbodes and Edward Taylor: fcwerei: killed and 'Stewart vBooth'waai Berionelyinjnredby being;;rnn :down vby a freight' whiter returning^ to their^ homes near Sewlckley, Pa.     \ ' Mrs. Susan Ehlin of Buffalo, 'N, Y., : has brought suitagainst Dr.' Samuel N. Braytou, a prominentrphysician for^ $10,000 damages for alleged inalprac-i; tice in the treatment of vrheumatism;!^ ' Henry_'H. Spieker, late bookmaker! ;for;TheTribune,German:tpa^erof; St, Lonis, has left for parts nnkhown,!^ Hisrbooksshow.a deficiency :;theiexact| amountof .v^Mchdsn <;..,Tliiagro^ earnings of the Union*Pj^! icifib5for;QctoWBr!Svero? t4;306i603; vnstjS il',^a,69R 'J,For theVirti-montbei tp Ooi| tober 41"the' gross^ear^ipgs woie $35,- = ,8�9,743,^ andfvthe netrearnings . $ia,-r^ oi^.m. '-v -     ,;-v,.s   : t , The nnited labor council of the port-fo^Iidodoitihasyfisned^a.'manifes^^ do)ring;^�^f8tr^kejHwhip|i will affect^ 'ambnMptn�rv^el.iowne,r8, the Sh(kw-; |SeTi||e oompanyArlie Ifew l^ealand oo?n-PW&SP^MB'lt'B^'In^ittn Navigation .4,^------^'^k^iijie?;!^^ mlv?iinion paen.r�' i^Sg4-ih'eW.^S Galena ore has been found near Baldwin City, Kan. \ -,� " Minister Fred Donsla.s, accompanied by his wife, sailed 'for Hayti,on the steamer Prins Maurits. The Bank of London and Chicago Is soon to be established in Chicago with a capital stock of $1,000,000; The Boston Homeopathic Medical Booiety advocates the use of chloroform in killing prisoners sentenced to death. At Abilene, Kan., the Lash hotel, the Bon Ton livery stable and SQme adjoining buildings were burned; Loss, $50,000. Col. Herbert, C. B, of - the British army, has been appointed to the command of the Canadian militia to succeed Gen. Middleton. At St. Louis Maud Whitelaw (rf.2005 Thomas street, was fatally burned while cleaning a dress with 'gasoline near an open fireplace, ' : Senator Sawyer of Wisconsiti will retire from public life at the Expiration of his present term in 1898, He will then be 77 years old, ;' , A bill appropriating $50,000 for the construction of a public building at Toledo, O,, was introduced iu : the. house by Representative Hay.nes of Ohio. The Rev. J. C. White, the /oldest Presbyterian minister in Cincinnati, died at the age of 85 years. He had been stationed there for nearly fifty years, Morr.'son McClelland, aged ,70, the veteran turfman and father of: Byron McClelland, died at Lexington, Ky. Mr,' McClella,nd had been a trainer for fifty years, ' : The Woodward Lumber and/ltfanu-facturing company, Chattanooga, made an assignment. The liabilities are $84,000, nearly half of which/is due to Chattanooga banks. Judge Andrew and Roberta-Smith, farmers living near Linwood; -Mich,,, quarreled over a piece of timberj when the latter raised his ^un and)' fired, killino: the former instantly.     1 The mills of the Coventry^ ipotton Spinning company at Coventry;-Eng., have been damaged by fire to the extent of many: thoiisands' of pounds. The fire thi-ows 200 hands out of employment. . :; A combination has been formed to control the cheap lodging hotifees of Boston, known as "FriendlV jinns," Steps have been taken to 'e^ablish houses in Portland, Worceste^. and Providence, 5\i: At Crpthersville,, Ind., W, C: Iferad-ford, 80 years old, and partly demented, arose at 4 o'clock in the morning arid set the house on fire; His bq|}y was entirely consumedt. His wife nairrowly escaped death,   '^�'^ i; Reports to the Elihbis state bbard of agriculture call attention to the ravages of Hessian fly in winter wheat. The destroyer has been found ili:Sangamon county, even in wheat sown in corn stubble. Figaro of Paris says _ the prbposed marriage between the Duke of'Orleans. and Archduchess Marguerite Sophie of Austria has finall'V been : abandoned. The duke will serve for one year in the Russian ar^^y.' ' ' � ./^l : day Dec. 11, and it is*-expected the casion will be improved to give the learned professor both an official and popular recognition of his great service to humanity, Succi passed the thirty-first day of his fast cheerily. His weight was 113 pounds, a loss of thirty-five and one-quarter in the thirty-one days, and he h|is fallen off one-half inch in statare in the same period. The town of Hebronville, R. L, is greatly excited over the simultaneous disappearance of Superintendent Jdi. H. AuU of Knight's cotton mills arid pretty Nellie Hagan, a mill girl. Aull has a wife and children. Commenting on the passage of the copyright bill by the' United States house of representatives the London NeWs congratulates America on having taken a great forward step in ihterna-tiorial honesty a,nd justice. Ten thousand dollars'worth of diamonds belonging to Mrs. Kirk Brower have been stolen in a mysterious manner from a Kansas City safety deposit vault. Detectives have been unable to discover any trace Of the thief. S. Kennedy Tod, of the firm of S. Kennedy Tod:& Co., bankers of New York, has been elected president of the Calumet Canal a, rid Improvement company and of the Standard Steel and Iron cpmpauy, with offices in .Chicaigo. Internal revenue officers recently de-.stroyed in Winston county, Alabama, 'the largest illicit still ever operated: in the southern states, . Its capacity was 100 gallons a day. The government tax on this output would have been $114 a dav. � Horace Rowsee, of the firm of Wm. Bryant & Co., grain aridjprovision merr chants of Shelbyville.Tenn,. dropped  dead on the street. Heart failure was the cause of death. His father fell dead some years ago from the same cause,-".-, ���.�.:.�: �'.�:: At the regular meeting of Plymouth church, Brooklyn, it was voted to re-: :tain as a member of the church Forger^ "AlbertiH; Smith, who is - under sentence of seventeen years in Sing Slug for ruining the-firm of liMlills, Robeson.& Smith. i.The elevator cable in the wholesale dry goods bonsn:: of :Samnel DaviSv & Co. in St. Louis, hroke.and theelevatoir oar fell'from' the fifth floor to the first; .Richard.Collins^ B. �D. Mears,-D. H^ Wdodsrarid'itwd other occiiparits were badly injured. 1 ' Dr.^ Joseph(J. Kinyon jpassed;assistant Burgeon of the. marine hospital service;: has beencommissioned, by President Harrison to go: to Berlin and study; ! Prof. Koch's, system of, treating conr-Bumption.vivDriKinyoniwill sail on the; 10th inst.;  y Survivors of tlio Wbotbnrnis. PiULADRLPUiA, Dec. 11,-There hag reached this city through a, private ch.annel the thrilling story of the loss of .the British steamship Westburne in the Black sea. Of the vessel's crew of twenty-live, four are all that survive, and these are miserable wrecks of humanity, prostrated in an Oilessii hospital under the care of the British consul. The Westburne, an ordinary tramp steamship, Jleft The odosla soiith-ea.st of Crimea, Nov, 2-1, ladon with linseed, bo und to Dunkirk and I hence to Philadelphia, with a general car^jo. On the evening of her departure a gale pa-culiar to-the Black sea alone arose. The weather grew so inteiis-'ly cuH that the men were frozen to death in a lifelike posture at wherever their duty called'them. Every sea tlial^ swept over the ve.ssel Croze to Iwv, making iier sJuggisli and so heavy that .she refused to ride the waves and became unmanageable, VVlien the water gained entrance to the hold tlie cargo be,i{an to swell, and broke open the decks fore and aft us though jjowder had been: exploded in her. At midnight, although only a few hours out of port, the vessel began to go down. Already the corpses of a number of seamen were visible about the deck, standing against the hand-rails just as erect as though in full vigor. With all the crew that still lived the captain put out in a small boat and headed her to Odessa some fifty miles, during the early morning. They died off one by one till reaching Odessa the following night, and they were reduced to eight. Four died while undergoing treatment, leaving but four survivors, Capt. Bennington the commander of the Westburne, is well in Philadelphia, He is completely iri'bstrated by his sufferings in the boat and by the death of his brother, the ship's chief officer. Overdue Weatlier-beaton SteamerH. Ba LTiMOiiE, Md., Deo. 11, -Several overdue ocean vessels have arrived and all of them report a more or less stri ous experience with the great hurricane which swepet the ocean about Deo. 1. The bark Amy, which arrived from Rio .Janeiro, was caught. Before it was over she had lost a seaman and her cargo shitted, her sails were torn and everything on deck started. On Nov. iiO the .bark was struck by a hurricane that lasted four liours, ' Its fury was appalling, Richard Cain, a seaman aged 20, of Sheffield, Eng,, was swept away. A few moments later another wave swept over thfj Amy. It ciutght Second Mate John Wilson, and in a moment he was out in the sea. As the bark struggled to right herself a returning wave struck lier, and when she had sliaken it from her deck the crew were surprised to see Wilson clinging to a rope. The returning wave had brought him back. Thebarkjulia Rollins, which arrived 'rf.''Q,m-,RiO.. was also caughjjn, the storm iaiid scudded tjefdre the wind: for fflv6~ hour.s. On her way out the Rollins lost a seaman known as Louis, a native of Italy. The North German Lloyd steamship Hermann arrived from,..! Bremen wth 728 immigrants. They experienced a very rough voyage. The Arkell Kxplorliig Party Lost. New Yokk, Dec, 11.-A special from San Francisco intimates that the Arkell exploring expedition in Alaska hiis po.ssibly.been lost. A two inoriths' old letter from lOne of the party has been received at San Francisco much belated, stating that the party is known to be snowbound. Haas tc Huebsch, -DEA r.EllS in- HARDWARE, h STOVES, TlN'NVAKK, cutlerv, ammunition, EtC, EtC. "VISIT US," It will pay yeu to look over our New and Elegant Line of Stoves, and get our prices befere purchasing elsewhere, we have the largest stock in the city. Bought von Casit, and bought right, and will be sold right. Cash or No Cash System. Wo will not be undersold by anybody in our line of business; this is plain talk and we mean it. OUR MOTTO IS:   "Bbst Goods. Lowest Prices," -bbmembeu the place- HAAS & HUEBSOH, N. Main St. LeMars, lo. 400 Kinds of Pocket Knives. Largest Stock of Cutlery of all Kinds in the North\vcst. Silver-Plated Ware -Hard and Soft Goal- New Stock at Very Close Prices, 93ttf San Fkancisco, Dec.  11.-Eastlund, Fowler & Co., wholesale .glassware dealers, failed. Liabilitie.s, !iiI93,000; assets, $53,000, LATiM MARKET riUOES. Oinaba I.ive Stock. Union Stock YAnns.   (. OsfAHA, Deo. 10.1 CJATTIjIC-Ksliinatiirl rocoipts. ],7.5u heart. Prime heavy, $-l.a)a-t.-l.'>: ih(!(Uuin heavy, $3.85 (a4.ilO; comimin, �',1.4l)a3,80; clioico tiineycowa aiid lieif U: - common to medium <; 0: :modium to, i!Xli'ii;'Sl.,7fKaVW:JaJiUis, S;i.,wa5^ r.UAlN   AND  1'KOVI.SION  MARKBTS. Ohicaeo.  � diirdAnn..D.-r,^"10.^Tbe hulls �:coul(V readily HiHlerstaiiilVvJij�rMa:ywheiit-^ seHiuVto $l,(ki to-day.' :At It was, tliolulVance stopiiej atOHc, J6e over: tlio olosoilast iDigUt -and jfic.over (lie.(iponins (lUnre. Mayopened wliereil. (dosed at lt.'ij(i(\ louolied B3J40, .sold at: 08jSu:tpfl8'*^e tol)i)p,l6!18>(lo l.o.flSMn to 98>^d at I o'clock. :'Mify .closed: atflSJ^c, or i     ^ : labor. THE ACORN STOVES CLAIM ALL THIS, No scrap iron is used; every known im-�Drovement is added; only the highest grade of labor is used. It is therefore no wonder that Always Work Well. Everyone Praises Th.em, And they a,re the model other makers cOpyfroin. f A Large Assortment can be Seen at WATKINS & COMPAN�. ComiTieroial S^in Leeds, AUTOORIZED CAiPimL; Iowa. ,v PAID-IN CAPITAL, 185,000 OFFICERS: 0. SEVAN OLDPIELD, Prcsideiit, HENRT:iRELNrHART, Vice-President. S. H. MOORE, Cashier.  ^ C'i:Si;i#Mi- /:,VGorrespojidenfeeidi^ \ -'b. ^''''""�t V    .-'^trV':.-^'�^j'-:^..'':n:'i:i'^^  aa.0#ihgtothelSw'pHoirofTrfirin produce uqd-thecliidomarElnni ne*i 1 have LOiiLludLd to oiler unii8uaLlnUuMn�|ni^f^ thn Luuing wonoa. Bring In your cwSf^S^^^' tlin Luuing woxoa. UrinK In your cash aodlwil ard grades. Yuu wil Ififd jt to ymt Interest txf^   

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