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LeMars Sentinel: Friday, April 25, 1890 - Page 1

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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - April 25, 1890, Lemars, Iowa                                VOL. XX, NO. 33, LE MARS, IOWA, FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 1890.   ISSUED SEMI-WEEKLY. .00 PER YEAR EXIT WINTER. Arri! u Dull times don't matter, always some clothes to be sold.   If our goods are more desirable than others you i|  should buy them. We have been sell-'\\      clothing for twenty-two years and feel rather familiar with the business. ir sales in LeMars for the past nine years have been very satisfactory, but this year we have bought more GOOD GOODS than ever before. We are bound to win more trade to do a larger busi- ness. Merit in fflerchandise Pays is our motto-we live up to it. We can't buy clothes too good or sell them too cheap. You will find our stock very complete this season in CLOTHING, Hats, Gloves, Shoes, NECKWEAR, UNDERWEAR, lie Ml Fi! M '-AND- FnBch Flannel Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Trunks, Valises &C. You've heard of us, now come and see us, and we will do you good -AT- IDO W^'iS ONE PRICE S, Clothing House, READY FOR RiJ The Oklahoma Bill Now Await ing Approval. WINU-SWEPT HALLS OP THE HOUSE Give Mack the Beverberatloiis of FoIlMcuI Oiutois Whu "Get Xlieie" .Just a tlttl Blfforont-Houso URpiibllciiiis KiiiIdi'so the Morrill Service I'ciialoii Itlll. 1%   _ , Washington, April 24.-The house occupied tlie day in discu3sing the legis lative. tixeculive and judicial appropriation bill, the pending question being on the motion to strike out the clause providing clerks for senalors. A long dis cussion ensued as to the relative rights and privilef^es of the two houses of con gross, witliouc much r ferencie to the pending bill. Mr. But(ei-worth said that nine out of every tea reprejenta-tives favored clerks for members of both houses, but were afrail to vote for it wlien the yea and imy vote was called, Mr. Butterworth said if he had a clerk he would bo woith .?10,000 year more to his constituents . Mr. Breckinridge of Kentucky said that under the present rules the sen ite was usurping the power of the house, and in spite of its continuing character was becoming the leader of public opinion. The senate discussed public matlers in public before the nation, and so long as It continued to do this and the house continued to conduct its business without proper debate the son-ate would become the true representative of the people. The house, he said, was abdicating its power day by day. After further discussion the motion to strike out was losv-85 to 'J7. Mr Kelley of Kansas started a genera debate as to persecution of Republican postmasters, and outrages in ihe soutb. Speaking to a verbal amendment. Mr. Kelly replied to a remark make by Mr. Allen of Mississippi to the effect that some of tlie newly appointed postmasters in Mississippi, had moved their offices out of the town into the country. Thinking Sliat there must be some re i-son for this, he iiad gone to ihe postof-fice department, and had been informed that in some places it was impossible for a Republican postrnaster to secure a location in a town and he was obliged to gi to the country. As an instan e o� the manner in which some Republican postraa t rs were treated in tlie s juth, lie read a letter from W. A. Finley, appointed in May as iiostmnster at Abbeville, S. C, who states that shortly after his appoint i.ent he was set upon by a mob led by Ward S. Cothran. son of Congressman Cotbra'i, and beaten with barbed wire and ordered to leave the town. Mr. Kelley said while he did not agree with the gentleman from Mississippi, Mr. Allen, in his critici-sm of the president, he did not complain that thg president played with his little grandchild, but he wished he wouid cease it long enough to see to it that everj; man in i,ha United States, black or white, is under the protection of the flag. Mr. Allen of Mississippi said there had never been a time in the history of the g. o. p. when southern outrages werp more necessary for the purposes of that party than they were to-day. It had gone to the wall on the tariff; it hid bureted higher than a kite on civil service; the elections wore going against it, and if it cuuldnotcarry the election on southern outrages, the chances of the g. o. p. wee gone. jMr. Cothran oi South Carolina, said that there was just enough of fact in the rtaming letter which had been read by the gentleman from K msas relative to the Abbeville case to make out a story. Tnere was a town; tlie e was a post-office; there was an applicant for the pos mastership, and there were some hot-headed young ii^en, of which his son was one. Alter the war a northern man had bee-' appointed postmtjster, nd had served until Arthur's term, when he died, and his wife, a most estimable and able woman, had been appointed, r'lnley had filed an application with the first; assistant postmaster general, in which he had inisreprese'tod and defamed the char icter of the postmistress. There was a feelin;of outrage against him. Tliese young men, not for the purpose ot doing Finley any harm, went to ills home one night and ma le some demonstrations. Wuh a JJguilty conscience he h id broken out at the back door and run down to the railroad track. In jumning i own a cut he had broken his leg.' Mr. Rogers of ArVansas called attention to the fct that under leave to print tlie gentleman from Kansas had printed in The Record vile calumnies on the state of Kansas, and asked: "Had the gentleman no shame or decency, no idea of' i ropriety, no character to lose, and none to mnKO? Was he lost- irretrievably 4ost? What sort of a con-tituency had be? Did- they know him? The speech huhad printeiin The Record would be a perpetual memorial to the character ot the man Kansas sent to the national legislature, and would accentuate the great loss Kansas experienced when the adninistr -i- of the silver bullion in Che treasury;' provided that the secretary may, in his discretion, exchange for such silver bullion notes an amount of silver which shall bo equal in value at market price on the day ot the exchange of the notes. Ihe bill allows the secretary to purchase both foreign and domestic bullion. It also repeals provisions of the prcent law which requires the coinage of not less than 3.-(100,000 each month. Miiilstera Are AmbassadorH. Wasiiinoton, April 2li.-Senator Sherman, from the committee on foreign relations, reported an amendment to tlie diplomatic appropriation bill, giving the title of ambassador to our ministers to G eat Britain, France, Germany and Russia, the salary to be as now, 17,500 per annum. Other amendments proposed by the committee to the bill provide that the salary of the United States minister to Turkey shall be $10,1)00, an increase of .?3,500; to Denmark 7,500, an increase of S3;500, and to Greece, Roumania and Servia,$7,500, an increase of 1,000. Secretary Blaine, in a letter to the committe^ recommends the increase in the salary of the minister to Turkey. The amendment with regard to the Diinish mission is accompanied by a letter from Mr. Rasmus B. Anderson, at the time the out-going Democratic minister, strongly urging the necessity of an increased salary for the minister at Copenhagen, in ordi'r that > e might live comfortably and well. Several letters from Mr. Clark C rr, the present minister, complaining of the inadequate salary, also accompany the report. An Interstate Conimerco Decision. Washi.vgton, April ' iS.-The interstate commerce commission decided the complaint of the Worcester Excursion Car company against the Pennsylvania railroad company. Opinion by Commissioner Bragg The main question involved in this proceeding was,i where a raUroad company has furnished to the public by an agreement with one car company,' a suffioient supply , of. sleeping and excursion cars for all the business on its lines, whether it can be compelled {(gainst its objection to haul in its passenger trains excursion cars belonging to other private car companies. The commissio decid.d it could not. Rise LAND B LlL, A Flood of Petitions, Suggestions and Protests LAUNCHED   UPON  PAKLIAMKNT, SPRING BROS Hardware Stanley Uanqncted by Our Minister at Belgium - A Sensation Caused 1�y a Thiers Worlt in tlio Russian War Office - Alonte Carlo 'Winnings. London, April 2.i.-The introduction of the government's Irish land purchase bill has launched upon parliament and the ministry a flood of petitions, suggestions, protests and the like from the exponents of every conceivable shade of political opinion. The Presbyterian ministers of the north of Ireland have united in a memorial, which was delivered to the house, praying that the provisions of the bill as affecting both landlord and tenant be made com pul-Bory. The petition beai-s the signatures of'1,000 members of the dissenting clergy, and earnestly indorses the government's scheme. The convention of landlord  is holding daily meetings at the London house of the Duke of Aber-corn, the sittings being devoted to discussing the bill and suggesting changes therein which will be to their advantage and which no doubt will be accepted by Mr. Balfour if he can assure himself that they stand a reasonable chance of adoption by the house. Tlie May Day Movement. London, April 25.-Mr. John Burnett, one of the English delegates to the Berlin labor conference, has written to M. De Tahe^ in Paris that the May day movement is active both in England and America. A joint meeting of the various trade unions, held at Cork, approved a telegram sent by Michael Davitt, advising all the strikers, except those employed by the railways, to resume work at once. _ Stanley Uanqueted. Brussels, April 25,-Mr. E. H. Terrell, United States minister to Belgium, gave a banquet in honor of Henry M. Stanley. Among the guests were Prince Cbirhay, CountOultermont, Baron Lam-bermont, Mr. Samuel R. Thayer, American minister to The Hague; Mr. Charles Emory Smith, recently appointed United States m nister to Russia, Sir John K i k and all of the European diplomats accredited to the Belgian court. Workingmen in Polities. London, April 2').-The Nottinghamshire miners, comprising the 'constituency of Mr. John Kdward Ellis, Glitd-stonian member of parliament for Rush-clifi'e, have served notice upon that gen-man that unless he will give his unqualified support to the movement for a general working day' of eiglit hours th6y will consider that he- has forfeited their confidence. Mr. Ellis has not yet replied'to the notice. Stolen From the Rustiian War Office. St.Petersburg, April 25.-The discovery has been made that documents embodying a scheme of Russian mobilization on the frontiers of Germany and Austria in the event of war, have been stolen from the war office. The discov-has created a profound sensation in high military circles, and suspicion of complicity in the theft attaches to several persons of high rank. A Ileeoril Itrealier. London, April 25.-The highly satu-factory re'formance of the steamship. Majestic on her trip to New York has led the Liverpool experts to declare their conviction that she will break the record on her next voyage, and many bets at even money liavelieen made on the event. Heating Stoves, Latest Styles, Bottom Prices. New Styles of Furniture, Attractive Prices SPRING BROS. Undertakei'S and Embalmei's. TOWNSEND BROS., -DEALERS IN- Shingles, Lalii. Posts, Sn,�li, Doors, Moulding, ' Coal, Lime, Cement, STUCCO, HAIR. STONE BRICK, PAINTS AND BUILDING HARD"WARE. Will sell as low as the lowest, will treat you fairly and merit your future trade YARDS AL LEMARS, REMSEN, GRANVILLE AND GREELY. BEST. CI^EAPEST. Oil'eiided tlio Pope. London. April 25.-A dispatch from Rome says that Cardinal San Felice, archbishop of Naples, has grievously offended ths Pope, and has been notified of his removal from his see. He will be succeeded by Mgr. Agliardi, now papal nuncio at Munich. Morrill Service Pension Dili, ndorsed. Washington, April -^5. -The matter pensions was discussed by the house Republican caucus. They indorsed the Morrill service pen-ion bill. This bill grants a pension of $S per month to soldiers who served ninety days in the war of the rebe lion and -who Jiavo reached the age of tlO years. Woinen*fl Clubs inrConventlou. New York, April 26.,--^M s, Clyiner called the Woman's cliib'convention to order at 3 p.m. The afternoon was taken up with the i-eading of reports from the various clubs represented. Trout Klslilne. Saua nag Lake, N. Y., April 25,-The ice broke up and went out of the lower Saranac lake. This insures the opening of the trout flshifig season thrpughout the Adivondaoks on llay ). A Prominent Republioan'a Death. Rutland; Vt.jA|>ril:- &5.-:Hon. Walter (}, Dunton,  ,-Hon. Francis Sted-man, the last surviving grandson of William Ell6ry, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, died yesterday, aged SO years. He served several terms in the legislature and in the city council. Orooers Want Free Saitar. Scbanton, Pa., April 25-The State Grocers' association, now in session here, GRAPHITE. Dixon's American Graphite everlasting Axle Grease is made ol plumbago or black lead. It will out last ten times its amount of common axle grease and wagons will run much easier when it is used. Put up in tin boxes. Best lubricator for wagons, buggies or gearings. Made by the Dixon lead pencil company. Money refunded if not satisfactory. For sale at BRAY & CARPE.HTER'S Grocery, Opera House Block. lycMars, Iowa. *^DENT & MORETON-*. Over LeMars National Bank.   Do a Real Estate and Chattel Mortgage business. Negotiable Papers bought.   Pire and Toronndo Insurance in Reliable Companies. MUTUAL ALSO AGENTS FOR THE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY t      LARGEST LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY IN THE WORLD. ESTABLISHED SEFllTiTION FOfi FlIB DEAUR6. Kluckhohn k Kerberg REl> FRONT,  OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, LEMARS. -['..{'�^�yrli^:^^ Have now their stock complete of seasonable goods.   Ladies will find it to their interest to look over the mammoth stock of White Goods, Embroitleries, Dress Goods, And the LATEST TRIMMINGS.      The largest stock of Corsets and Hoseiy. Buy your Dresses of Kluckhohn & Kerberg and get a pattern free with every . suit.     Fine Shoes from $1.00 up for everybody. M. A. MOORE, -dealbb in- Luiber, Latb, SUngles, Pickets, Sasb, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, Building Paper; V,!;   , STONE. HARD AND' SOFT QOATiplttT Offices at LeMars, Kingsley and Mpyillp, ;Iq Alarge and well assorted stock of Seasoned Lumber constmifl^jO Owing to the low price of farm; produce and the cansemarslius in ness I have concluded to offer unusual. inducf meats.to t^Q^^lvidiiiii the coming season. Bring in your cash and I^wjijl rivg ypu h^dhcfxjt'-   

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