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LeMars Sentinel Newspaper Archive: March 16, 1876 - Page 1

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Publication: LeMars Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   LeMars Sentinel (Newspaper) - March 16, 1876, Lemars, Iowa                                Om copy, one y�kr (In sdiBnce) Oncooy'emon hi, - . . Oaa copy � month..... Attorneys at Law. J.H.8IBUBLE. STBUBLEBBO'S, Attorneys at VOLUME YI." LEMARS, PLYMOUTH COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1876. TO. 8. DonbIe~eoInmn ailTertlMBwntf IWcBrr-flT* p�* ''���?'�S�lM�rtMnf�|)er liBo for llnif lnTr�to�, nd 10 cent. �lino for ouch '"'V*'''"- .v, Sp�cfal nolio harlng nrecodence of ordfD.�y nrXaIng, 60 per cent In adrtnco of^'fi' AdTwtlaemont. orderwl oot befor. e�pIimtloB  timeagreodonchareed� trenslent. i. SsfiK aantral i.eal Estate, , Ageuta Notariei Public, -.,,Iow.. Loan and Couv< lilrtactlr ln�  tlia coarta ot ihj Ibo titlea, pll^ lax   and make colla complete let  iatedon the uioet { r B. liAWBENC Attorney at Lemarg, Iowa. froBpt and carefnl attention givk,^ :       of clainia, dlaning deeds, niortg ' entractaofallkinda. Will assist i* make loana or burrow money  � iB ta�r room, o^var Blodget I JOHN J. Bl Attorney Oraage CItr, Sioux Co. ' iC. J. ^.'BAI Attorney and Gounsem OrriOS OTftr Foit Offlce ] All Buiinvii entrniteil to hli ci _ ' atuuded to. at aatnnunv, Si ouz City. AR�0 A PEKUL Attorneys atj Oaca OTOr Port Offlce, Rtb I J. H. WIGGINS, FhysiciaiL and Lomars, low* OBca orar Tan.Slckaia Hard war! �acka Drug itora , Kaiidauce corner Bth and Court f Physi J. Jb JENKINS. ] cianandS Lemnrsy low* Surgi '/I peclal attention giren to Olir Varrona aVentloaa, Beaidaaco i Sanuth etraet. Oflioa in Oibbi, 1 BBiVr. B.l'OBTt eon and PI Can bafnand In hie office oTer 1 tiitl hours of the day or night ui---- ngaged. Fartiaa will be provided i 1 mt thaoiHca. _ Oelleotlcn Ageii HENRY UO^PEf ITnNDS PROMPTir TO UL OranifO 11 :y, lov Sftkery, Dfltt. BEKNICI Bakery and del a always nico warm meals for tn I aupply of Bread and Oakea for f Frnit Store. I. B. T0IJN6,| Dealer in LUITS AND C] AT thk KlicelUmeonB. BLACK'S EXFBE$l './The Public can depend . _lkinds of Drawing, Carl Inc autrtisted to me done witl i left at Aldrlch'a will race IM ttUfinl to Eotoli ttirv Wa. BLACK, T>ri Leu WM. HENTZKB, ^er & Hair( B moeV approted style a- l^xt door to Plymouth cuuntyf 01 5^Le- f^snd Yfing it?" i We watch blea d. UPE. God gives us life, nor shows na But tells ua tliat His will is b. ' Westriiggle helples9lj,and die,' . And thea-n e only knows thig^ He marks our sep'ratc courses ouv,. We tollow b indly to the end. ';A Harrassed by trembling frar and^^^t^ life's  lights ana >^^s Men weep ana smil , are sad and i �l Mourn o'er some worshipped id    � But kneel again, 80 mfl brighter da^ *! At other shr iias torsetting all. �tossed for a mnntb, perhaps, or ye 'h. And then-' ah, wcii 1 God willsjo i'\ \ cold grave passed without a tcari ^� But diad hearts never ijrcak, you,,^; Another life is woo'd and won, New lips ore tend erly caressed    ':' While eyes with just a touch of sun Sliine into those your ow n once led And so we live and pass awiiv, We struggle helplessly and die; We look above to God, and pray For life, and yet we know not wh) -Em the kew Hmisraa to esslm- IOWA. Annual Seport of the Secretary of the State AsrlonUnral Soolety. [Special Correspondence of the Chicago Tribune.] Des Moines, la., March 7.-From advance sheets of the Report of the Secretary of the State, Agricultural Society for 1875, I glean a few items which will show the productiveness of this State. Corn has come to be the leading cereal of the State, and. Iowa is makino; rapid strides in its production. In 1870 the corn-crop of the Union was 7G0,-944,549 bushels. Illinois ranked first of the States in in this nroduotion, with 130,000,000 bushels; Iowa second with 69,000,0C0 bushels; Missour third, with 66,000,000 bushels. In 3874 the product was 854,000,000 Dusheli. The present crop is at least one fourth greater than that of 1874, >rhich would make the crop 1,000,000,-000 bushels. But for the early frosts i$d wet weather, the corn-crop of the '^est would have been .enormously sur-pirising. It is estimated that the area planted ;in corn in Iowa was 5,000,000 acres, which, at the ratio of increase of the previous crop, would make the pro-duct of the State 150,000,000 bushels, or'Jjover one-sixth the product of the Union.     But   the   decrease in price 1 of 'Ullll, or , �ai[{ieBB, "able  148 l.?*�d- ^000 J IfMPROWED FARA tjENT INTEREST, oiilars, address Geo. ankcri, CorniDK.  Ii LAWRENCE. Lemi imcoB |Depos| Exeht [00: eoeive. DOHESTIU. ivedSeeu; lUtendcd "on, Sloa: iymouth. J.LBUBOPEANPOR' ^^^^ Ml iMoney; Hons (;oaiiti^^' BT8 so. � Ola^/n.Bmtii Co., Ottai ""''|j�/f4'(�""''> PrivaeBan. ^ Attnided to Jb iij.^; mi At last the vexed problem' Schenck's continuance as Minister the Court of St. James is settled by I nomination of Richard Henry Dana, I of Massachusetts. The appointment an admirable one in every respect, J Dana was born in Cambridge, Mass.,! price more than balances the increase 1815, and graduated from Harva in-quantity, so that the producer will lUniversity in 1837. He first came iniii)trrealize so much as from the pre-public notice as an author, with his livious crop by 86,000,000. The average tie book, "Two Years Before the Mastyjeld is 14 bushels per acre. This is which had an immense circulation inot half what it could be with proper at that time. He was admitted to tljjultiVation. The same" quantity might Bar in 1840, and at once took an enibe raised on one half the number of nent position in connection with tlicres. Shadrach trial in 1853 and that t jphe wheat crop of the past year has Anthony Burns in 1854. He was leen short in yield, and is of inferior delegate to the Buffalo Convention Ouality. For the United States, the 1848, and a member of the State Con ear 1874 is nearly 310,000,000 bush-Btitutional Convention in 1853. Frona. :The harvest of 1874 will show a 1861 to 18C6 he was Attorney-GeneriiijBi�ase in the product of 20 per cent., of Massachusetts. Both as an advocate in'round numbers 62,000,000 bush-and a writer he has achieved an honor and with the quality in oonsidera-able and wide-spread reputation. His in, the,,iesult is not a flattering one to papers on International Law in the iaiciij pjoducer. In 1870, Iowa produced y^cporto-are excellent proofs of his abil-i\4a5,692 bushels; in 1872,32,437,-ity to fill the position. Although he is?* bushels; in 1874, the area sown was not a poker-player or a capper for3,59,900 acres, producing 43,428,008 mining swindles, he will reflect honor Wiels,-an increase in two years of upon the country. Mr. Dana's appnint- il'l)91,172 bushels. Assuming that mentis evidence at last that General jtee was no increase of area in the jK, year, and accepting m u basis the ikitraots of the different counties report-iiand adopting the average yield per �t of the previous j-car, wo have a jiiiJict of only 37,759,900 bushels, or ifarease of nearly 6,000,000 bushels. Mnating it the lowest cash price (50 Ml-per bushel), we have a-deficit of li�),00Q. These losses do not occur iiw State alone. Bat eight States in tKUnion are above the average; and v'lilefowa in 1874 was only 4 per cent bMlbe average, the decrease for the yordosed is 23 per cent. Of foreign CKtlries, Kussia reports a general ii�il-utuid is deprived of its expected hur-VKL France will be a competitor for foiiijn wheat, as her ci-op lia.'i aLio been rej'iHtil afailuie. With a consumption of iiVjst 200,000,000 bnshcls, inelud-iiigitel, this loaves the United States, witUiroduct of 246,000,000, bushels, only WOOO.OOO of the yeai's crop ibr exi�ri, Great Britain consumes 170,-OOWlWlbushels annually, yet does not proiote-nough to feed her population; and,rt;i the United Slates and some of thehropean nations produce more grain the the population can consume, there 15 teh year a surplus for export, and, Ecpaited widely as we are, a good cropin �htr country tends to lower the piicciaaterialiy, while on the other hand, a jor crop tends to raise the jrices. Tl present prices of this cereal lave nosliility, and, with the decrease over tlicviole region, it remains to be seen what Ject these exports will have on the luaset-value of the crop before the close otingther harvest. The receipts uluHat in Great Britain from the UnW Sliates and Canada during the fir.5l(Tin6nths of 1875 were 43,-550,OOl)Wstel8j and of flour, 4,830,578 hundred T?1>'''-' I'he amount of wheat in the I'niie^Stiites and Canada in .sight on thellAiilt.#aa 10,585,389 of bushels, of .'jliicli New York alo'ne had, in store ^nd transifj 6,568,042 bushels. The 'defirtni^t of cattle is prosperous, andslKKii a.markcd improvement during ikeyoar.jIn 1874 there were sales of tetdiofimproved breeds. In 1876 tlieve iterglisevcn public sales,-472 fem>teatst5^,475, and 109 males at $25,625. Df0he.se, fifty-five were sent to olhM Stat^j and the remainder distribuU4 W tlSirty-cight different counties io llii* Add to these individual Eales,     the result is highly satisfactory. , .   . The inicreat manifested in improved breeds of hogs lii^^sumed great prom-' inenco. The Bepshire and Poland-China ari tlieleaii'ng breeds, and seem to meet, the ^cospd of the packer The riumliier of liPg� packed in the State in the ffinW'1874-5 was 409,-927, iigainBl370,7S|, the previous year. which produced about 35,000,000 bushels, and added over $9,000,000 to the wealth of the State for the grain alone. The State product of rye, barley, buckwheat, and flax, which are minor cereals in Iowa, is estimated at $2,323,641. The potato is a great staple in Iowa. In 1874 the yield was 7,590,040 bushels,-an increase of 1,923,380 biishels. Estimating the area at 80,000 acres, at this ratio of increasB the present crop will reach 10,000,000 bushels, producing a revenue of 82,250,000. Here, then, we have a revenue from leading products as follows: Corn (at 25c) � 3,777,777 Cattle 29.000,000 Hogs 6,535.524 Oats 9,000,000 Other gaain 2,233,641 Potatoes 2,5oo,ooo Wheat 18,879,850 S71.9o4,fi82 In less than twenty years Iowa will produce sufficient to feed the world, if she continues to increase according to the ratio of the past two decades. What she most needs is cheap transportation to market. As it now is, it requires nearly one-fourth her product to get the rest to market. Schenck has resigned, and that his resignation has been accepted. ..The only regret the people have in the re-tiracy of Schenck will be that he did not resign long ago. The country may have lost a good poker-player at the Court of St. James, but it has gained a great lawyer, a cultivated gentleman, and a first class diplomatist.-Chicago Trihunc. "You didn' laugh it mv stupidity before we wei'e nmrritd; you always said I was a duck of a lover," grumbled a complaining liuaband, "Ye.", that's so," re plied the wife; "and a duck of a lover is uluioiit sure to make a goose of a bus band, The latest phase of leap-year eccentricity is recorded from Portsmouth, N. H., where a lady clad in deep mnurni g promenaded the streets, the other U ay, with a ribbon in front ot hor toreliead, on winch was embroidered lu wiiito the word "Alone." In order to excite the ambition of the young ladies in her audience, a lady lecturing on woman-suffiuge ih llaino, tlie other day, remarked-tliat if women had political i hflueiices, c'luwing jjum would be put on the free list and kept there forever. A Watervillc girl worked the motto, " I need thee every hour," and presented it to her chap. He says he can't help it. It takes him two Hours to milk and feud the pigs, morning and night, and business bus got to he attended to. The other day a Boston belle rushed excitedly into the liou-ie of a friend to exhibit a $17S silk dress sbu had just purchased; and incidentally mentioned just before her departure, that iier father had failed the day previous and shut up Uis store. Women do more head-work than; that is, it takes some womuii four hours to d( up their hair for an evening party, while a good smart man ran do Uis up In three hours and fifty seconds, easy. A young man much enacftnrcd of a witty young lady attem]>ted to put liis arm about her waist, when she remarked quickly:' Don't you do it, there's a piu-Ijack tliere."  Of course there was. "It doesn't take me long to make up my iniud, I can tell you f said a conceited fop. ' It's always so where the stock of material to mike up is smuU," quietly re maiked a young lady. A father wants to know "What will keep a respectable but poor young man from hanging round the front of the liouse f" Tell him the girl is sitting on the back lenec. A young man at Nashville killed himself because lie could not get another man's wife.- It is terrible to love soma, body, and see her washing windows lor another man. � jlotlier. may I go out to pep I yes uv darilUE daughter-If yon fail this year-yuu must shut up s You've kept longer than yuu,d urtor. A Mexican girl living at Tusceolo has three well doveluped anus. She can do up Ijor hair withoit cramming hor mouth full of hairpins. A Danbury map had a bag of oats last week, which be call* the Seamless, as they wcio't have lu beoj sown. Some one stole thtm. It u> said that figures won't lie; but the (jgiires of some wmneii arii very deocp-tiv�( to say the least If crying babies h id any sense, they nflfflr would take their mothers to inati- y^*?!?, seven hnnd- .yedBuadhist temples in Japan have been coufjsrted to other uses than for worship- t|b^^v. Dr. Behrends has accepted tbe.�il� of the Union, (Jongregat^al chi�>h^t Providence, II, I. .We-total in. [yjfBpy, JIr.Spar- -anincreosec 1 and March 1, _......   .93. Pork-packing is beooiuiMOne of the leading enterprises of tte State. | It has become so systemized that all the animal is utilized. The following � H product of hogs packed between No' 1874-5: , I Number of hogs Average gross ffeig'''jv^''>� Aggregate gross w''. Average yiey oflaril per head, lbs ' , Aggregate pottoiisot aT Average prifle    l"" I"* gross   , Aggregate cost Brls. mess pork Brla. prime mess Brlsi eltiar Brls. riiimp ' , . The oat crop P"""'"'^ prodigious re-tnrDB early'ii, the season, ^but wind storms did much to"!"'^' ^'^^ this.graiu is ncaaly 1,000,000 acres, 409,927 255,711 104,823,208 - 34,576 14,17.3,836 $6.23.48 $6,535,524 23,793 7,595 T 222 CSlTTElTlTZAIi. On the 4t1i of July. 1776, George Washington was 44 yoare old, Martha Washing ton,43j Sam. Xdams, 54;-t/bhn Adnins, 41; Abigail Adams, 32, John Quincy Adams, 9; Thomas Jefferson, 33; Patrick Henry, 40; James Madison, 25; Themas Paine, 39; James Otis, 51; Fisher Ames, 18; William Pitt, 68; Josiah Qumcy, Jr., 32; Nathaniel Greene, 34; Edmund Burke, 46; Joaathau Tuiiibull, 30, Roger Sherman, 55; Aaron Burr, 20; Benedict Arnold, 36; George Clinton, 37; Alexander Hamilton, 19; Uobert H. Eiivingstou, 29, Phillip Livingston, 60; Phillip Schuyler, 48; Benjamin JTranklin, 70; Benjiimiu Hush, 31; Robert Morris, 42; Charlu!' Carrdll, 89; Caesar Rodney, 40; Edward Rutlcgc, 27; William .Moultrie, 45; iioratio Q.ites, 48; John Rut-ledge, 37; Thomas Sumter, 42; Charles 0 Pinknoy, 30; Charles Pinckney, 18, Jaa Monroe, 18; 7'im. Pickering, 31; Anthony Wayne, 31; Vsracl Putnam, 58; RufusKiiig 21; John Hancock, 8'J; Elbridge Geriy, 32; Richard Stockton, 40; George Wythe, 50; Marquis La Fayette, 19; Francis Marion, 44; Henry Knox, 26; Richard Henry Lee> 44; John Jay. 31. Population of the Country-There are sonic notable deductions to be made from the census taken in a number of the slates during the last year- One of the most noticeable is tli-j abrftention frum the polls of a large numtjcr of citizens In fact, this evil seems to bo on the increase. s to increase ot population, the returns from fourteen States (in one ot nhioli, .Michigan, the ceiisuj was taken in 187-1,) show an addition to that of 1870 of at least 2,000,000 persons. The accurale character of the returns from three states -South Carolina, Louisiana, and Texas-are disputed. In the two first named States the enumerations are asserted to have been incompetent. In Texas the returns are an estimate based on a scho o i cenius. The actual increase in the other eleven States is 1,013,000. This makes approximately an increase for the whole ciunt' y ot about six milliois. The present decade when it closes will show a larger proportionate increase than any ol those that have preceedcd it. THE WATCH WAS HIS. [From iho Virginia (Ncv.) Enterprise.] A day or two since Mr. Shaw, timekeeper of the Consolidated Virginia mine, found-a watch lying in the snow, where it had evidently been dropped by some one working in or about the mine. Mr. Shaw worte a notice to the following effect, posting it by the side of the window to which the men eomo to give in their names when going on or coming off their shifts: FOUND. A  valuable  watch, which the owner can have by calling at this ofSce and describing the same. Several men called and described what was according to their ideas a "valuable watch,'' nearly all making it gold with a fine chain of the same metal. Some set a number of beautiful pieces of gold quartz into the links of the chain. But it was "no go'" not a man came anywhere near d3Soribing the watch. At last a little Frenchman came to the window and said; "You find one vatoh, Mistair Shaw ?" "Yes, sir," said Shaw. "Have you lost a watch ?" "Yes, sair, me have lose me one vatch " "Can you describe it?" "Oh, yeS, sair, me can descripe him ver' perfectly." "W�ll, what was it like?" "My vatoh he was a silver yatch." "Very good. What kind of cases?" "Veil, he have he's face wide open." "What kind of chain?" "One leetle brass shain." "What kind of key ?vaa on the chain?" 'Vgll, no key be on zee shain. He have no key at all. I wind him by zee tail." The watch was a stem-winder and the Frenchman had given a perfect description of it, even down to "zee tail." SA003T AND SELmP. Oompariion ot the Two Glrwt Fellom. "Mamma," said a thoughtful youngster the other day, "how old shall I be next birthday ?" "Six,' my son, if you live." "Well, suppose I'don't live, can't having birthdays like [St Louis Qlobt ] A comparison between Bacon and Belknap at first seems a hopeless task. The one was among the first juriata of modern times-the greatest philosopher since the days of Aristotle. For years he filled the positions of English Attorney General and Lord Chancellor, and pronounced thousands of decisions, hardly any of which were ever reversed. His writings are in every library, and bis aphorisms on every tongue. With one exception the purity of his life was such as to command universal respect, while his rules for the guidance of individuals of the human raca still hold their own as monuments to the rectitude of his intentions. Most wonderful of all, his giant intellect looms up as a commander of modern thought. Side by side with Kant and Hegel, leading modern philosophy, Bacon stands, and will probably remain until the character' of the world's thought again changes. In comparison with the imposing presence of the great Lord Chancellor, the bribetaking American Secretary sinks into more than contemptible insignifioance. A petty lawyer, an unnoticed volunteer, a Colonel among a thousand other Colonels, a General, whose title was shared by hundreds of similar rank, a Govern-mpnt officer of inferior grade-such has been the record of Belknap when he was called by. the President to occupy one of the most important positions of the Nation, and came, an unknown and untried man, to take upon his shoulders one of the heavy burdens of administration. But though comparison in general is as impossible between these two men na between the sun and a glow worm, yet, in one, and only one thing they are alike. Each committed a great offense against law, and in each case the crime was bribery, and yet, though the act of Lord Bacon has been universally censured, he.had many circumstances in his favor such as Belknap would be overjoyed to possess. Receiving a bribe in the days of Bacon was very slightly different from taking a fee. The practice of feeing was universal. In the reign of James I there was no civil list, hardly any oflicer of the Church or of the Crown received mure than a nominal salary, and aspirants for wealth were forced,to seek it by the acceptance of the offerod fees. This was also often necessary a means of living. The Secretary of State then received only �100 a year. As Lord Chancellor, Bacon ro ceived the annual arlaryof�81 6s 8d, and Coke, when Lord Chief Justice, drew �225 a year. Of courts, then, every one either paid or received fees, according as he desired or bestowed favors. In the church, the humble, poverty-striokcd nuratc received his fee for performing the ceremony of baptism, just itfithe mitred Archbishop received his lordly recompense Ibr per forming a coronation. In the Courts, the barrister, the advocate, the Sergeant, the Solicitor General, the Attorney General, the Baron of the Exchequer, the Master of the Bolls, the Lord Chief Justice, the Lord Chancellor and the King himself, all received fees. In, the admi.ii^trative departments, fees were taken by the porters at the doors, by the clerks.at the desks, and by the Secretaries of State. With such a universal practice in vogue, it is not strange that the Lord Chancellor should have erred and taken fees when he ought not; nor is it very remarkable that he should have gone further and received bribes. The only wonder is, amid such universal fee-giving and taking, not that the Lord Chancellor and a few others became corrupt, but that corruption was not more wide spread; |not that one man, before eminent fur probity, fell, but that, undci the varied temptations of poverty and lack of restraint, any were left standing. The story of the unhappy Bacon is well known. Advanced from honor to honor, until like Daniel, ho was made the first ruler in the kingdom, and for years no whisoer of evil was even breathed against his name.-During the course of bis Chancellorship he delivered seven thousand decisionif, every one of which must have offended one of the parties to the suit decided, but up to a few days before his im >cachment, none seemed to dream that le was aught but the nuidelof rectitude. In*621, Parliament was convened, and an inve stigating. commit tee, probing into judiciary affairs, discovered corruption. More than this, they a.3certained that the stain was on the ermine of no less a person than the head of the Judiciary, the Lord Chancellor. They did not hesitate, but instantly brought articles of impeahment against liim, although one of the first dignitaries of the realm. Ho was tried, and when the last hope of escape was gone, he confessed his crime, anil threw himself on the mercy of his judges.- Unmoved by the spectacle of his guilty fear, they passed as severe a sentence as the law would allow, and by the unanimous vote of Parliament, Bacon was degraded from his ofii'ce, was sentenced to perpetual exile from the Court, to imprisonment in the Tower during the King's pleasure, and to a fine of �40,000 But the unreasonable severity of the sentence was its own nullification. Bacon's crime, though great in theory, was trivial in practice. Only a few hundred pounds could bo traced to his hands, and several payments, which were supposed to be bribes, were made under circumstances and in the presence of persons such as to throw extreme discredit on the supposition. On these acconnta the King was very lenient to Bacon. , Two day's imprison, ment in the Tower answered the re-quiremeta of the law; next, his fine wag remitted; he was then alloyred to visit of degradation to which he had been subjected, still operated powerfully in the breast of the grea't philosopher and statesman, and though living in his country house in great magnificence, he seldcim appeared in public, but occupied himself in correcting his published works, and in nutting the finishing touches to the great system of philosophy of which he had been the author. Since the days of Bacon public affaira and men have completely changed; officials are no longer dependent on what must be regarded, even by the beat disposed, oa sturdy . begging or polite thieving. A public officer of the grade of Cabinet Minister receives a princely salarjr, and is, or should be, placed beyond tbe temptation of petty stealing, Fee-taking is illegal, except in certain specified cases, and even when allowed, the amount of the fee is rigidly defined by law, and none must exceed it. Even were these eireumstanccs all that enter into the account, the despicable character of Belknao'a transgression would be so inexpressibly lower than that of Bacon as almost to preclude the mention of the two in the same connection. But the worst is not yet. Bacon received bribes from those well able to pay, when he knew the act was done solely lo advance a suit at law; there was thus some decency about his bribery. On the other hand, Belknap's offense assumes the phase of the meanest stealing. He knew when he received the quarterly payments that by his act the cost of necessaries and luxuries to the unlucky troops at Fort Sill was thereby doubled, and yet he had the ineffable lowness to accept regular payments under these con-ditioin. Bacon could never have stooped to such a thing. His noble qualities redeemed the evil in his nature, and entitled him to the famous eulogy of Macauley, "Impeached, convicted, sentenced, driven with ignominy from the presence of his sovereign, shutout from the deliberations of his fellow nobles, loaded with debt, branded with dishonor, sinkiiig under the weight of years, sorrow and disease, Bacon was Bacon still." Pope called him "The wigest, brightest, menneat of mankind.'^ The "wisest and brightest" he may have been, and he may possibly even have deserved the stinging adjective, "meanest;" but it is unfortunate that our centennial year should exhibit an executive officer who can lay no claim whatever to the first two implied qualities, and to whom the the third is wonderfully pat and appropriate. m asiT. [Detroit Froc Press ] It was midnight. The young man had farewcllcd himself out, and Kmiline had locked the door and was untying her shoes, when her mother came down stairs with a bed quilt around her and said: "Wanted to creep up stairs without my hearing you, oh? Didn't think I know it was an hour after midnight, did you?" The girl made no reply, and the mother continued: "Did he propose this time ?" "Why-luotlier I" exclaimed the daughter. "You can 'why mother !' all you want to, but don't I know that he has been coming here for the last year ? Don't I know that you've burned up at least four tons of coal courting around hei^e?" The girl got her shoes off, and the mother stood in the stair door and asked; 'Emelioe, have you got any grit?" "I guess.so." "I guess yon havn't I I just wish that a fellow with false teeth and a mole on his chin would come sparking me.   Do you know what would happen, Erne line ?" "No."' "Well, I'll tell you: He'd come to time in sixty days or he'd get out of this mansion like a goat jumping for sunflower seeds." Emelinc went to bed to reflect over it. I go right on        , ,        ^________^______________,___., George Washington ?" There are some the Court, and finally'restored to his older boys who would like to have their ^ Parliament, and to all his other birthdays "go right on.' prerogatives. Shame, and a keen senee His carpet-bag was packed and his hand on the door to pass out of the house, when she bade him good-bye. She put both arms around his neck. "John," she sobbed, "you are going away." This waij so palpable that it would have been madness to attempt a denial, so he merely observed: "Look out for my collar, Maria." "You will think of your wife while you are gone ?" she whispered huskily, a He was a trifle nervous under the pressure of her arms upon his collar, but spoke reassuringly: "I will bear t in mind, my dear." "You will think of me as mourning your absence and anxiously awaiting your return ?" she murmured. �You can trust me to attend to it?" he replied, with as much firmness as if it had been a request for six barrels of mackerel. "And you'll be very careful of your self for my sake?" she suggested, in a a broken voice. "I will see it attended to, my dear; but it is almost time for the train," and he gravely sought to remove her arms from his neck. "John I John I" she convulsively cried, "don't forget me T' "Maria," he said, with a tinge of reproach in his tone, "I have made a memorandum to that effect.' And then she let him go-still tearful but confident "it would be attended to. The duchess of Edinburgh is going to Russia to get away from the duke, and the duke is going to the Mediterranean to get away from the duchess. For several weeks past they have performed their ablutions in separate wash basins, and eaten their meals at separate tables. The queen mother looks on in quiet despair, merely remarking: "My dear children yon began wrong. You were tpij affeotioDate-you shouldn't have nsed so tnuch kipdiing woodsaf the start.-[Brooklyn Ar|p8. , The Town of Ba�l areen, XTearly Sued. Wisoonsin, Chicago, March 11.-A jjgst ter-tifio wind, rain and thunder storm is reported by special dispatches to have visited the Northwest this afternoon, and to night it seems to .have extended froji Quincy, to the northern portion of Iowa, and to have been specially severe along the banks of the-MisSi-^sippi liver, the town of Hazel Green, in the south east corner of Grant County, Wisconsin, containing about l.ooo inhabitants, chiefly lead miners, was visited by a tor nado which swept from south west to northeast, taking in its course some thirty buildings and destroying many lives. It was at first reported that 41 wers killed or severely injured. But this is believed to be an exaggeration. There is no direct telegraphic communi cation with Hazel Green, but the facts were learned from messengers sent to Galena and Dubuque for medical aid. A Tribune special from Dubuque gives the following list of killed so far as known: Joshua Richards, Mrs. John Looncy, Mrs. Thos. Richards, the wl'fe, inotlmr, and daughter of Tho.s. Edwards; a son of Joseph Jackson; Edward Thompson and father; nine persons in all. There was a rumor tiiat eighteen per sons were killed, but it cannot be authenticated. A great many were biidly injured. Tha storm burst on Hazel Green, at about 4 o'clock v. M. The town was built entirel'e of wood and the tornado had a clean sweop Later par ticulars will be sent if obtainable. aSOWTH OF 8>iOT3 Iff THE LAST BVHSEES 7EASS. As regards the growth of sects, it is stated that "a century ago'* the more important religious bodies (tested by the namber of churches) were ranked in the following order: Congregational, Baptist, Church of England, Presbyterian, Luthren, German Reformed, Dutch Reformed, Roman Catholic. By thVceh-sus of 187o they stood: ftlethodist. Baptist, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Christian, Lutheran, Congregational, Protesta'nt Episcopal." The growth of religious organizations has outstiipped the growth of population. At the beginning of the Revolution there were less than l,95o with a population of 3,-560,000, showing a ohttrch for every l,7oo souls. There are now more than 72,000, which with a population of 38,-000,000, would show a church for every 529, "In other words, while the population has multiplcd eleven fold the churches hare multiplied nearly thirty-seven fold." FO�T SILL FSICES. Capt. George Robinson, of Baltimore has in his possession a number of bills of items covering the period between 18G9 and 1872, in account with J. C. Dent & Co., and their suocessoss, J. S. Evans & Co., military and Indian traders at Fort Sill. PRICES ON THE PRONTlEtt. An idea of the prices may be formed by citing a few items as follows; Two bushels of potatoes, $lo.oo Five gallons of coal oil, $lo. Two pounds of cheese, 80 cents. Six boxes of matches, 75 cents. A bottle of soothing syrup, $1.50. A broom, $1. Flat-irons, 35 cents per pound, A tin pan, $1.50. A half bushel of potatoes, $3.25. A paper of needles', 25 cents. Two pounds of crackers,   1.2o. How a Fellow Feels When He Beachei the Blaok HiUs. ''' A Denver man writes frcm the Black Hills as follows.- CusTAH CiTv, Jan. 29, 1876.-Dear-: Tills is.tlie devil's own country. It you have a grain of charity in your soul, send me |25. Pnn't say yuu haven't it. If you can't get it otherwise, gc to church and and steal it from the coutribution-box, and then you wouldn't have half the sin on your soul that you will should you leave me here. I3al luck to this country. I will tell you all I know when 1 get back to Denver, But I haven't money enough to walk. For the pure love of God, don't throw me away, Ibr I covet the threa cents I have to pity fortius letter's postage. Don Carlos is 6 feet 3 inches tall, but not every inch a King. M rs. Bel k nap is a Prosbyterian. Does she bchmg to the New or Old School r The Philadelphia Times says^Bc-lknap was a subtle man but Marsh was a sutler. Annis Montegue, of the Kellogg Oper� Troupe, was born in tbe Saudwicb. la-lands. Goiiot left a "Popular HistmyofEng. land" in manuscript, which is shortly to be printed. Edwanl King says Castetar as an orator "invests the commonest" matter with hia almost divine afflatus."    ,     -Gen. Garfield gwctrs ho is a Hiiyps man. Dr. Loring, of MussacbusDtts, is for Blaine, Senator Eaton, of Connetticut, is ingratiating himselt.with the inflationists of his State. Gov. Tildcn has not yet brought to jus-  tico the officeiB who ojunivtd J at tlie escape of Tweed. Judgr! Hoar would not: have accept�d. the Secretaryship of War if it had beea tendered him.    "^'_, Priyat�.DalzellJs-after the Republican nnminiition for Congress in the Sixtetiuth Ohio District. Olubs are trumps in Boston. Hufficanes are reported on tbe Atlantic. Naples has been having a splendid carnival. Prince Leopold is musical-flute, wo believe. The British army is to receive an accession ot 3,600 men. �Wiiislow has uosmall vices. Chalk one lor the smokers. Piper is to have a new trial. 'Pity they didn.t bag him the first time. The doctor who cured the Sultaii'a carbuncle received $4,000 in gold. "Give ua rep-ublicnn siinp;icity,":l3 dow the cry, Dr Dio Lewis, and calico dresses. Hydrate of chloral, externally applied, is said to be a sure cure for ulcers, The Queen of Greece has been delivered of a daughter, a little farthing candle of a thing. Chinese soldiers are fine fellows, brave as lions when the enemy is afar off; and they will steal. A barrister in good standing and an Oxford "honor man" was recently arrested in London for begging. Heads are made to look^small in London at present. It is different in Washington j they are being cut off. Qenenil Foil Peiicker, to whose sagacity Qermauy owes the adoption of tUc needle gun, died iu Berlin recently. Synimes Jelly is wanted $1,000 worth in Rising Sun, Aurora, Mo. Symmos hiis a sweet name, but lie is a slippery youtli. The Brcoklyu Eagle gives credit for keeping up the scandal so long to a certain class ot ministers and religious editors. Mr. Bennett's wedding is anounced for the third week in April, and is expected to ^be tlie most brilliant of the past many seasons. General Sherman displayed n good deal of sagacity when he changed . bis base to ; St. Louis.  He bnd not marched to tUo ; sea for nothing. The Geurgiaus admire Edwin Booth as \ Hamlet, but they admire him still more j beeiiuso he had a brother, and that broth- \ er a murderer. "X." a Brooklyn man, thinks that, ol-though Bowen can give "an opinion as isi an opinion," he is not half so honest a man] as Jack Bunsby. Some time ago, says the Norristown (Pa.) Herald," Jacob Klinok, a farmer near Fox Chase, was sawing down a large chestnut tree, when the teeth of the saw came in contact with some me-tallio substance. Fearing something explosive, he directed the workmen to saw on the other side of the tree. They did so. After the tree had been felled, a gold watch, two gold pencil-cases and a chain were found imbeded in the wood, eighteen inches from the surface. They were wi-appcd in a soiled sock, the tree was sawed oS' very close to the ground, and they had evidently been hidden at the junction of two roots, and the wood had grown over and inclosed them. The watch was old-fashioned, having a case which could be detached, and was inscribed with the date 1740. One of the pencil cases was provided with a pen. The other had only a pencil, and was minus the seal. The chain was long, and was intended to pass around the neck of the wearer. There was also a gold watch-Kcy, which, however, did not fit the watch. The tree had attained a great age, being about six feet in Ai ameter. An old manaion qnce stood near by, and it is supposed that the arti cles in question were burled daring the .War of the revolution.    ...... .. The doctrine of ohapoes is, eyerything the man wHo; jperfqrms i|)^d4y5m>cim According to the Home Journal, Ihe] amount of jewelry worn upon the necks] of ladles in Washington this winter was| something unpiccedentcd. Governor Rice, of Moss-achusctts, is perfect gentleman, and not above picking! up a bundle for a poor Irish woman upoti| the streets of Bostuu. Stiould another deluge take place pr vious to the millennium, Koah's .Sunda] Times, of New York, flatters itaeU that i will be the only journal saved. 'Theru's millions in it," if somubodf will ouly get up steamboat excursiuu's I tween New York and Philadelphia, . keep the passengers a week "on board.", t Wait Whitman's iortlicomiug poetr; says the Norristown lluraUi, don't cbyn worth a     t-uule!>s yim would call pie" and    mokestack" a good rhyme. The     vYoik Herald hits a pliice j "Eiiga    "people above its "Mmriag notice    "No cards"  are nduui).  Ti>l mean    e presume, that uo more tetloa need apply. The Duku of Cambridge has issued ders that licucefortli young soldiers sre-i to be balled by uoncouiiuli^iunud , but treated witii kindncs.s and criosiite Ex-Senator Brownlow's duughteri nie was recently married -I'|ii JLnosrd Tenn.  She gout, to little Bock, Ark| live.. .su The poet Whittier is about to moTOj residence from Amesbury to Pe TbeMerrimac Valley momns its luaH' Caleb P. Marsh, the  chief witi against Belknap, made b^a:'lottuaa�  tct^ Government troops d'lring^the ww^| *Qen. Sherman sayaMr^^^^   

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