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LeMars Semi Weekly Post Newspaper Archive: February 1, 1901 - Page 1

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Publication: LeMars Semi Weekly Post

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   LeMars Semi-Weekly Post (Newspaper) - February 1, 1901, Lemars, Iowa                                cml-IUcclilg Post X^iablished. Every Ihiesday and Friday. EQUAL RIGHTS TO ALL AND SPECIAL PRIVILEGES TO NONE. VOLUME vm. LEMARS, IOWA. FBIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1901. NUMBER 13 A SPASM OF CHARITY Pap Pcrklnii, Fontmniitcr, TcIU How i the   Conirlbotlon   For  llio   Needy WldoTT Won Started nnd Hon- It Wa� Abruptly Cloned by a Report From Iilih nuitnRi. [Copyright, 1000, by C. n. Lewis.] The Wlildor Jackson, relict of Tom jJackBon, had been ono of us in Jericho for 15 years. She monagoil somehow 'to toko care of herself until a long, lln-gertn slcUuess came, and oven then Bht suffered for care rather than let 'onybody know of her situation. It leaked out, however, nnd Jabcz Thomas was ono of the Urst to hear of it. Uo dropped Into tlio postofDcc one evenin and told about It and then said to the crowd: "Feller Citizens-If Jericho has o per-tlckler strong p'int, It is chnrlty. No man, woman or child ever j'lt called upon her In vain. It has bin our pride and our boast that we was a community with a heart to feel for tho sorrers of others.  Up there on tho bill, as I bo (iepenrtod upon to do ns much as any other hrart In Jerldio. The paper >ymt vouiiil.imidi^iifliv-Mtjftim thglt nn�ici from lO'td'BQ MinrJ!^ Iiad niiuxplanntlon to pij)ko. Uo yps, bnly throwiiv out a feelmv but poulif^iif)' depended upon for $100 If there was' need of it. Tlie sum of $1.80 had bin raised nnd thoi-o was a Kencrnl fcelln all through the crowd that Jericho was doln herself proud when LIsh Hillings came sauuterlu In. Dcncou Spooner at oncu explained tho case to him and nddcd: "LIsh, yon are known to bo a big hearted man, and we all know you will bo glad to contribute to a worthy cause.  Give us your name." "I see," said LIsh as hu took tho paper, "that you hov raised ?1.80 for a bIcU nnd distressed widder who has lived among us tor 15 years." "Wo licv." "And it's all goln to bo hers?" "IJvery cent of it." "And you want me to make It up to >2 and do old .Toricho proud?" "That's It, LIsh." "Waal, you'll hev to excuse mo. The widder don't iiappen to need the con-Irlbullons of our throbbin and sympathetic hearts. She died about an hour ago, nnd her sister Is comlu down from Albany to bury her!" M. Quad. jack tar's growl. "CKNTLF.mkn," baid TnB dkacos. hev bin told within tho last two hours, lies a poor old sufCerin woman, tlio �wlilder of Tom Jackson. Sho needs food, fuel and medicine and has needed 'ein for days, but now that we hev come to know It tlio heart of Jericho will give a migiity responsive throb nnd hasten to relieve her case." There was n good deal of surprise over the statement, and everybody had said how sorry ho was when Deacon Spooner rapped for order nnd said: "Jerlcbolans, when Jabez Thomas tnlks about the charity of this community ho makes a strong p'lnt-a mighty strong p'int. Wo ail knew Tom Jack-sou for nn honest, burdworkin man, and his widder sliall not appeal to us In vain. I for ono shall esteem It a privilege to contribute to her boneflt. Let us hear from Enos Williams." ' I Enos rose up and said that ho used to go flshin with Tom Jackson and that bad ho known of his widder bein bard up ho would hev divided his last turnip with her. Sho was n good woman and a woman respected by all, and too much could not be dono for her. As soon as reachln home bo would send bis wife over to see what could bo done, and of course his wallet was wide open for contributions. Hezekiah Davison wanted to say n few words also. He begun to talk about the discovery of America and tho pilgrim fathers, but Deacon Spooner choked him off and got him down to the outbreak of tho civil war. llo'd hev hung on there If he hadn't bin jogged ag'ln, and It was a quarter of an hour before he got around to say that ho was awful Borry.for tho Widder Jackson and want-' cd tfl^bo one of tho first to prove his big honrtodness. Four or flvc others bad their say, and then Ilohry Schoni-crborn held up a paper and said: "As I take It, wo arc all of us ready and wlllln to make up a little purse for the suffierln widder'/" "We nrol" called everybody at once. "Then there's nuthin to prevent. Bo-la (is Jebez Thomas was first to make known tho case, he should hev the s      honor of beIn tho first to put bis name down on this paper." Jaboz bung back, no said be was only a humble citizen and didn't want to put himself forward over others-While his heart throbbed and bled and bobbed around, he'd givo way to Deacon Spooner and come In second. ' "Qentlemen," sold the deacon as ho looked around In a lonesome way, "I hev bin a resident of Jericho less than 20 years, and 1 don't want to assume the privilege of an old pioneer. It's an honor to bead that paper, but I dasn't claim it wbcti so many better and older citizens aro before me. I don't want to hurt nobody's feelln's by boostin ono man over another, but It do seem to mei under all the circumstances, that Squnr Joslyn l� the man to write bis i V' (ifUnmo.      of anybody ln*|fei^lcbo/' u Tho squaf was red InJthOffooe as he 4    ,J:aBO uj). nndboaidn't looU.BJh t.plMs- ,  ,8b �8lioBRid: '.'��:�� i.t.' /.,; "       "Vblle 1 mnyiba.tho oldest jresldont; of Jericho, nobody has ever beard mo "    hrnat of It or thrust inysolf forward on that account.  In slgnln papers otthls . Bort I bcv alius ^in satisfied to come In Bistb or Beveuthi and It shall be so In this cose.  My heart Is open, and niy wallet' Is open,'but I'd suggest that '  llloses'Perkins head the list.  I lindor-stand that ho     the Inmchtcd Tbdm-' J'�s JaoUson o|Bd to ship butter and eggs on Bharc8,''{tiid It seems'appropriate that ho Bhouid hev this great honor." :       Moses got up and began to talk of ^ ^eorireWashington aud BunUcr QUI, bni OeBc6n Spooner rapped bim down .   idBd. held Uluj to tUo c��e la hand^ Then ' , \fk tried to sny sometbjD about the ^ plorlou*, -Fourtlii but. hein clioksd y 'U M'lti, Ije toolt tbo paper 3J0d put bl� �! ;��Apif (io>v,� fjir m'�ents, .IJs-,fi?^lal� y .:;,45ftt#>j'r^li8t     woBttBtafl. A.   iiary   rilnitratlnir   tlio   Sailor's Ilnltlt of Urnin1[>lliiK. The author of "From Kdinburgh to tho Antarctic." writing of tho sailor's hiibit of gruiubiing, says: "The dinners are nil the rame-that Is to say, Monday's dinners are ail alike, and what we have today we shall have this day six months honco. Jack's forj^father this day 100 years nso had the snme menu nnd made the same uucompli-niontary remarks aboiit the dlslie.s, nnd 10(1 years hence on this day Jack's children will growl over tliojr salt horse and pIumlcKa du(T." The author al.so tells this "yarn" to Illustrate that Jack's habit of grumbling can't bo c\n-cd and must lie endured: Once upon u time there lived a skipper wlioso wife said to lilm that If she went to sea the poor men would never find fault with their food. Her husband took her with Ulir. on a voynge, nnd the good woman attended to the cooking in tlie galley herself. Tiie scouse was thick with fresli vegetables, the bread wn.s white nnd without weevils, the niont was good, nnd the duff was nluio.st half plums, but still tUo men growled. Then the skipper's wife thought of the lions she had brought on board to lay eggs for her hustand's breakfast. She took them out of tho coop, wrung their necks with her own fair hands, plucked thorn, roasted them and sent them to tho forecastle on tho cabin china. "Now tho men," sho said to her.self, "will know how much wo think of their comfort." At eight bells she stole forward t/t tho forecastle to listen to tho praise oV her skill as a cook. Sho looked dnwe the batch and saw a big black fist plunge a fork Into the hen and heard a hoarse voice growl, "I say, Bill, what rt'yo think this 'ere bloody fowl died of?" MAY RESULT SEItlOURLY. A Miracle 0 in the home orBTTO?BMlSBKTOTMtteoln�| township has caused no small degree of uneasiness in the southern part of Plymouth county. Somewhat more than two weeks ago the afflicted man was taken ill nnd several dnys lapsed before it was deflnately known that ho was afflicted with tho dread disease. Shortly after ho was taken ill a social gathering was hold at the Karker. home at which about forty gnests participated and as a natural conseqnence they were all exposed. A few days later the physician was called who noticed well developed symptoms of smallpox, who immediately took precautionary measures to prevent a spread of the disease. The authorities were notified who established a strict quamtino of the premises of the sick man and also quarantined those who were known to have been exposed. The family of Jlr. Karker were also immediately separated, none of whom have thus far shown any evil symptoms. The hired nmn who had beeii qmjiloyed on Mr, Karker's fartn.htis beeii ta|(eh iU with tho dlseaso ttiid, is' 1)81: coihti|lance wl stij,teltoi;i ,qt| ih 'that vlciu vaccinated so as to prevent any possibility of an epidemic to follow exposures which might have occurred to others from those who were exposed at tho social gathering. Mr. Karker is the of opinion that ho caught the  ,">yfjnt ,tQ p.t^iih^.^ii^ .^e-sponsO'tOi a tologriim to got his inopW.' Moral Offeot ol Plutol Totinv. When a man carries a pistol constantly, slipping it Into his pocket cv cry nioinltig and taking It out at night, feeling Its constant pressure agnlnsi his person, these things tend to fa mil' iarizo Ills mind'with the idea of klllln| and lowers bis conception of tho sa-crcdnoss of human life. What does a man carry a pistol for? To shoot somt other man with. The miserable thins Is iBsdo expressly to kill human beings. It has no other earthly purpose. What a-hardeulng clTect It must have, then, upon tho coosctenco and heai't of ft man who carries It-constantly tn his pocket and lives In daily contact with :;lt aud with the Idea it coustautly sug-gpsts (0 his mind! ,Let us worn youqjF men ond old opes qot to carry plsto^ fjad'4h?�iyatt wJU ftvoKj dolpg ft rMlf Tho DosMoines Leader speaking of tho establishment of a now dioeeso in tliat city says: Local Catholics who are interested in tho creation of a new diocese in southwest Iowa, of which they want Des Moines made the see city, say there is every reason to ho-leivo tliat favorable action will bo taken on their petition within a short time. They say that it is not necessary to refer tho matter to Rome and that the power to make the division is vested in Arch'ijishop Keano of Dubuque. They claim to have information to the elTect he is favorably disposed to the division. Some opposition has been encountered from tho clergy of the proposed diocese and not a little from tho clergy of tho east part of tho present dioeeso. Advices from Dubuquo aro to the effect that about fifty letters from priests opposing the change have been filed in Dubuquo with tho poittion for division. It is understood that some of tho opposition comes from Des Moines. Tho backers of the petition say they do not foar defeat unless it comes from tho clergy, and boleivo tho number who will bo opposed to the division is far loss than tho.so who will favor it. ' Correspoudenco received in Dos Moines from Dubuquo would indicate that it will be the policy of Archbishop Koane to turnover the management of church properties in tho hands of tho bishops and priests. It is claimed that ono of tho first stops will bo to divorce tho management of St. Ambrose cemetery from tho church and place its control in the hands of trustees who will keep all revenues separate and apart from the church funds and use them exclusively for keeping up the cemetery, etc., A gentlemen who says that ho has re coived a letter from Dubuque convey ing word from tho archbishop, said: "It will bo his policy to place proper ties almost entirely in the hands of trustees representing the congregations nnd to advocate the listing for taxation of all properties held in the names of bishops or priests and not used for strictly religious purpose". A Metropolitan Dally Paper. The Des Moines Leader Is the only real metropolitan newspaper o( which Iowa can boast. , Its fearlessn^Bs and "in'dependcnoe In all things, and. the scholarly ability vrith wlitoh It Is edited, have earned tor It dletlnction of being pre-eminently �'Iowa's Greatest Dally." Sherirr'b Sole, Notico hereby given, peplttl oxooutfon, to ID8 that by vlrluo of _ sneolul uxoouuon, to me directed Usuod out ot the olork's olBce of tho UUtrlot court, of of ...WINTER CLOTHING... ^HIS means a sale prcparatoi-y to the reception of our Sprino- stock which will coinmetice to roll in on us next month, and we must make room. The great and genuine slaughter will Jan. IS, and Continue fof a Short T'me Onlf. Commence Saturday, In our suits, where great reductions are manifest, we have classified them into lots according to qiialit}'. They are broken tots, but if we can fit you, you will never get a greater bargain. They consist of Cheviots, Worsteds, Scotcli Suits, Plaids, and Stripe Suits.   They are all new goods but broken lots. LOT 1 - Suits from S5 to 6,50 go at LOT 2- Suits from $7 to $9, go at $3.65 $5.65 LOT 3- Suits from $9 to $12 go at $7.65 $9.65 LOT 4- Suits from $12.50 to $15 For the (luality of the goods, such b;u-gains are unheard of-but we want to force tlic sale of tliem and the great reduction in price we expect to accomplish our purpose. The exceedingly mild winter finds us with a larger stoclc of... Men's and Boy's Ulsters OFF than we want to carry over, and in order to moye them have made a clean cut of 25 PICR CENT ?F RKdUIvAR 1M>J1C]C.   These Ulsters are high quality of CliinchiUa or Irish Frieze. Hurry along and get the cream of the bargains before they are all gone. SCHINDEL & HOWARD FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS, -LE MARS. IOWA. PERSONAL. Nittert Anlfs left yeslnrcliiy fur Kivlv-villo, Mo. G. E. Ulohardson has roturiiod from his MInnosotii trip. J. J. Gehlon was a business vlsilor to Anthon Thursday. C. H. Hiirp has returned from liis business trip to CliicuKo. T. M. Zink wont toOriinj,'o City tliis morning on loKiil iiusinoHS. Goo Kass of Ueinsen was transuollnj,' business in LoMars Wednesday. Job Uaron of Slonx Cltj is in town today visiting with his In-otliers, M. Liinibnrto, of Mureus, visited in IjoMiirs today witli V. N. Trit/. Fred D. Mooro went to Akron liiis morning to visit witli liis piireiits. .Tohu Catheiirt, of KiuKuley, was ii Lo^tai"B business visitor Weilncmliiy. Mr. I'hlllps of i^lymouUi lownnlilp was In LoMars WodncBday    Imsiness. Nlttort Alfs loft Thursduy fyr Klrlts-vllle, Mo. wboi'o ho will uontlnuu his BtudloB In Dr. Slill's Jnutiiiito of Osteopathy. Wm. Forrette roturued on 'rnuMdiiy from an extended visit ^witli lolatives and friends in tJiilcago. Mr. and i\Irn. Chiis. Jones and son Lludgle, ^of Miiuriee, spent Sundiiy with relatives in LoMurs. Mrs. HaiTiot Perry, of Cliioii({". '� visiting in LeMars, tlio guest of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Jlogdu'iin. Harney Kramer, who Ims b(!�n visiting in tho southern states lor Honie tlnie retiimed homo lust yaturday. Mrs. E. G. Will loft on JMonday evening for LaCross, Wis., cnlhid there by the sad news of tho deutli of her mother. F. Beglun is transauting husiiieHH at his old homo in Enimott.sburg this week He will soon move his family to LoMars. Mrs, B. H. Round was culled to Port Dodge on Tuesday by a telegram aii-nouuointj tho serioHsmjipss qI Mrs. Oliu ttounds (ind-the, lift by,     '-   ' J. F. Kass iand ail
                            

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