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LeMars Sentinel Newspaper Archive: February 4, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: LeMars Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - February 4, 1890, Lemars, Iowa                                (joii--        ..,11(9 VJ"'-" few TO HAL1 t jjsmes Clmroh will try to 'mnsio and more ut-tionsthanevor. liEued Bomi-Weokly. UAUSOAI.B& CllASSEI.U i-uDs. 0. H. R.R.aal.. E. l�.Ch..ull. lemak8,       �        IOWA. PEHBONAt. ..�3 00 ... 1 50 SUBSCRIPTION. Pot ysar.................................. le paid in Advance, por year...... ADVERTISING RATE8.^^^ 1 Colmnu onoc,a,w�l  loan at b per cent on approv giving borrowers privilege of ustnllments of f 100. or more .est IS due before maturity of '. B./Smith & J. H. Hoffman. 26tfB iFor Sale or Traae. n 00 quarter suctions of land 'part of South Dakota which )n easy terms or trade for city stock, 21tfB J. M.DUNN. orses, Harness and Cart. a-f horses with hiirncss and a Perry 11 be sold cheap for cash or on 'Apply to Moist Bros., LeMars, 6tf8 For Sale or Iratte., liU sell or trade for property 80 "n|){ improved land, in Bluckhawk �     oetweeu Cedar Falls and the Mormal school.   Inqmie of P0hce.t.t; OOtfs A. Saiitoui arms to Bent, Bell or Exchange neiir Bcm.sen,  nil one ^nei-ijj< ^sMurs.   Pour fnrniB near Reinsen vffMwhetj      two near LeMars for sulo or ex-wui ^"'Wen �P       land in Southeast Dnkofii :flo," Hi'hoiiiif '     I. D. Smitii, Kemsen, Iowa. that u, ^^''q �     - ^"^' i-0)\e''?}. ^Imported Borlln Weiss Beer. jJa^'jn fwmprgPiiSchwind. cast 6Mi street, jj/p{.?^'^0Setf �i�^rWarraiited free of alcohol or any J"�Oiair fiT  Of in'gVsi It is a healthy and imiii laliing W6:ste*^>5e|*||^J^!:?^ns"'new book, -A Con- in   King   Arthur's l'""nanhC|, it NDDJtv, Con; "fi-iiished, lionets .'� e:Mtted �don A. ;ee it'euting a stir in liK.Tary nir-idrt grwitly to the i'e|>uiai.ion humoriiit.   It is a keen itnd tii'e.on English nobility iinri ,; will be griatly rthahed by iciii    It iH lejilete withrieh IiiiIk r lus situations enfiticud iirnctc'i'istic drawings bv Dun ?l!he!,book is ;sold only by sub-Eiid agents lire wuiitwd by the ,-;R.:S. Pualo & Co., Cliicago, J. TJ. Sammis attorney over Spring Bros, Court -will not convene .igaiii unti February 10th. E. Laux downs them all cheap for cash.' Girl wanted to do general housewor Apply to J. M. Dunn. 6tf No.,1, hay, baled, delivered at $6.50 per ton by Ben Amos. 7tf Tlie Kingsley Times favors the tax for a normal school in Plymouth county. Corn, oats and barley wanted at LeMars Planing Mill. � Will pay highest market price. 7tf Go to E, Laux for your groceries Cheap for cash.   Hotels a specialty. 5t5 Tex money has poured into the county treasury very slowly during January. Baled hay delivered lo any part of the city in smiU lots at 40c per hundred by Plymouth Roller Mill Co.      04-f Mrs. Close died last week. Her residence was ul.out ten miles west and one mile north. Matt Kale has been adding to his business. He not only runs a first clnes restaurant but has added a stock of groceries. The LeMars Building & Loan Asso ciation has mcmey to loan.  If you wish to build a home, or borrow money on easy payments, call on .1. U. Snininis secretary. 4tr I am not cutting prices, only  selling for cash; then I can sell cheaper, 5t6 B. Laxjx. Former customers will be glad to know that Miss Blanche Buibridge has returned and re-opcncd her dressmaking shop. 8t4 Remember the great stock siile at ijlur-ges Bros.fiirm two miles northeast of Sen-ey next Wednesday, Feb. 5th. Three thorough, bred shorthorn bulls will be sold besides other stock. The United States Clothing emporium of H F. Dow hiis been rceeiviiig some invoices of new clolliii-g during the jiast week. Mr. Dow keeps up with the procession. Shoes?   Yes, have you read Duim'& Co.'s new ntlveillsemenr.   Don'tatuinble around tlirough February stoiuis cold und wet feet when shoes clicnp. What was termed a "blindfold" ])arty was held at Piof. Wernli's one evening Inst week. A liir^e number of tlie young ;jeoplo went out and enjoyed tliciiiselvcs with games and the viviicious oysK'i'. Dr. C. M. Hillebrimd'R olhc.i for the next week or two will be in C. V. Woodiirfl's office in room formerly occu-picil by the city library and later will be over A. R. Stemer's store.        8t4 Last week wasn't a had week at all If the judge hiid adjourned court one day sooner it wonid have given Attorney (Iiirper a better chance to visit with the young UMH who came to live with liiiii. Prof, Cooper hasn't bii'cn around but IS proliiililv too bnwv. Sturgcs Bros, will hold a public sale on their farm, 2 miles northeast of Seney, on Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 10:80 a. m. at which time the following property will be sold: 8 horses, 80 head of high grade short horn cattle, 40: hogs, 30 tons hay, machinery, etc. Lunch at noon.     -61.4 ICICCII,   Liuit.   ......------- was {I^^u city last week u guest of Uev. Uearhcart. Sioux\^ty Journiil; Misa Florence Argo, of LeMars, is tl ----   "       �� - ~=�.^f�. braska,        ^ I, goes tliis week to Cliestcr county, "^eniisyivnni.i witli a carload of tiorscs to sell. it is expected tliaVuev. C. W. Dennis will liave the pastoral care of tl-for another year, Louis Xjuckuy, of near A^ron, was in titc city Saturday rhorning and took tme train for iiotne by way of Sioux City. \ Buvt Ferguson started on MondSv for n ten days trip through Minnesota and NorttSa-n Iowa in the interest of thisoHirc.. \ Clias Tedrick, the popular recorded of Sioux county was in tlie city Friday niglit attending tho German at the Union. ^ Mr, Thomas Treat is so severely ill that he was unalile to go east to attend the funeral of his brother at Polo, 111,, and is still quite low. Harry Maxfield-our Marry-took titne Monday ptist church of this city on lie. ivonlil Bfl'.l   llliil with ai-u so Le }Mangt. and fat;iatehes,of every "ri human m aniinuls cured,;in 80 Wooltord�-S initnry fL(>t'9!|-, fails, sold by P. IL D.ehl, if .^'spiV/^^'^'es.VW. Wood, McGiegoi, I 104ttro 84. �ii iT^^Pite' Vi -"Tl"J{"^V.'^v ^ll ai^^--b          Dear In? worm 22 feet lo��, head troubled for a long tune ^f.^fed.br fi,TT^?'\w^miY stomach an.l ikl>i�g to Ro to Sioux City for a brief pariod of recreation from active duty in the prJntinir line. Mr. and Mrs. James McFarlantl left on Saturday for a visit with relatives and friends out in Henry lownsliip.  No doubt they had a fine time. J, M. Ainslio grabbed a travollin^r man's grip Saturday and miidc a tlyinjr trip to Cherokee on Sentinel business,  lie returned Satnrtbiy even Mr. Geo. Alnslie, u brotlicr of }. M. nnd Joe Ainslie, of the Sentinel force came in from Wcb-Bler City onSatuvdiiy evening to spend Sunday with the boys. A very select German was indulged in by the lovers of the art Terpsichore at the Union hotel on Friday eyeninjr of last week. It wns a very pleasant affair. Kev. H, J. Brown, a former pastor of the Free Baptist church occupied the pulpit lii.st Sunday morning and eveninjy much to the pleasure of his old friends. The Misses Swanzey and Oliver on Sunday re-eeived some very handsome and fresh flrtweis, the friendly reminder of Mrs. John Arcndt who feathered them from Florida. Miss Amy Bog^s, assistant principal of our hlph school, has been so 111 in Sioux City, that the prob alalitics are she will for a ivhile at le:ist, be unable tore-asssume hcrduties, Mr. Pitt Seaman went north Mrnday morning: to place some of the Sioux City & Northern mortgatres on record in the counties north, iiftcr havinjy; recorded $200,000 in this county. Mr, A. Blecker, one of the live and enterprising farmers of near Merrill, was jn the city over Sab-hath. Mr. Blecker talks some of inakin^,^ his home here altogctiicr at a later date. Father Schultc, the Catholic priest at Remscn, Wiis in the city.the truest of Father Meis during' the school exhibition and appeared to enjoy the efforts of the yoiin^ people immensely.  � Miss Susie Mclion who taught near \Vm, McCul-loch's place in Grant township, lust Bjminjer lias been laid up for two weeks with the grippe. She came up from Sioux City Saturday, Mrs. P. H. Dichl left on Saturday mornin}>: for Polo, 111., where she went to assist Mrs. A. H. Treat during- the tryinjj ordeal she had in buryingr her husband and to attend the funeral. Prof. /. Wernli, of the Northwestern Normal, addressed the members of the German M. E. church on Sunday, during- the absence of Rev. Wclmeyer, who went to Rosbach to fi\\ an appointment. Freddy Powers, while playmg: tag with the boys at the rink, on Saturday evening, skated against the side of the building. That's the rejison why his right eye is draped in such somber mourning. Rev. I, N. Pardee went to KingsKy on Saturday .ftst to take charge of the quarterly meeting at that point for Rev. Whitfield. Rev. Gnggs, of Merrill, supplied his pulpit at this place dunng his absence. H. H. Jones, of Lake county. South Dakota, was in the city on Saturday looking after relief for the sufferers of his county in Dakota, and a meeting was lo ne held Saturday eyening at the council roorn. Mrs. y.Vi, I'ox was called from church on Sunday to read a iclcgrani stalmg that hur mother, aged sevcntv-nme venrs was dangerously sick al her home n Sycamore, III. >frs. Fo.v left Sundav evening to go to her bedside. John Bunt has been here for a day or two making arrangements to take his family to Fremont, Nebraska. They all left this morning for their new home. The good wishes of their many LeMars friends will follow them. A very pleasant party occurred at tlie home of DanM Hammond on the Bettsworth farm just west of town on Saturday evening. Some cltgant re-frefhments were served and at 11 .'^o oysters vfore partaken of by about Aftccn couple ot young people. A Aev Enterprue A new deal in the city, which may be a surprise to many of our people has occurred during tho past few days. Mr. Gustave Pesb, formerly of Storm Lake, haa for a long tmie had his cye^ on Le-' Marsas a manufatturing point, and on Saturday arrived with his machinery and plant for manufacturing a large well-augur and to do a general foundry and machine shop business. Mr. Pesh has had: a large experience . in his line ot business. He left the busi-DCBs which ho has built up at Storm Lake doing buainoHS wliciii I. N. Goiii, of Jler-riU entered tho place iiiifl tisked lum if ho   wiiB   tho   man who  struck Roao witl) li bottle?   He unswerod  tlmt he WH*', wlien Goin proceeded to put a bend on liim.   Tlie bur counter was in the way, consotivu'n'ly Goin kicked in the little partition to ^'et ni his nuu), nnd the bystanders say, struck Kieffit;r over the head repeatedly with a revolver.    X couple  of frii.'fid:', ofEered  lo   ii8si,-*t Kieffer, wIumi G.iin pulled the ^un them and infonniMl tlj-ni th.n do the whole erowd."   It n Goin W09 n(�t undiM' lln* iiillju-iici,' of liquor, but his fiiend.s sjiy tliat unleKs lie were, he would never have nctnd in th-iL manner. Dr. MciViulmn attended the wounded man and sewed up the wounds on his Iiead, It is said that Kieffer will prosecute Goin. Another  account of tho nffiiir says that Goin went in nnd asked the 'jues tion over which the difficulty arose, an( that Kiefter drew  the  revolver   an( threatened to shoot him.   To avoid be ing siuit. he UJiturally got over the parri-tion, cnptured the other mun^s revolver and ^ot in his work in self defense, was possibly so'jcr enough after all, takes some nerve to fntjo three men one has a revolver, und �   3, ' a, ' 13, " 13,  lii, " 13, " 31, " 21, 21, " 25, 1' LuJfMi>, To  Mr, Thompson, Kiu^ To .Mr. ami Mrs. STii, Kiii�sli;y,------. To Mr (iiid Mi9, All doii, Kliigslov,------. To A[r. iukI Ads. Kpayrjirery maa;to^^ hi m-frjriari (MtimaJe?^ ;0n accouiit of it he 3*>,}S;vPriceripfjgr8injiind,o jetetnejiaray^te (tekhcjlwijlimalce'itfi^^ ll^pre^pooA^^^^^^ ^ipSpUlpajS^Siiifp^am ..�   �----'�^.";itiW'i':CfeStTritBBOH;!i*ifei; Council Ueeting. A meeting af tlio council was held on Monday evening. A resolution was passed ordering obstructions removed from Court, Lincoln and Fifth streets, and ordered the clerk to notify the railroad company to remove obstructions and to lay necessary sidewalks on those streets. If this can be done it will undoubtedly be a fine thing for the city and will improve the looks of those streets. The council appointed a meeting with the executive committee of the Normal School for to-night to arrange for sending a committee to DcsMoiues to use its influence for the State Normal School location and to consult about the mat- A new street lamp was ordered to be placed at the corner of Fifth and Hubbard streets, . After the council ineetinga little feast was provided for them by Joseph Long: which was indulged in at Heeb'a restaurant. Tkbat-At Wabash, Indiana, January 31st, 1800, A.' H. Treat, aged about sixty-one years, Tho cause of death was an attack of la grippe in addition to his other ill health. The funeral occurred on Sunday, February 2d, lit Polo, Illinois, the former iiome of Mr. Treat, Mr. Treat's death while It IS a surprise to many at the same time is a serious blow to the city, on account of the many positions which he has o^cupi'.'d which arc left vacant. Our means of knowing all of the circumstances of iiis death, at this writing are limited, but wc know that tho sorrowing at his loss 18 sincere and real at this point. Mr. Treat was an exceptionally fine H man of means and a shrewd He was identified with several Bargains in Overcoats and linier Clotting To make room for our spring stock. DUNN & CO. 1 WOODWARD BLOCK. 39, citizen, pubU^eatcVprises.  He was president of in good running shape with twenty-two men employed and running over time to flu contracts. He goes into the building owned by M, A. Moore and which has been lised-by the Gateway Manufacturing Conipany. : We trust that he will build up a fine business . ..-r-.-'ij-rr;-  ^ 'noticed I. making.^some^'hasty steps .8lpiig:'vM8tni;/stree,tif!B:;Be'Sw^^ dray. The reporteDimaginedthat he had laid out foyr or five prisoners and need-c^i'(the dray to';brj,ng-theni up to the jUifelfeir^ibnt'Such^ wasi 1^ Ma^mplyAullingiiinfofleiisive^ 37,makingatotM of 77-, M.ckley Yates 35, making \total of 74. In the two shoo\th� totals riin follows:   Mayher85>ickley82, ^ ates 80 and Sampson 78. These are the figures o\one birds each, for the two shoXts. hundred General meetmg''at\uJ.M>^>>�';'� office, Friday evening, 7:30, Fey. 7tl '90.  Important business. \ Wm-A. CoTTKBLii, Secys^ JOB PMTINe, Book Biridi Blank R More FlaaSer. ' This morning early some sneak thieves broke a side light by the door at Becky; Sharps arid got inside.   They took about 1,800 or 1,300 cigars and drank sonie bottles of pop. .Fortunately:the money drawer had been emptied the night before and the thieves gob; no money:-/':'. : The first ward and; also the. old school: building WHS broken into Inst night' audi: teachers' desks broken andpencils stolen. .  Oood Tims Promised. A prominent fentuie of the St. James til, will be a fine supper served by two dies of-the congii-gutirin, from G t4i 8 the Plymouth Roller Mill Company and the Gateway Manufacturing Company. Ho was vice-president and director of the First National Bank and vice-president and director of the Western Investment Association. Ho was also director m the Union Hotel Company. He was a director' and primt mover in tho Choral Union and the young people thought very much of him. It is said by one of our citizens that no one could cheer up and animate the meetings as he could. Music was his delight and htssoul went out to the young people of the.Choral,Union in sympathy and with hslpful-force. A regret is expressed th^lt/they could notas a body have the ftrivilege of laying the remains of such s /respected member away in its^ast abode, ; Mr., l^reat was identified ut this place with the'Presbytcrinn church as trustee. On last Sunday morning lier. Fahs of the Presbyterian church, before be^n-ning his; sermon,: referred in a brief and feelingiuanner. to.tiio death oif.iMr. A:H. Treat. , .... , .He spoke of: his connection: with that churijh as a trustee and his qaefulness in ,tbatVcap4city-,-...of,:Jiis; most coastaht'and Ul.tlvl!. ,10 1-^ th"e cells pf tM�y (pprbminent->yit:. ToolT.i,gii;^|S|f_,^ jBe maBpfaotor^, MliJ^J Vi'/V?,''!;' X'ttiing Jllahop?       I- -, ^' Fair Indies o'clock Mondiv\   evening, ^      . AmongotheilhiLjiswill be "Jf^^J 'Jpi?^?, diffieieot   stjKH, birad,   cakes,^V/\^IV� meats, salad'!, Fi nits, r,re tms, e' dttntinstrumunlal musio will' dunng the' i-upper an' program n ill be rend pel. 1' ���.,::,.v,Slit'-^-,. ___ The,!?^'   By Firstclass Workmen Also Fine Engraving asiowiU''   . �#elry Iter broke mares ia>fok't7t rst Promium Iowa State witlivrMerve'some of our . RE m tnmm smute A^^"-T --^r^'scellaneous FARM MAOHn^EinV'- V. Ji^ou ,^mtu^.<^.^^^,^ ,hape of a horse, don't main street, lemars, i^W'A. OF POST OFFICE. f the (tryisS^fe Thp atop fail to atleoa as they must ^, cowajm;br6s. I ceiit. interest. <     ' ' 7T,f l�.m. Free Lunch kt^noon. - 'Vt'       " , Mets, iih ^ gs. Bu.rd4Wpev;;' f AND"'9'      --'^^�^^^ s   

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