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LeMars Sentinel Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1876 - Page 1

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Publication: LeMars Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - May 18, 1876, Lemars, Iowa                                fllo^Wy 0 mMi^ba, '       -         - ' ,  1 00 VOLUME VI. LEMARS, PLYMOUTH COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, MAY 18, 1876, m. 11. ir��dqiurterfr.for Farmlaff lmp1�iiiontii of all kladfl (' .BalBM' niiBdii - Betder, 'I jM       '    ''''3%' ' ^�'^   ��"f �"' ''"'^ UaU 9f ASVIBfZgXMOr 	1 w	1 in	V".		 1' nqak.	1 00	3 Ol��	000	r �o	UM 2 I^Mt.	1 76	6 OU		lu w	� 0� Mcol	�to	13 to	i�to	10 00	U 00 �- R e�l	TOO	IS 00	25 00	� 00	41 NO 	8 00	20 00	17 00	MOO	MOO 	10 uo	U 00	4SM	80 00	100 00 Oonlift eolOMiD ilTeHlMmnti:lw*ai*-fl*a rrt cMt.iidilltluii*!. ^> ' liaml NotlcMnennfuMfflMforllltf rtMrtfe*. and 10 mnia  line for -eh nliM4�eBt Iswrlloa. SpeolKl notico hitTing nrMtdeMt'Of oMIaMjr ada TWtlaing, 6U pur oout In adTance ofthdM rafu.' All Irmuiient hdvertliiax ninit M pkfd In �IraBt* AdTurllnpinantii onlcrad out h�ror* mpMattoa �f ftaM atTMd SB oth^iMd at iNDMfeM. , , an orir- v�r]^:;-jfimple 'luA -caj^ble ikwmrlM-ottofifkti, ujiior Ilia gjnin msy^Med, liiin of mindlr;:'elianfif�/ andriean  W       ? '} � i ifJniTElllllrEK THAN EVER. � * �� "    �         - A fnll supply of !oDe and two wheeled REAPERS. The Little Chieftain, Leader Combined Reajier and Mower, Oorham'and Prairie nity 8E EIDERS, Cii^vators of all Kinds ^Njjding or'^^Walking,   . I>oubld"and (Ingle A full line of (^rand de Tour and I'rnirleGlty BSEAma^Avi) STiaBma plows. Nebraska Breakers, Gang Flows, FAzmma kills, . On long rinie. Scotch Harrows, -Steel^Pointed Hollow Tooth Harrows V   That cnt: eloTen foet; Srowzi's Oom Flaxiter s HEAVY AND WGHT \^ AGONS, 'iTHBKSHKRS, TCto. Parltea wlaliiiig miichlner)' of nny dencrlpllon, will And 11 to their ndiftiilnge t j cnll HUil exuniino bla >l�ck and itrlc'ealiero're buying. WNY ISTNE COAtlCOOKING STOVE To BUY? It is the Qiiiclcest Baker, IIV I {Convenient Bini, Btjry ind i^!(^i^'iiiU^iry one. B* iBN and ��k TOST deder.for the JMIIIJOR. WM. Rl �MirMTMl ua ��k yoBT dealer for the MHlim ,^ . ^ WP��MOMlllftl||ii!l|,?.'/,r- 8n8Bl0conm2thaueaw t        UWHri;l�W|L _y-t. jwF      ^< -  "St   1*      1 ' CA Reoe^yfl^; JDieppsits, Buys    Sells Exchange, ; FOREIGN AND.tf()3ai8T^(�'"'r '<  " Loans Money on apprpyedSeouri%.&o,,lJJPrf"* ^i"* rit^CMI�'tH�^J'oT*liyoti:''siolis;" " . 1 ^jH.'J'feBrl�ir**I^^,ioritli;''-'-:0'i SXScSOIic ajpi A^'D'^f^FROM ^iL KUROPBAN POJITS.. LEMABS; IOWA. J (Late of lirit^6}er. Dent ^OoT, Otlilia. lU. Sueceta�ttoWm.Xi/mera,rrivaeJ}anker.] os PBOVBD Security LOANI roilcetloii�FroinptIr Attni4ec in trade and Viss of capitali TIrej' wltl naturally reduce expenses as milch �� they Can so as to save themselves. On the Other hand, they cannot rfettifce the piles ot luqor Ijelow n figure wliich will command the amount and kind ot l�bor they require. The fact is that there is an abundance of It offered at the prices which thoy propose to pay; but the strikers nssnine to prevent by force others from working at the price which tbcj themselves njcct. --^---,��        - XBE VRESXBEKmL OAinTASS. Now that the Presidential campaign of 1870 is fairly commenced, and as the time draws near when the standard-bearers of both great political p'artics will be selected, it becomes interesting to watch the progress of events, and to ascertain, *r far as practicable, the preferences of the delegates to the the Republican National Convention, thiit the relative strength of the several distinguished candidates may be determined with �omc degree ot accuracy prior to the assembling'of that body. Thus far, Mr. Blaine seems to lead, and his friends are greatly encouraged The result of a (�reful canvass ot the delegations already elected, as carofnlly prepared by a gentleman familiar with the facts; and who is, of course, friendly, to Mr. Blaine, sums up about ns follows.,given in the order, as nearly as may bo, of the conventions reporting:       . Maine, 14 delcgatps for James G. Blaine. Wiscoiison, 30 delegates elected by the State Convention, which unanimously adopted a resolution favoring Mr. Blaine's nomination; these arc passed to Mr. Blaine's nrcdit. Tejitt.% 10 delegates; un-pledgo'l, but presumed to be 6 for Blaine and 10 tor Morton. Indiana, 80 delegates for Morton. Pahnsylvania, 58'delegates Hortraft; instructed to vote as a unit whether f >ritS:Choice or subsequently for some other canaidute. Ohio, 43 delegates (or iiiiyes: Now York, 70 delegates; Mr. Conkling's friends claim oil of them, but it is claimed, on the'other hand, that 8 are lor Uluine, 3 for Bristow, and Sun-known, leaving 55 for Conkling. "Yer-moot, 10 delegates for Ulainc, but unin-strncled   Mississippi, 16; 14 for Morton, 3 unknown. North Carolina, 3 unknown. South Carolina, 14; 9 for Morton, 4 for HInine, and 1 for Bristow. District of Columbia, 3 for Blaine.   North Carolina 4 delegates-at-large selected by the State Committee; all for Blaine. Arkansas, 13 Morton, Connecticut, 13; 8 lor Jewell, 3 lor Bristow. "Virgirtia, 23 fof Blaine. Californio, 13; 10 for Blaine, and 3 for Bristow. Oregon, 0 for Blaine. Coloro-do, 0; 3 for Blaine, 3 for Bristow, 1 for Oonkling, and 1 for Morton. Idaho, 3 fur Bl line. Wyoming, 3 for Bristow. Montano, 3 for Blaine- Georgia, 4 delegates-at-large, elected by the State C�n vention, whose preferences arc not known; in the Second District 3 delegates lor Blaine. Maryland, e6 delegates for Blaine Massachusetts, 4 delegates-at-largc; 3 for Blaine and 3 fur Bristow; Second District, SforBlttine, 1 for Br.stowj FoOrth Dis trict, 3 for Blaine; Sixth, 3 for Blaine, 1 foj Bristow. cxamimtiofir of tl^liat is about to be exhibited will fMrt only inspire you with a {irofound respect for the skill and taste of our friends from other nations, but also satisfy you with the attainments ttJade by our otrif people daring the past ff 10 hundred years; linToko yoiirgen eroue co-operation with the worthy commissioners to secure a brilliant sue cess to this international exhibitioii,and to make the etay oi'utir fOTeign visitun, to whom we eitcnd a hearty welcome, both profitable and pleasant to them. I declare the international exhibition now open. Binloitan at a Wheat-Chrowing Oonntty. Ktw York Cor. Philadelphia Ledger, The announcement in cable dispatches that Hindostan is sending large quantities of wheat to the English market, which finds a ready sale at prices lower than than the lower grades of Ainerlcan �and English can be sold, creating some little stir'among the trade here. At the Produce Exchang^ the matter was much discussed, and it was agreed on all hands that if Hindoo economical labor and cheap transportation via Suez Canal, aie thuit coming in competition with us, > it may be ere long a ecrlous business for ottr farmers, unless they find.wavs and means to cheapen production. How that is to be done no one ventures to say, but done it must be, if we are to retain England as our princi . pal customer. ,. Some dealers were inclined to pooh-pooh the matter intimating that the story had been gotten up simply to '"bear" the market here; but, on reference to printed circulars and market reports of" previous date by moil, it was found that there was no doubt whatever that wheat fiom Calcutta has been placed in the Liverpool market, and that it was meeting with a Teady sale. _.-�-..>��� -'� nrSTJSTSIAL ITEKS. OEKZEmTIAL ABDSESS'- Selivered by Fz'esident Grant. The following address was deliverd by President Grant at the opening of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia May 10,1876: My Countrymen : It has been thought appropriate upon this Centennial occasion to bring together in Philadelphia 'for popular inspection specimens of our attainments in the industrial and fine arts, and in literature, science and philosophy, as well as in the great business of agriculture and of commerce, that we may the more thoroughly appreciate the excellencies and deficiencies of our achievements, and also give emphatic expression to our earnest desire to oulti vatc the frletidships of our fellow-members of this great fainily of natiorts. The enlightened agricultural, commercial, and manufacturing people of the world have been invited to send hither corres-)onding spccimenis of their skill to ex-libit on equal terms in friendly competition with out own. To this invitation they have generously responed, and for so doing we tender tbem our hearty thanks. 'The beauty add otility of the contributions will this day be submitted to your inspection by the managers of this exhibition. We are glad to know that a view of the specimens of the skill of all nations will afford to you unalloyed pleasure as well as yield to you available and practical knowledge of so many of the remarkable results of the wonderful skill existing in enlightened communities. One hundred years ago our. country was new and but partially, settled. Oar necessities have comp'dled os to chiefly expend our means and time in felling forest.s, subduing prjtiries, building dwellings, factories, shipSj-doeks,warehouses, roaUa, canals, machinery, etc., and most of our schools, churobes,- libraries, and asylums have be�ia established within a hundred ycar�. Burtjiejofid-by these great primal works of neiSPsity which could not be delayed,we yet have doae what this exhibitiau will j^ow in the direction,or rivaling older and more advance^d nations in law,-medicine aqd theok>gyr and-in 8�i|noe, literature,,phi-losophy and> the fine arts'. Whilst proud of what we have done'Wo regret that we have not done more. Qur achievcuuents iave beew great enough, however, to' make it easy ;for'.oui; pSi^ to aekBoWi*': edge superior merit wherijver fouBdj and* now, feilow-oltizcns, I h�ne ft Ottri^filt A paper mill is to be erected at Beatrice, Neb. A flax mill is to be established at Rivcrton, Nebraska. A firm in Keokuk. lovra, recently shipoed 400,000 pounds of lurd to Now York. The Helena, Ala., rolling mills are turning out excollent cotton ties in large quantities. The Solomon City, Kan., suit works are to start up soon, with a capacity of a carload of salt per day. Indications of the eisistonce of noh veiuH of iron ore have boCn disctfvcred in the hills near Muscatine, Iowa. The Cfoton Glass AVorks, New Castle, Pa., will resume operations in the course of a ielt days, under favorable auspices. A valuable graphite deposit has been discovered at Witehall, N. Y., and a large force of men have been set to work minihg it. A large merchant flouring mill has been recently completed nt Maxeppa, Wabashaw County, Minn., having a daily capacitj' of 150 barrels. A large cotton-seed oil mill i� to be started at Little Rock, Ark., if the necessary amount cf funds is subscribed to insure its location thera, l^he -TituSVillc Ileratd says tfie production of petroleum this year will probubly full short 3,500,000 barrels of the actual demand of the trade. The taKe of buffalo robes in Montatfa the present season is the heaviiest for several yealrs. Woffle of the dealers will ship from 8,000 to 10,000. The Eureka Iron Company of Wyan; dottc, Mich,, has just sold 2,000 tons of Nob 1 and 2 Bessemer pig to Messrs. Rhodes & Co., of Cleveland. There are five glass factories within the limits of St. Louis, Mb. if'iiir'o of these make flint glass, two make green and colored glass, and the fifth windan; glass. The corn crop of Kansas last year was S1,000,C00 bushels, against 4G,000, 000 the year before. The wheat crop was 16,000,000 bu8hels,6,000,000 more than in 1874. ' The Cautort, Ohio, 'Wrought Iron Bridge Company are building two bridges, one 500 feet long for Goluin-bus, Ohio, and the other 450 feet loiig, for Ottawa, Canada. ,     ' The new foundry of Dyer, Lamb & do-i South Chicago, put in its fir^t "heat" on Saturday last, and is now in full operation, with work enough awa>t^ ibg to keep it running to its utmlost ea-pncity.  The Cheboygan Tribune says that a late employee of Kingsford, the celebrated starch, manufacturer, is luaning arrangements to start a starch factory in Cheboygan, Mieh. The starch ii� to be made from potatoes. tA company colled the Bormg and Drilling Machine Coinpany of Chidogq, with a capital stock' of :i00,000 .waJi orgatiisedip that on tile 2(kh �f April, for the purpose of manufactured Ren k Rennde's combined boring and drilling machine.    ' A. stone passed through Indianapolis, friim the Oreensburg quarries to the Centennial, which was 20 feet 8 Inches long, 10 feet 4'inches wide, and 6 feet thick, contfiining 'il3f; superficisi feet. This is undoubtedly the largest flagstone ever shipped in the State.-Port Wayiie Gaxette.    ' Domestic cottoii goodn are o|i(�a|MiPjiw allithe leading luiirketB ofthe UnU|| States than at (iiiyl former       ' country/ %iid Tiiriiii&V il Russian rmercb Born.trd, Fuller & Co., are about to erect a new woolen factory: at Faribault, Minn , 27x40 feet and two stotiea high. Neif machinery of the latest Jniprotff' ments will be introduced aifc( ihe (oiK propelled by steam power. ^t the Cleveland in "So. 1 ataSi ihof have reached the vein, and find It thirty inches wide, WeU filled with frati^'e s)!-' vcr. They �o1*': iiav;e six tons of the vein in barrels in their, warehouse at the mouth of the rJter. ready to ship t� the north shore as soon as the laket 'opcn8,for the purpose of it tested in the ' Silver, Island : mill, Prince: Aithur'ft Landing.-rAshland (Wis.) Prtu. UXiSS BUSINBSS SIBEOTtiftT, Attornsyi at Law. J. n. nRUBLB. ,Ij 8. BTRUBUi. AttorneyiB at Law. Iioan and ' OolleollDn and -Cunvryanoon, Ii
                            

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