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LeMars Sentinel Newspaper Archive: April 27, 1876 - Page 1

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Publication: LeMars Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - April 27, 1876, Lemars, Iowa                                BY �OHANAJIvpdiior teet-PnTsUshsr. Oiifl r.iv^, one >w (iti^Jiinco) 3necop7 3 ihnfilln.    , $a no lOO' 60 h*        of ST�t7 fieitiJpttsi riompfly joj SMOy VOLUME VI. LEMARS, PLYMOUTH COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 1876. ISTO. 14, SATBSI 			-im		 	3 eqlW�. M col 12 col 1 col	1 00 1 76 e 8'� 7 �u  00 10 uo	3 0>> 13 M It w	BID)  to sroe 4t W	IV *w S� t�nt;n\ltlUlttnKl. . Lotm NutiMn 16��&( fMir liM Mr �nil,lM*ril*a, kou lU      �jlliM f�r�Mli ntwcvnitiaMrtlw. . ttpeclul nulla*! ImrlUK nracwlMct.urordlnfjr vcrllatiig, to per      In >av�DGe of thtM ntM. All truualtDt udvartliliiK mutt hi pkld in il^ar* AJvii] liai'iiiiiutii oril�r�a uiit bctun �a^stWa 1o repi'i T�ry almpio kad'cnpabla lilo t^qtloii, bMkwitrda jjirj furwiird, up or ^Ktli  r^ m I'uir.), Kmp-iror of all tlia B'::r.'.;!8 has iirrivud in New York, and ha=i uheiuly .shofk^d the Govemuj tnt i!ili'.!iMls, among lliem the Sicrutnries of State, War and tlie M-.ivy,liy giving Ujcmlliu siuib direct. The three Swretarius sailed dnsvn ITew York I5-.iy, each cliatguil and   piiiiied  with ii api.'ocli to iiro olfat him.    Tlii-i is tliu iir^t impiil.^e of the Jivurage Aiiieiioiin citizen. There are l>'i;ilvi:il  olii.'ial.-i lilti! ftL't'i-eturv Fish, who 111 ike  fl )wi'i'y and ilignilied speeclie.?, and threv arc Mayors like Colviu, 'wlioinake Ijoors and clowns ot tUcaiselveK npoii siieli occKions; but all, from CabuRt oHU'ial.s 111 Co'iUL'ilmun, leel it incumbent upon themselvc-.s as rej r sent lives of the g.vat ...linencan jieople to "shoot off' a spi;eoh i'.t every   foreign  p-,itentate who visits iniv ihore."!.   Some potentates enjiy it. some do fiot) and iiinoiig the latter is Dom PediT.   A(.-c vas made to get at him by the Common Council,  which sent him .'i coHiiiiuDicutioJ) aigiioi by halfh dozen  Irish barkeeperi pioffjring him their nUenlion;*.   To this iiuperliiieiit and insulting piece of business, His Majesty paid no atteutimi what-evMi-.   During his stay in New Yoik tlius hir,  he has sedulously but cOnrteoufly avoided the public authoiities,. and  has ieduloubly but courteously  avoided  the public authorities, and iias gone about enjoying liimsilf ill liis own quiet way on on the elreel, behind the scenes at the theatres, in  the newspipjr  ofllous,  at Moody's religious meeting.-j, and wherever sights are tu bj seen aUiactii'e to Brazil-liiin eyes. It is probably mortifying for a Seoretii ry ol State to bo choked off iu the midst of liis ell nueiicc.   There iiu ivniote pi^ssi-bility that a New York /lldermaii may be j capable ul' lunriiticulion w.eu u European declines his impertinent pioffjrs of recep liou.    Tile ciicumslances of the case, however, warrant Dom Pedro iu th� course hehastuken.v Heciitic to this country not us au Emperor to be courted ami feted, dined and �iued, and talked to death, but as pluii) Uuiii /'oUi'u, to have a good tima iuhi-Suwii quiet way, and B.iy  lor .his good time out of hisovsn imperi.il p.icket-buok.   lie cveu took, the trouble to an iiouncu beforeliiinU that sucli was his in teiitiim, evidently with the hipe that this \ woulii B.yuro liim iiamuni.y from No'clns.sof men have boon ridiculed 80 inuch, and none liave done so muoh goodj as those who are denominated fancy farmers. Thoy have been in all times and countries, the beuefitctor.i of the men who have treated tlicra with derision. They have been to farmers wliat invRntors have fccen to manufacturers. They have c.NperiinciUed for the good of the world, while others have simply worked for their own good. They tested theories wliilc other.s have raised erop.s for inavkel. Tliey have given a dignity and glory to the oecupatio-i of farming it never had before. i'aiiey fiiniiers have changed tlie wild boar into tlie Sutl'olk. and Berkshire; llio wild bull of Britain into the Short-liorn; the luoiiiitaiii .sheep, with its lean body and hair fleece,into the SoulUdoWii and iMcrino. 'J'lioy bruujjiit up the mill; of cows from pints to ,!a;alloiis.   They havu lcii,i;tiieiifid tlie sid.jin ofplio bullock, deepened tboiidder of tlio cow, enlarged   the ham   of the hog,   given .strength to the shoulder of tlie ox, rendered finer the wool oCtlie ,shoep, added floetno.ss to the speed of tlio liorsc, and made beautiful cVary animal that is kept in the service of man.   They have improved and hastened the development of doinostic animal.s, til) they liardly resemble   the  creatures from' wliicii  they .sprang. Fancy farmers iiitroduecd irrigation and tuiderdruiniiig, grinding and cooking food for ."ftock. They brought guano from Kenvand nitvale of soda ii-om Chili They introduced and dotucstioated ail the plaiit.s wo have of foreign origin. 'I'hey brought out the,theory of rotation of erop.s as a natural means of keeping and increasing the fertility of tlie soil. Tliey first ground up gyjwum find bone.s; and tioaicd the hitter with acid to make manures of a peculiar value, '.flioy first analyzed soils as u lucans of deterininiiig what we wanted to ineroii.se their fertility. They introduced the the most a)) ju'oved methods of raising and distributing w;;tcr. Fancy farmers or fancy horticulturists have gi>'en u3 nil our varieties of fruii-s, vegetables iuiu flowers. A faucj^ fanner in Vermont u few years ag.c originated the J'larly liosc potato, which added iiiillioh.s of dollars to the wealth-of our country, and proved to be a most important accession in every part of the world where it was introduced. Another of those same fancy man originiitud the Wilson strawberry and another the Concord grape. It was a fancy fanner who brought tlip Oaagc orango from Texas to the Northern States. Among the men in this country who wore classed aA iiiney furiners at an early day, were ^Vasliington, Joircrsoii,l''i;ink-lin and Livingston. The first introduced mules; the second, the cultivation of improved rice ; the third, llieu.sc of land jjlaster, and the fourth, the raising of luccrno. More than any men of their lime did they add to the wealth of tlio country. Aftor tlicm came uiiotlier race of fancy farmer,", who introduced Arabian hbrsosi Spunisli..gheep, and the improved breeds of Knglish cattle and Bwinc. Those faaoy fanners added immensely to. the wealth of the practical faaniers of the couutny. What we want to develop the agriculture and horticulture of the tountry to their fullest extent is, a large number of fancy farmers, men who work for pleasure rather than for private gain. The.se arc the uicii wlio will, porforiu experiments aud'givc the world the be.ne&t of them. These are the men who wiH carry on investigations fur the sake of investigating. ''These are the men who iviir hriiig in neiv grains, now fruit.s, new vegetables, iiiid new varieties of animals. These are the meu who will devuto.thoii;. time and: mouey to the im-provment of old varieties and the crea-...... 'im... o.,.ii, Chicnno Tribune. Three gentlemen happened to m'ett at breakfa.st at the Grand Pacific Ilotel one morning last week; They were strangers to each other- Suddenly one broke the silence with the remark  "By Jove! Sho'.s divorced again." Noticing that his words had attracted the at-tentian of liis companions, he apolo,gi!iod and explained that he had been somewhat surprised to see the divorce of his quondam wife chronicled in the legal intelligence. "She and I parted," he said, in a dreamy, retrospective nuinnur, "in Augu.st, 1872-this wife with a pot-lid determined me to destroy iny Lares and Penates-and two inonth.s afterward she married up in Peoria a fellow named Tompkins." "Tompkins !" said the second gentleman, with a .sudden interest; "Tompkins, Peoria, October, 1S72-was her name Theodosia'? Womflu- who had 'limpid blue eyes and always liad a rolling-pin under her pillow on nights the lodge met?" "The same, stranger, the same. Shake, old pard," said the first speaker : "and how was she ?" "ishe was all my fancy painted her," replied the second. "But I had a rival in a stove-lifter for which she had too much affection, and iu January, 1875, the courts of Lafayette, Ind., di.ssolved the bonds betsvecn us, I believe she married again-some rooster named Green, I heard." "I am the rooster named Green, and am glad to make your nequaintance. Gentlemen, I knew your wifi well for over a year, and, barring her vivacity with toasting forks and long-handled frying pans, a better wife I never had. But wo parted last Dtcember, as soon as I could get out of the doctor's hands with a fracture of the skull (in conjunction with a discussion concerning getting up to light a fire-also a bootjack) and I thought the fact of our divorce had been nreviously announced." "But," fcaid the first speaker, -'your name, my- companion in divorce, is Green  the last time she was divorced it was from Brown." -'Brown ? Brown ?" said Mr. Tompkins, reflectively; "there was one fellow named Brown used to tag-after her." "It must be the sa�ie one." "Gentlemen, said the first speaker rcileetively, "this a most remarkable coincidence. When shall we throe meet again. I don't ii.sually drink after breakfast, but this is a special occasion and we may, mayn't we?" So they all went out to the barroom to,getlicr to drink success to Brown, and as they .stepped up to the bar they met a man who said: "Gentlemen, this is IN MOEKONDOM, WALT WHITMAN'S WaLOOKE TO DOM PEDSO, being my treat, l.'ve just been divorced, and . ,       ,     , . ,   ,     , my name is Brown, and I an. going to ^ "'ough which they li treat the hou.so.   Give it a muiie ?ind i '"''""'"V        ""'^ call for the best in the hou.�fi." liis three friends shook liand.-j with him solemtily, c.Kclningiiig three looks of inti-illigonce among t!iemselvo.s, when a weak eyed young man walked in di-agonally, and said ; "See here, you f'el-luwa.-havo g(:t to take a bottle of wine with mc. I'm a iiowty married man ; bridegveum rejoicing to run a race, you know; have .sijmethin,g ?" And so he wandered on till, to get rid of liim, they agreed to go up stairs to the ladie.'i' parlor and be presented to his nuwly-uiiidu bride. Tiiey did so, and lo and behold she was their wife! The .situation was sufficiently embarrassing, but the woman did'nt faint, but simply remarked : "Oh, Mr. Green, glod to meet,you, your face seems familiar tome, Mr. Tompkins? Somehow the name acenis known to rac, Mr. Brown. I seem to vouoUeut your fiico.; any relation to the Browns of Lafayette, Tnd ?' Truly, truth is stranger than fiction. When they reached iho mouth of ]iniigrant Canon, a few days later, one fine August morning, they gazed with admiration upon the city in the wilderness-Great Salt Lake City. The canon opened to the west, high up among the mountains. Below stretched the broad valley, north and south. Above their heads rose snowy peaks; beneath, was a vast plain, belled witli winding streams, and green and gold with grass, orchards, and grain-fields. In the midst of this lovely panorama shone the City of the baints. It was like a fairy Bity, or like a dream. Nearly three months had passed since they had seen a town, and here was u great, well-built and beautiful city. The houses were grey-tinted or white-washed, the roofs were red, and innumerable trees embowered the whole. The plain, in the midst of which the city was sot like a jewel, rolled far to the westward, where it was bounded by the shining waters of Great Salt LaKe. Beyond this towered a range of purjile mountains, their sharp pc-aks flecked with silvery snow. "This is a view from the Delectable Mountains I" murmured Mont, as he sat down. "Putty as a picter," said honest Hi, leaning on his whip-stock, and g,izingat the wonderful panorama. " But it minds me of the hymn- 'Where evory proapeot plc'ascs. And only ma" is vile.' They do say them Mormons will steal like all possessed." It was a diflScult and zigzag road down the mountain-side. Many a wrecked emigrant-\\agon layby the side of the descent, uow continually crowded with the trains of the gold seekers, . At one place, looking over a low natural para pet, they saw a wagon and four oxen, lying in a heap of ruin, just where they had fallen from the diiszy height above. So, with much "trembling and anxiety, they crept down by rocky slopes, beetling-precipices, and foamy mountain-torrents, and reached the grassy plain al last. Here was comfort-an easy road, plenty of feed and water for the cattle, and fruit and vegetables growing in the neat farms by which they pa.s.ied. It was like a paradise. Driving into the city, which was only a huge village, with orchards and grain fie!ds"all about, they were directed to an open square were emigrants were allowed to camp. Fresh meat, vegetables, and new flour were to be had here, and in these unacoustotned luxuries the buys reveled with great delight. It seemed as iflliey wore near their journey's end, ! Tlie mishaps, discomforts, anj perils had passed, were wove floWer-gardeiis, people ii^'ing in houses, and here were families abiding, not camping out for a night. Their tent, whicli had become their home, almost beloved as such, appeared frail and shadowy by the sidj of ilie.-ic substantial and comibrtable houses in whif.h jicopIc actually lived. "We must get up and du.st out of this. I'm homesick," was Hi's plaintive remark.-Noah Brook SC. Nicholas Jor Ahi/. MARK TWAIN'S REPOm OF AN AOOI-TENT. yawp About; culubcila; .-Vl - The following burlesque, which wb fiid among u great many otliers in the Y Sun is so bad tli:it it is aim ijt g.jud, Thus Hall K) Pedro  Tlieri! irt ."oiiiiithiiig I must bully Bnip- ror, it is .voa 1 Tliai-'e i.-i sunnibjdy I lami. oantiirn, you are my oliiai ! Hysiuricul old Top Knot, it shall bo you 1 0, I am wondcri'til I Divine I am from llie crown of my Imt-orcd lild lo luy hesl laps. Divine ihu bvet juice thut aivanlieii through my nrleriul eystt>m. Aorni, spicen, vena cava, probj�ci.�. jug. ular, red .shirt and saspoaders. All auvui'jilly divine. For me Ibo nebulae nmrvied; Forme  ilie earih,  uii-, sky,  uniTuric WEro oonceivsil nud piir'tiriaied; For we pleaiosnurm uiiJ tUo iohthios.san ud, nud lUe oriiitUai'liyucus didporlcd llioiu selves iu the early dawn of the Silurian ages; Fur me lived iho luu;; lias of bully good (I'lloWS. From Adain nml Caia down Is llio Joys of Andrew .Jackson. I urn ihu ujluume of all these things. 1, swathed in glorious red Uatinel, My feel trend oa coailuuntii; my head often iiiauaruiiieiiue.'i I lie aiiK^lii- 1, IVftll of Camden, New Jersfy, am a rallier big Uiiiigl Say you the sung is Walt and not of Ptdro? Bully Bmperur, you've bit it precisely 1 You are looUilcss, inert, bilious, yellJw at aiittron, Cumerado. Why sing oi you, you infectious old po-Icutoie, When there is Walt lo celebrate In veraes, W.alt. the remnrUablo Kojiujh       ^V.^V. I'g the Jimperoi- or any oiher fellow. INCUSTRIAL ITEK3. An Avful Tele^rapbio Blttndsr. A fearful scandal lta.s been caused in London through the error of a telegraph operator. The Milncrsafe is to England what the Herring is to America, Being de-sirous of obtaining some of these safes .'br the safe transportation of his presents i'rom India, the Prince of Wales telegraphed to London : "Send me five Milners-three without drawers." The intelligent telegraph operator got it all right except one word, and that he made "niillincrs." A CO-OPBHATiVB BXPEBIMENT. of new bnea. Tho eounlvy is sadly in need of ppro fancy farmcrB.--Chit;ago Times, ' In Scribiifv fur May, Clia.s. Barnard ha.s a paper on '�.Some hixporiiiipiits in Co-operation," in which he speaks as follows of the Springfiild (Vt.j Industrial Works, ii fiiieccssfiil Co-operative eiitorpii.sH; At llie beni-he.s aru young men and women in about equal iiuiiibers, distributed ac-eoi-diiig to the demands of the Work or ilioir own ability Precisely as ill any mautaetory, , there i.s a voguhu' system of work and a perfect subdivision of labor. By llie peculiar method of selection, each one has the work that the majurity think he or she is bi.'.st .suitc.l to jjcrfiirm consistently with the bestr interests of the establi.-ihment. On going tlirouglit the various departments, one cannot i'ail to notice tiie quiet and order that prevail. There is a rigid ad-hereneo to business that is positively refreshing. Pcrson.s familiar witli work-iiig-peo[ile in mills and shops can readily recall that calmness of manner, and ingenuity in doing iiolhiiig with apparent energy that ohuraetorizu some of the workers. Not a trace of this can bo. seen in the Industrial ^Vorks. The sun gotfe down, the lamps are lighted, and the work goe.von without a pause. It is hummer, hammer, hammer, with all the regu'a-ity and twice the regularity of a clock. The whirling shafts spin steadily, the shavings fly from the planers, the paint brushes slip along quickly in nimble girl fingers It i.s work, work, work with a jolly porsist-enee. The six o'clook boll rings, and nu one seems to discover it till the reluctant engineer turns off the water, and the clattering machinery runs slowly anil finally .stops, as if it also held shares in the company. We may join them at their liberal table; forty or more young men and women in good health and the best ol spirila. They are well-dressed, intelligent, with manners Bolf-rc. a Jis'tale Jifffittcr. Edmund Yates alway.s dictates his novels, and has fur an amanuensis an exceedingly grave and unmitigated man. On one occasion, when about to begin his day's work, Mr. Yates inquired : "Where did wc leave off?" "V/heru we were pressing her lips, sir," replied the Hocretary, in a mattcr-offact way. The closing -sciitonccs of George William Curtis' lecture on "Woine-i of the Old Time and the New," are as fol-lowii: "Yesterday is gone, to-day is come. The fretted .slave of thi* Greek hou.sehold, and the idle toy and doll of the ago of Clicsfcrfield, has given place to a better idea; and we go fbrward, with God's help, lo find the true women in the friic American homes.' George Elliot is a tvcmendous worker and a hard student. Like her husband, .she is an excellent lingui-jt, reading French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Dutch with the greatest easo and witli critical conipichension. Her constitution IK good, but her health is delicate on account of the perpetual strain she put.s upon it. She has eaiued by her pen, it is reported, including her pay for "Deronda," from S180,(iu0 to 5-/l)l),000. Bret Ilarte modestly says: "Of course I am glad that the public appreciate my sketches of the odd characters frequently met with on the Pacific slope ; but you and I and every other Californian know that I have nut half done justice to the subjects, considering the material at hand- 1 have just Btrucb the pick ill, and struck a paying pocket. Somebody else will come along and Diospect in the same hole and strike the true vein." It seems to be delhiitely determined that Winsliiw will not ?)e extnidiled bv the English Government under the terms of the treaty of '43, and therefore the extradition article in that treaty h;is leiniina-tod. Negotiations are at an end, aijii Win.'low will be ili.sch.irged, of course. It is a seriou-i matter, however, and demands the carelul attention of both G iverameats. A new treaty will bek.i)mu n-iOesiary, but in the present temper of the high eon-trading powers, it will be i waste of time. .Meanwhile criminals of eitlier uatioQ are safe if they esc ipa to the  ntcllc�> Is all tli� roartii ot ibt 8|*I�,(taa-Inti titlvi, pni m. , ni�rtgaa�t< ImmmM eontractn of all kluils. WiU auUt iwrtin dttltMK lo luak* lo�M nr burrow uioacr uh lung or �' in*. Ome* over Pljtnagatla Cuautj Bat'k. A.W DVSLETr Attorney at taw, OOlct la n�r tota, �nt IlMf^ 4 rUM^iMtirT. Mlietuu Xidi ut Tnvt&t Ut�t0L   W john i. hUJu, Attorney at Law� Oi-iiuffo Citj-, Sioux Co. ,loiT� e�i)i.�T0N, Attorneys at Law, ODm over Poit Sfllee. Sril It. LIMARI. ^yslclMH tadSargwat. i &ank a. xan'ien, M. ii. Physician % Surgeon J. II. niGGIKSt, M. D. Physician and Surgeon Lnmai's* loira. OlBce over Van.SlckeU tlarilwara ilmfaiid at cui'kH Drug Ktori Htaliloiica cuMitr tth kuil Cvurt alrtttt. J. H. JENKL^S. M. U. Physician andSuigeon LcianrSf I�wa. Siieelol atlsntloD gfTtn to Cliroiile DlimiM, m4 Niirvufii* alTtojiloiis, Rttifldiiic* ou KakU, fi�rth ol i;  i� Oikbi, Dru't Drttf Star*. 6-U yy. U.1 OKTKB, Surgeon andPhysiciaii l.EAt.fVl n bofniind 111 lilaolliciiuvrr Ilcnell'ii Dri't lull hotiM of ilio iluy ur iilnht uiiloat proti'H.iunnllr niigiigMl.   P�rtl� will I'o |)rovlll�U �.ia u,��UiMb�� �l Iho oliico. Oollectlon Agont. IIKMtV liU.SPKKfl, imNDS PItOMPTirTO Ul COLLECTIONS, Oninjjo (I y, low*. Satkeiy. I). II. BEXMCK, Fruit Storo. ICscellatteoai. City Bakery and Restauranl, JIh. ftlu'u.vt Jilnii warm inniiU fur IriiTunnrs, mnil ft Kood euiiliiy uf Ui-iiaU miil Ciikun fur ftmlljr Ujr*. ;. L. �. YOlINO, Dcnlocln FETJITS AND CIGARB AT TIIK Miplaigaxj. Prvdi S^QiT^l. riim-rs It 70u ��Bt t Oael �t of OAS TAKK�S S70CS U8ZS. IV M. mestzkk, Barber & Hairdresser ShuviiiK I'lii Shumpooinn , Done In llie irioiit Hpiirovt-il iilyl* riil nt rjHutiiwbl* ratu>,  N�xt door tu i'lj-iiiDiitb cuuuly Bitik.  M� An ingenious bummer has invented n new way ol getting his liqU'ir. He puts two pint hiitile.i in his c.iiit pocket, one full of water, and the other empty. Then he giics into a rialoon aiiil -lsIw for >a pUit of gill, lianding- out the empty bottle. Vr'lien Im gets the gin he put-i the bottle in his pocket, aud lulU the barkee|M:r to "Hang it up" Uarkeeper naturallv ob-ject.i, and demnml.-i the cash or gin. Bmu-mer reluctiintly hands liim tlie bottle of water, and goes out nmlti.-ring about "jjoiix folks being so eonl'juiidej piirticuler." A committee of the Toroiitn Presbytery has been compelled to recommend the expulsion of the llov. Mr, MeDou-iiell from the Church, for the reasoii that they gravely doubt his asservulions that he believes in that sulphureous, in-eandesticnf, and everlasting perdition of sinners which is the ualm reliance of all good Presbyterians. The grain esports from San Francisco daang the last nine months am>-jiitel \ in value to 813,47rVd!�a. KLUCKHOHN'S 6r/* ^reet Grocery Ii tb� t'luc* vil,�r� > fill) >iu� of U^amily Grroceries ixn.d ^Provisions, All treeb aud fiist-slaat ii alwii}-! kepi. An iqiiiiro deBliii; la  � rniK nf lh|a lioiiM, sll Gooila ata Bold m tUo loweal living prUiea. N.D.-Thehlgbatt mu-kstiMrlf* x*U for ititt^r eggiaiid all kit is of tounlry rnM�3* iTItti-f'tii iSTtlilM. la thanatMM Siga'of 1^ eSic-C�lUr, A.ir.*A. K. llrfiU^i' M�Dtlii( (li* Tiiaiilay on or prtcnd-isKlli* full nfilitMvoa '1>. W. CukU, W. M. O.K. Kxtrr, Bier* i%tj . AIMMSON * PAWMOBB, Hxiuse Sign and Fresco .Pamtere, eiaining, Paperhingin|,'uil Caboffliiiiii|. Blinp on &Ulb Strtct, oppofttf Uubuqiw Uew*. Air war. lutrutloil to a< will reculv* pruuift ktUii- lloo.__________ Oysters I   Oysters! GBANGEB'S BSff'Oi/fifcyg wrvcil �up In^evcri/ Mtyl*. 6@-Il'�'*�� mc^f* and. cold Iwichcn at all hqurx,    {. tff^I'Veiih Brt^. JBitcuit md P/u-tri/ on hand and to order., ]^No p�lnaai�r�d'to nwk* (ucrfl etmfo rtkiil* D6 not fail to call ittth* uaw RMlanrMt on 
                            

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