Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

LeMars Sentinel Newspaper Archive: June 17, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: LeMars Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - June 17, 1890, Lemars, Iowa                                4/ VOL. XX, NO. 48, LE MARS, IOWA, TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1890.   ISSUED SEMI-WEEKLY. $2.00 PER YEAR HIDES! HIDES aides, Felts,   Furs Wool and Tallow. ^W. M. CLAGG & CO., . Bnilding north of VIovd Barn on Eaxlo Street. FRED P. WHITNEY, CITrPLVflBEfllHDGU FITTER -dbatjEH in- BATH TUBS, SINKS, IRON AND LEAD PIPES, WASH BASINS, WATER CLOSETS, FITTINGS '   * AND BRASS GOODS LAWN SPRINKLERS AND FOUNTAINS. HOYT & GOUDIE. THRiiABRME Sightseers Transformed Into a Mass of Struggling Humanity. 4  iped for   WoBt. U^toToriSgtthfA'Ywiibnie tlmltMl. -oairicB the finestBleeitiBBscarai^and'ooaahee ever built, and also all oUsfea ot paasepgers, without ztra fares. On the take SajMrior.DQrtion of the llnei betwmn Minneapolis/fBt^lPaia and P 'andSti PaQland^A8hlpnd,:.Pil|lnian;-8)eoper8'are: Cleveland, O., June 16.-Two hundred people were hurled from a broken foot bridge in Beyerle's park at 6 o'clock last night and piled in a stmggling mass on the sloping sides of a guUey or precipitated into the bed of the stream sixty feet below. Forty persons received more or less severe cuts and contusions, some of which may prove fatal. The crowd had been drawn to the park by the announcement that a man named Bellar would jump from a cable stretched from the cliffs to, the artificial lake, nearly 100 feet below. One of the best points of obsei-vation was from a foot bridge across a gnlley sixty feet high. This frail sti-ncture, some seventy feet in length, was packed with men, women and clnldren. Suddenly, with a loud crash, the overweighted stringers snapped and the 200 occupants of the structure vi^ere pitched headlong into the ravine. Men, women and children fought their way out of the heap as best they could, trampling on those below and crushing down those who impeded their progress. When the last person had been rescued from the pile it was found that all but ten of the victims were able to go to their homes unassisted. The others were taken by the ambulances to the hospitals or their homes. Some of the ten have internal injuries that may prove fatal. Following is the list of the seriously injured: Jaues SANFono, 63 years, right leg fractured and internal Injuries, probably fatal. Rmjoi-PH WoODRicii, 28 years, right leg fractured and head bruised. AIiis, RuiJOLPU Woobiiicii, spine lind shoulder Imrt. Jesse Caldweu.. it years, ankle tcaoturod and arm badly injured. Beutha MuNTEli, 15 years, right lilp fractured and internal injuries. Anna Tboman, 13, years, right ankle broken. Mart Thoma!!, 22, years back and head injured. Unknown one legged man, leg broken. Struck by I^lghtiiini;. Paris, Ky., June 16.-A terrific lightning and thunder storm passed over the nortliern part of this county. Two of a fishing party were killed and two others badly injured. They took shelter under a couple' of cattle troughs. Lightning Btruck the troughs and Joseph Speaks, aged 18, and Lish Wilson, colored, aged 15, were killed. Blanton Speaks � was badly burned about the face and one of his eyes was forced fi-om its socket. Edward Kennedy was also stunned and dazed and knew nothing for several hours, although able to walk home, a a distance of two miles. He was unable to talk or give any account of his companions. After a while Blanton Speaks gotliome. All he could say was, "the trough," meaning that the other boys could be found at the trough. He has since been unconscious and will probably die. � Terrible Tliinider Storm at CInoliinatl. Cincinnati, June 16.-A terrific thun der storm passed over this city between 12 and 1 o'clock, doing considerable damage, especially to the macadamized streets. The down-pour of rain was 1.36 inches an hour and many of the streets had the appearance of canals. Edward Lanahan, aged 50, who lived at No. 10 State stieet, was washed into a sewer and drowned while trying to remove obstructions from the opening to let thQ water through. His body was recovered. He leaves a widow and five childien. At Fairmouut, a suburb, one house wa� damaged to the extent of ' $'500. In the western part of the city a new sewer sustained damages to the .amount of !|a,500. Telephone and electric light wires were down in all directions. � i:.niiisvillo Uelnged. Louisville, Ky., June 16.-Daring the heavy storm which deluged this city, a street car on the Seventh street line, standing near the Union depot was Btruck by lightning. The front platform was' shattered and the driver, .James P. -Bice, severely and probably fatally injured, r The receiving warehouse at J. B, Wathen & Co's., distillery was struck by lightninsr and completely destroyed, ]t>y> the.ipre which followed. Loss,, f)lnc:^]^^je^9:the^'iwarehonse, and about Beven^iliousand.gallons of new whisky, |l!i,()00,-fa]lyin8ured. At.,PlttfbiirK., Pittsburgh, Pa.,' June 16.-A severei wind and rain. storm, accompanied heavy thunder j audi lightning . over this city ' at ^'8,j o^ldck. O'NeU' carriage shop in'^Bawrenceville was blown down, c�using/a loss : of several tltousand dollars.: Railroad and street car tracks were also considerably damaged.       _ fSxT"-"tT�nni�St trains'^ -NORTH-WESTtRJS? *< -JB>itthrongh trains are also nm betr"-""f apoUs. St. Paul and Kansas City,.Tia > *jwith- PaUman Bleepet�,j;he entire Kansas City, Saltljake, Ban ^.jii^nvjoigbD'and____.___________,....... trains oyer this line between ~ Ihibwo.''Besides being ^pining pars are ran on' Drowned In Winnobaeo. oshkosh,* Wis., June 16,-While Miss EmmaiPomeraning, her brother, ,and. a friend were sailing on Lake vWinneb ago, their boat was capsized and P^lssPomeraning, aged J6, was drowped, 'On^^ghting the boarher body,was dis-covered-'peneath, with the hands ^till, ^cljiisping one of the ropes. ^     jW bdenware ^Jfaotory Burned S OsHKOSHf Wi?., June 16.-The plant of iTie'iimaaut^M bodenware company: was 4e8trpy�l*iKlfi^-, The .huildmgsl hnmed'i&clndelit^iBplMr.miU," cooper shop repair Bh'oiM>Td%inr�l^opke of Idlns. The'loM':iB?6lj9M|B0^9Qp- witV '$80,000 insurance. ',' , Washington, June 18.-Capt,'c9.-.^i5(^ JlarVe, a''civil engineer of this'^*'' coinmitted-suicide. Overwork' inl THE DUTY; ON WOOI- The Consumers' Association Ask for Total Abolition of Duty. Boston, June 16.-The Wool Consumers' association have sent to the senate .finance committee at Washington a memorial in which they say: "For the protection of the woolen manufacture of the country, and for its rescue from a most hampered and depressed condition, we ask for a great reduction or the total abolition of the duty on wool." The memorialists proceed with an elaborate argument in favor of this proposition, in the course of which they say: "A free selection fronr many varieties of wool is essential for the manufacture of the cloths required by the trade, and the exclusion of foreign wool interferes with the necessary supply of raw material as to reduce rather than increase the quantity of American wool used." In conclusion the memorialists say: As all the wool grown in the world is now wanted, the American grower could hardly be injured by the readjustment of values. If, at the worst, his product should fall slightly in price, he would be compensated soon by . the larger and more certain demand from the stimulated and increased manu-facme, The demand for mutton is rapidly increasing, and mutton is afforded better quality by sheep which produce long wool than by the breeds producing short, fine wool. The half-breed mutton sheep's wool in the warp works admirably with the rejected worsted fibre and the Montevideo fleeces in the fill; ing. Thus the mutton flocks would be stimulated through the importation of free raw materials. The Ameridiin consumer of woolens and worsteds would get better fabrics at prices generally lower." AN IOWA coyvENTioy. All Grades and Shades of Antl-HIbnopllstM to Meet at Des Moines. Des Moines, June 16.-A state convention has been called to meet at Des Moines, Aug. 4, for the nomination of state officers. It is called by the chairman of the Union Labor state central committee,' but all others are invited who believe in the declaration of the purposes enunciated by the industrial conventions held al Cincinnati Feb. 22, 1887,. and May 15, 1888, and who desire to co-operate for the maintenaiice of the platform formulated and promulgated by the National Farmers' alliance, industrial unions and Knights of Labor at St. Louis in December last, which made the following demands: 1, Abolition of national banks and substitution of legal tender trea-snry notes in volume sufficient to do the business of the country on a cash basis. 3. Abolition of board of trade gambling. 3. Free and unlimited coinage of silver. 4. No alien ownership of land. 5. Equal rights to all and special privileges to none:. 6. Fractional paper currency. 7. Transiwrtatipn and qommunication facilities to be owned and operated by the people. The representation based on the vote for Streeter for president in 1888 entitles the convention to about 250 members, and in additition each Pariners'alliance, each assembly of the Knights of Labor, each Grange, each brotherhood or labor union, or other industrial organization, shall be entitled to one delegate. EiiglisU Want Our Tobaooo Business. Louisville, Ky., June 16. -^An English syndicate is negotiating for. the purchase of all the tobacco warehouses in this city and Cincinnati.' Ex-Con-pressman Albert S. Willis is -attorney lor the syndicate and Julius Barkhouse is its agent. These two gentlemen left a few days ago for England to jjierfect the plans. It is said !f2,,000,000 is the price asked for the godd will in this city without any real estate: With; the. Louisville and Cincinnati markets the (syndicate could control the tobacco market of the world, Louisville alone last year selling nearly 200,000 hogsheads. Cholera in Spain. Madrid, June 16.-The first of the cases of cholera at Puebla -dp Rugal manifested themselves a month ago, after extensive excavations had been made for the purpose of paving[ the streets, . Nine deaths from the. disease have occuiTed and on Saturday there were seven fresh cases. Two-thirds of the inhabitants of the town have fled. Seven deaths and seven fresh cases are reported at Montichelvo, a village near Peubla de Regal. ^ Will Beplevin the Dynamos. Albany, N. Y., June 16.-The next legal step that will be taken in behalf of the Westinghouse Electric company to prevent the use of their vibrancy current dynamos forthe execution of mur-. derers injthis state wiU be' in the form of a writ of replevin to recover ; possession of the three dynamos of their patent; now in the i state v: prisons at ^ Auburn;] Dannemora and Sing. Sing, which Har-: old P.: Brown; the electrical'expert, pur" chased for the state. A Lunatic Sulelde* at Iilnooln. Lincoln, Neb., June 16. - Richard Hansen,- an inmate; of,the ;� insane Asylum, committed suicide at an' early. hour Sunday morning. He was confined; in a safety room;but.succeeded in tearing away the heavy wire screen' which protects the windows, and breaking. them. With a piece of glass he inflicted' frightful gashes on his throat, causing almost' instant death; Hansen had been an inmate of the asylum but a few-days,   ' ; Indians Bob and Threaten. Spokane Falls,'Wash,, June 16.-Jif 0;"L^nard;);ju8tlarrived from: Okandar^ ^gln'countyfbringBnVws that the store of r "Paw" Oummings was robbed of large amonnt of:mercbandis�ai}d ISO. in cash ^Thnraday: last 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication