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LeMars Globe Post Newspaper Archive: April 10, 1944 - Page 1

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   LeMars Globe Post (Newspaper) - April 10, 1944, Lemars, Iowa                                LE MARS GLOBE-POST THE LE MARS GLOBE-POST Kntcred �� sMnml'ifons' motlnr""�it"-lhi post offjce in LcAfura, Igwji, under lh  Convinced that his well-financed campaign could hot succeed, WiHkle wilted again when the returns same in from Wisconsin, Wisconsin will have no Gki-balobey, that's for sure. ' Another result of the Wisconsin election was to show up the utter unreliability of most polls. Most of them admitted that Dewey was stronger than Willkie, but none, apparently, had an inkling of the crushing defeat in store for the Barefoot Boy of Wall Street. Willkie is now set to exploit whatever "nuisance value" he has left. There are hints that he'll come out for Roosevelt. So: what? He's been for Roosevelt'all the time, and the only reason he was a candidate was to "throw" the electi'on to Roosevelt. The voters had come to realize it,, and that was the reason for his repudiation. Roosevelt Wouldn't "StanJ Up To Be Counted" By S. B. Pettengill The soldier vote hill has now become law'but without the signa-turee of the president.. At the last � moment, Mr. Roosevelt declined to accept responsibility for either signing the bill or vetoing it. In short, he decided not' to "stand up and be counted." It is easier to preach than to act. One would think this would be a good time to let bygones be bygones and promote national unity. Since the bill became law, however, Postmaster General Walker, former democratic national chairman, has expressed the view that a complete ballot for candidates, local, state and national, cannot be delivered to bur men overseas. Again,, one njight hope that the Postmaster General would now cheerfully abide by the law of the land, and, with the Army and Navy, make-every effort to get the ballots over i and back so that every soldier and sailor who wishes to vote can do and have his vote counted. That ihe administration's fury over tills matter a few weeks ago was chiefly "a. political gesture, has nmv been made plain, despite the many l'ecUsiiiffian statements about "playing polities with the war." We have now learned that the Ministory of Information, an official organ of the British government which is largely mfftoiincd by lend-lease money from the United States, contributed by American taxpayers and bond buyers of ever,' party, has delivered to American troops in England leaflets which can only be construed as favorable to a fourth term. Congress was clearly right in insisting that the proposed "bobtail" ballot would be constitutionally invalid unless the states by act of thei'r own legislatures adopt- ed the federal law, and made it their own law. With. reference to Congressmen and 'Senators, the issue is somewhat clouded by two differenct provisions in the! Constitution respecting their election, but; with respect to presidential electors, there is no question that the way in which they shall be elected i's exclusively under .the' jurisdiction of state legislatures. The Constitution provides that "every state shall appoint in ssuch manner as the legislature thereof may direct" the presidential electors from that state. For many years, the presidential electors were chosen by state legislature, and again reversed themselves in favor of popular electi'ons. It was not until 1872, S3 years after the Constitution was adopted, that every state in the Union provided for popular election of presidential electors. Even in 187G, Colorado having so recently been admitted to the Union that there was no time to provide for popular election, the Colorado legislature chose the presidential electors. This was the year of the famous Tilden-Hayes controversy, when Hayes, after a bitter contest, was declared elected, 185 to 184. Nevertheless, i'n the terrific scramble for electoral votes that year, the legality of Colorado's choice by state legislature was not questioned. Although no one would now urge it, the fact is that any state in the Union could constitutionally change its law and provide for choice of presidential "'electors by the legislature rather than by the people. The legislature, in fact, could constitutionally empower the governor of the state to name the presidential electors. It will startle even a good many teachers of civics in our public schools to learn that no citizen of the United States, soldier or civilian, has a vested, constitutional right to vote, either for president or presidential electors. That, however, is the fact. In short, no act of Congress, whether signed by the president or not, .could waive registration and provide for absentee ballots and be valid in any state unless the state legislature itself adopts the congressional provisions. L By Samuel B. Pettengill Here is the dope on the eleven special congressional elections to fill vacancies since, the election m November, 1942. Of course, the GOP has won 8 and the New Deal party 3. Fi've of the 8 Republicans gained seats. Two democratic victories were in strong democratic districts. As against the result in the last regular election in 1942, the 6th Missouri di'strict shows a republican gain of 8'/r; the serond Kansas, a republican gain!of 11%; the 4th Kentucky, a gain of 10%; the 2nd Pennsylvania," 7%; the 17th Pennsylvania, 23r/r", the 23st New York, a republican � gain of 14% (the democrats earned this dis-. cralic); the 23rd Pennsylvania and| trict in 1942 and it continues clembVj the 32nd New York, both re pub* lican i'n 1942, continued heavily republican in the special elections, but in each case with a Republican percentage loss of about 1%, the 1st Colorado district showed a 6% republican gain., The 2nd Oklahoma district, democratic in 1942, continued democratic in the special electi'on two weeks ago, with a! republican per-ccntage loss of 4r/r. The 2nd California district, republican In 1942, in an election in which no democrat ran, went democratic last August. In that district, however, under the peculiar provisions of California law, there were two republican candidates and their combined vote was 60% although the democrat won. This is the only district in which the democrats gained a seat. In 1942, of course, there was no presidential election and it may be of interest to compare  the result i'n the special elections with those in 1940. As against 1940, the special election in the 6th Missouri district showed a republican gain of 129?-; tho second Kansas, a republican gain of 14%; the 4th Kentucky," a gain of 23%; the 2nd Pennsylvania, a gain of 18%; the 17th Pennsylvania, 21%; the 23rd Pennsylvania, 4%; the 32nd New York, 3%; the 21st New York, 24%; 1st Colorado, 14%; 2nd Oklahoma, a republican Tain of 8%. In the 2nd Oklahoma, therefore, although the GOP lost 4%, as against 2 years ago, they gained 8%, as against 4 years ago. Although Mr. Roosevelt generally runs stronger than New Deal Congressmen do in off year elections, these last figures indicate than even as against 1940, when Roosevelt ran, there has been a strong republican percentage gain in every district except the 17th Pennsylvania, where it fell eff slightly, although the district went strongly GOP. Having ventured to predict heavy republican gains early in. 1942 which were justified by the event (despite the Gallup Poll), I intend shortly to attempt to forecast Mr. Roosevelt's chimes next November, if he decides -to run for a fourth term. Forecasting this years is especially hazardous because something might happen a week before the election which would make the presidential compalgn a landslide one way or the other. As of today, I express the simple opinion that the GOP will have a hard but not impossible battle to defeat Mr. Roosevelt although it seems reasonably .certain that it will control the House of Representatives, make gains in the Senate, and gains everywhere in ] local and state elections. j Although   some   commentators j express the view that it is un- j fortunate that we must have elec- ; tions in time of war, I think a more stable peace can be written by whatever administration is in power after .next January, as a result of ascertaining the will of the American people next November.   Nor do I think an election will weaken the war effort. On the contrary, we will fight better when it is over-regardless of who is elected president. FOREIGN ENTANGLEMENTS BY L. L, CORYELL, SB. We are now faced with seri'ous foreign entanglements against which our forefathers warned us. Why were we surprised at Pearl Harbor and-atGermany's attack on us? We were supplying their enemiss with war materiel, including 50 ships to England. We put seven billion dollars in lend-lease before Pearl Harbor. '''�., Our allies, England and Russia, are not on speaking terms.   Our agreements at Teheran have been violated by Riis-ia.   We promised definitely in. the Atlantic Charier to guard and take care of the Balkan States yet our ally, Russia, is trampling them down.   President Roosevelt had personally denounced Russia's act in her destruction of Finland. The League of Nations had expelled .Russia for her brutality.   In Jugoslavia oar soldiers are fighting for Tito while England is supporting his enemy, King David. Badoglio, Italy, England, Russia and the United States are in a row. We have given Russia one-third of the Italian navy and England won't stand for it. England ..is our closest and clearest friend of. hbng standing yet we are about to constructs pipeline across Arafiian territory over which England has r. mandate.   Favors to the Arabs are repungant to the Jews. ' y ; F. D. R. appointed Eleanor's uncle, David Gray, as United States minister to Ireland and officials circles say the whole row between Ireland and the United States is caused by this man who has no experience and no ability-but he is Eleanor's relatives.   Churchill is on a pout because the "schoolma'ains" want too much money and we sure have the "rollers" under Roosevelt.   South America is seething with discontentment, in fait I con*t know of one nation with whom we are friendly today. In India (England's colony) we don't know what side to take.  When I was in Calcutta there was a local war.   Ghandi's people were taking pans of ocean water, lettiYig the water evaporate, having the salt for their own use.  England had sold the salt to an English syndicate and there came the row.   Are we to take the native's side and "let them have the salt water" or are we to fight England?'  Incidentally, new questions have arisen in India.   The Japs are coming in from the east. (Look at your map.)   I covered India from Calcutta to Benares and from Bombay to New Delhi "and found the richest and poorest people in the world. India is governed by Maharajas who own vast estate*, stores, hotels, street cars, in fact the people, plus 300 million "sacred cows."  I went- in many jewelry stores that had three to five million dollars' worth of jewels.  Henry Ford's and Rockefeller's money would make only pocket change for a Maharaja.   All this will fall as easy prey to Japan which will make Japan the richer^ nation in the .world.. Notwithstanding all this, we are in this war. No nations on earth are more cruel than Japan and Germany and we have to fight it out.   We have to support our soldiers i'n the field, we have to help take care of them when they come home but I call all the above REAL FOREIGN ENTANGLEMENTS. What do you call it? drafted into the armed forces. Cpl. John Williams has been promoted to Sergeant at Pueblo, Colo., where he is stationed. Mr. and Mrs. Hans Petersen and son, Stanley, were dinner guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs Claude in Sioux City, Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Ardon Jones and family of .Sioux City visited Mr. and Mrs. Frank Vondrak and family Sunday. Mrs. Guy Gittina enjoyed' a visit from her sister, Mrs. Lloyd John-, son of Denver, Colo., Monday. Mrs. Agnes D. Nash spent the weekend with her sister, Mrs. Arthur Gabel and family near Akron. Fay Knapp and David Swanson had hogs on the Sioux City market Wednesday.  ******#**� * Political Announcement * Scholer For Sheriff Editor Globe-Post: Please ar. nounce that I will be a candidate for the nomination for sheriff on the democratic ticket in the June primary. The support of my friends wiil be appreciated. Frank Scholer. Union Cub Editor, Joan Sheehan; assistant editor, Lorraine Nugent;1 reporters, Lois Klingbeil, Bonnie Bolton, Evelyn Hansen. studying electricity. English 10 are working on newspaper reports and getting an idea of how to write a newspaper story. They hope to make a school paper in the near future. English 11 are beginning to read Julius Caesar. Social problems class'have been studying- the religions of the world. Grades 1 and 2 Russell Eyres brought candy.for all of us on Friday. His birthday is on Saturday. We wish 'him a happy birthday. Doris wrote a poem about Hitler The Home Ec. girls have finished I that we think is gool: "Hi'tler was their aprons and are-^continuing, crying, when he said, We're not gfr work on their pajamas:^ They are j ing to win the war. Tears rolled studying textiles and color as their down his cheeks And dn the floor!" catwork.     ' -. The "A" reading class in the Typing class have been doing | first grade wilhbegin "I Know A . nrogression typing. This has to i Secret" on Monday. "B" class be done without errors. They have j wil lstart "Elson Basic Book I." been doing quite well.   They are.    We have $3 for defense stamps this week. Carol,   Donna,   Sylvia,,   Junior, William, Janice and Doris; received 100% in spelling this wedk. The-x,j received a gold star in their spelling books. We are happy to welcome Gail Case into our room. She comes from Cherokee county. We hope she enjoys school with us. going to start their typing project which is writing personal letters and addressing envelopes. Manual Training boys are making ball bats, and ,typing tables. Some of them are oiling their tables already. Algebra 9, are working on equations with fractions. The English 9 class are writing paragraphs and giving oral reports. They are learning how to develop the topic sentences. General   science   students   are WHEN A MAN likes his work, he thinks about it. And the more he thinks about it, the more likely he is to have a good idea for improving methods. That's the way Illinois Central people are. During 1943 they submitted 26,103 suggestions. Of these, 4,651 have been adopted, with cash awards made. If you travel or ship by Illinois Central, these figures are significant to you. They show that to these "home folks" railroading is not merely a job. It is a career. And their attitude is reflected in their service to you. It is reflected, too, in their faithful performance of essential wartime duties. For railroad workers are war workers. Our country's future depends on moving millions of men and millions of tons of freight--fast! No war work is more important. And, today, many more competent workers are needed to carry on in a variety of essential railroad jobs. We are counting on our "home folks" to help meet thisemergencyastheyhavesomanyothers. Until the war is won, our main concern is victory. Afterwards,all our workers have learned in the war years will be turned to account in improving Illinois Central service. We want \o keep on earning your good will! PRESIDENT Grades 5 and G Wayne Case is a new' pupil in our room. We hope he likes it here. We now have 26 pupils in our room. Most of thi's week will be spent in review and tests over the past six weeks. Those who received 100% in spelling la.'jt Friday were: Mary, Everett, Patty, Junior, Harold, Gerald, Mary Anne, Daniel, and Paul. Beverly, Gene, Covinc, Lovna, Barbara and Marjnrio hive been absent with the mumps. Wc hope tbey will soon be back. Grades 7 and 8 The pupils of this room with 100%- in spelling are Marilyn, Hilda, Cherry, John and Joan. Our room has chosen two more spelling contestants for the contest. They are Phyllis Bleil and Bonnie Milton. Marilyn Dorr, one of our contestants has the mumps and will be unable to take part. We are very sorry. The mumps and pink eye are beginning their rout in our' room.     \ This week is six weeks test. It's the same story. Wc forget too easy. Last week in music we learned songs about Easter. RED CROSS NEWS I I IIN O1S E NTRA L    SYSTEM Emma Baack, chairman. Her work-era were as follows: August Lud-wig, E. H. Schulz, H. J. Ludwigs, John Schmidt, Mrs. Mildred Gal-land, D. W. Elliott. Contributors are as follows: $10-Craig Lumber Co, $8-August Ludwi'g. $7.DO-Security Savings Bank. $6-H. J. Ludwigs. ?5-V. E. Morey, Elevator, F. H. Voelker, Pauline Ludwigs, E. H. Schulz, G. W. Popken, S. Henry Fett, J. B. Peebles. $4-D. W. Elliott. John Schmidt. $3.50-F. H. Oloff. $3.25-Emma P. Baack. $3-H. G. Eilers, R. S. Westcott, Chas. Johnson. $2-H. F. Baack, Vernen Ludwigs, Eilbe? Ludwigs, Verna L. Hartman, Ed Schuette. $1.50-Walter Baack. $1-Hilbert Albright, J. G. Pop-ken, Mrs. Jensen, Herman Baack, Wm. Clark, Gladys Clark, Ernest Schuette, Carl Pegeler, Louis Eilers, Albert Eilers, Naomi Schmidt, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Luschen, Lyle Galland, Mrs. Lyle Galland, Louts and Billy Wendt, Mrs.. H. G. Eil lers, Josephine Schmidt, Loraine Asselm, M. J. Elliott, Mrs. M. J Elliott, Herman Eggebrecht, Amos Croon, Rose Croon, Herman Croon Emma Croon, Verna Croon, Alfred Hartman, Helen Hartman Eilerd Ludwigs, Agnes Ludwigs, H. F.'Ludwig, Annaleen Ludwig, Mildred Ludwigs, Minnie Pieper Gerd Pagelar, Johana Pagelar, Mrs. Lowell Marbach, John Popken, Mrs. Arlene Dirks, Clara Hutton, Edna Klave. Under $1-A. F. Winterfeld, Dick Eilers, Marie Beitelspacher.  Town of Struble-$146,50, . Re; ginia Garding and Jeanette Gybert-sen, chairmen. The following contributors are listed: $10-John Gybertsen, Mike Lang, Zenos Osborne. $6-John Garding, Reginia Garding, Howard Ohm, Jeanette Gybertsen. $5-Rev, Joseph Wolf, John Weriey, Mrs. Gybertsen, Nick Block, V. J. Lewis, Harold W. Ostrund, William Weriey, Leland Dobbert, Chas. Lang, Farmers Elevator, Gerd Ludwigs, Roy Lang, George Null, Roy Hauser, Jurgen Harms, Bruno Brunken, Paul Trigg. $3-pete Wilhelmi. $2-Roy Long. $1-Ralph H. Hinde, Ben Pecks. Under $1-Frank Wilhelmi. College News The personnel of the board of trustees of Western Union college will include more than one-third new members this year. Two new church area conference will be represented, these are the Montana and thq combined Washington-Oregon areas, the representatives of these will be Rev. Lyle Willard from Seattle, Wash., representing Oregon-Washington, and Rev. R. R. Strutz from Billings, representing Montana. Bishop E. W. Prae-toriu'i from St. Paul will presi'de as president of the board and Rev. H. E. Hiller from Blue Earth, Minn., will again act as secretary of proceedings. Although the regular college students will have several days of recess during Easter, the aviation classes will continue on regular �tchedule without interruption. The college classes closed Thursday noon and will again begin Monday noon. Dr. A. R. Hershberger left for Canton, Ohio Wednesday evening to visit his mother who has been in poor health. His son, Jimmie, went along to visit his grandmother.   They will return Monday. PERRYCENTER (By Special Correspondent) Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Lindlief arrived here Friday afternoon from Storm Lake where they visited his parents the past few weeks. Mr. Lindlief left Monday for Des Moines for service in the U. S. army. Mrs. Lindlief will make her home here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Kovarna. Mrs. Jerry Sloan was taken to a Sioux City hospital last Monday. The Perry Center pupils and teacher enjoyed a half holiday Monday afternoon because of a trustee meeting in the school house. Farmers here on the dirt roads have been out dragging them as they dry. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Swanson, Mrs. Will Bergman and John Udell of Sioux City spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Crouch. The Perry Friendship club will meet in the home of Mrs. Leo. Graham Thursday afternoon, Apr. 13. A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Francis Vondrak in Sioux City, Monday, April 3. Raymond JackBon of Sioux Cit> a former resident here, baa bee.,. The growing breach between the President and Congress, according to Democratic Senator Edwm Johnson of Colorado, has become so critical that it overshadows all other issues in the coming campaign. Unless the candidates for the presidency-all of them-assure the people that they will provide not only leadership, but are willing to cooperate with and respect Congress as .a coordinate branch of government, the "voters must reject them in the name of survived. The consequences of further conflict in the government," he says, "are too awful to contemplate." In England, the executive and legislative branches have to cooperate, because the House of Commons can compel it. When the Prime Minister loses a vote of confidence he has to resign. We have no such remedy here.  But Senator Johnson says that any President who wishes to cooperate and not dominate could put all executive functions under responsible cabinet heads, and instruct them to appear before Congress when requested and give ah accounting, as is done in the British House of Commons. The President could invite Congress to take a vote, of confidence on any important matter, and if the government lost, the responsible cabinet members would be required by him to resign. This, Senator Johnson says, would probably result in three or four changes in the cabinet right now, and it would put the others on their toes. "The departments would be revitalised, duplication would cease, and jurisdictional quibbling would end. Instead of chaos and confusion, responsibility and order would prevail in Washington." Senator Johnson says we are not at the crossroad, hut have long since passed it. The question next November is whether we will retrace our steps or continue down the wrong road to one-man rule. While Congress could not constitutionally require the President to discharge a cabinet head, nevertheless the Senator's suggestion is within the spirit of the Constitution, requiring only a President intent on preserving it. With respect to legislation, the president has only the following functions: 1. "To give to the Congress information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient"; 2. To call Congress in ."pe-cial Session; 3. To veto bills which he thinks objectionable, and 4 To "Take Care that the Lr.ws be faithfully executed." In Congress, however, is vested "all legislative Powers" granted by the Constitution. It is not the buviness of the President to bribe, purge, insult, or by-pass Congress. Congress is the constitutional hoard of directors of the people, elected hy them to lay down policies for (he President to carry out energy to producing Miu) selling goods, and making out government reports, they are going to spend time studying the system ,itsieli under which goods are mad* ana sold. They know the systemha's got to be improved. With its able manager, Leonard E. Read, acting as spark plug, the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce is leading thrs movement. If, business men generally realize' its importance it could become of nationwide significance. The United States Chamtier of Commerce with Eric Johnston as its president, is looking for the beam in the eye of business. Industrial statesmen are multiplying. Many wlil be startled when they hear Chamber of Commerce members talk about "Chamber of Commerce SoetalUnK." Bkit the talk is a fact.   Too many business men, who cuss socialism, actually promote It. They want free enterprise for themselves but clamor for government handouts to promote socialism In transportation elect-lc power, government credit, etc. The Los Angeles Chamber has gotten out a book entitled "Do We Want Free Enterprise "  Its 160 pages are chuck full of facts and figures.   It is a gold mine that costs only fifty cents. Get a copy, It puts in print what these study groups have been learning from a sound economist, V. O. Watts;? The best thing about these discussions is that labor leaders, minr' isters, .teachers, public officials; etc., are invited to attend. At Olym-j pia, Washington, last summer such" a group met for luncheon every day for three weeks. Business men were told what the faults of free enterprise were and what they must do to cure them." Labor rep-; resentatives testified that the meetings were, particularly help-] ful in giving both capital and labor a better understanding of each other's problems. These lectures expose the folly of business men throwing . other business men to the socialistic wolves; they  show that wealth is becoming more diffused, rather than concentrated, that capital and labor are, In fact, partners, not foes. Respecting the outcry against "vested interests,"  and  "human rights  before  property  rights," they show that a man's right, to change jobs is "vested"; that property has no rights, but only human beings have rights in  property whether it is a movie ticket, or a contract to buy a home. They show that production of new wealth, in greater quantity,, better quality, and lower price, cures most economic and social ills.   As the cost of living goes down, the standard of living goes j up.  Rather than strike 'for short- I er hours, workers should agitate i for   more   efficient   production. Everybody .should oppose taxes, monopoly, featherbedding and government competition which throt (tle production, and rai'se prices. Every'poimy-thiit helps- business-sell most and best for least, helps every worker, both as a producer and as a consumer. The lower the cost, the more consumed, and the more jobs. When businessmen or bricklayers deliberately lay fewer bricks or hold up prices, the demand for bricklayers and business men declines. If every business man, stockholder and worker would do what they are doing in Los Angeles, Olympia, and elsewhere we would look forward to better feeling and better '.times in post-war America.    . MONDAY, AWuVj Mearly 600 igi ception fafo,t Pupils andfl Nearly six hundred adults representing tvi-*-- -----  the high school bullEl evening as the guest* ofL of education and faculty1! caslon of.the. Mthraniuwl patrons' reception 1 of thill public schools.  Included?! groups were nearly �n ^ schools' two hundred. ujity3 and their parents and yostf� older brothers and sisters,^  The evening's enterfeii^l divided into two general tijjS first consisting of a .w musical &nd dramatiVma presented in the high sch tormium and the second om of sound movies, tour of tl�| Ihg and refreshments, second part of the festWft guests were divided tnto'4 groups of approximately M dred' each which alternate activities making up this the evening's entertains After being met. at /the Jl by. members of theboatdotij tion and faculty and heM a lapel emblem of an airplq sign, the guests assembled I auditorium where they list� a thirty-minute concert by till school band directed by 1 Bryant.  Following, the .cms brief address of welcome by Stipt. Harvey N. KltiiM who then introduced Priud^ taert Adams who presided us man for the remainder of to gram which consisted of ani skit entitled "Modern Vert| Cinderella" by the senior i training girls under the &, of Elma Zenk, a group of iw by the members of the mm partment and a one-act. p play entitled "I pledge Alls, by a group of tuition stiiden. der the direction of EdytheO Paticlpating in the normali ing skit were the following j most of whom are tuition si Dorothy Horton, Phyllis.. LaVonne Haack, Margaret ( Berni'ce Ohlrichs, Juar.Ua 1 Shirley Vanderham, and Brunken. Horsecollars Seem Haberdashery to OP A Washington, D. C-The office of price administration was challenged Friday by Rep. Boren (D., Okla.) to prove that human beings are wearing horse collars. It also was warned by Rep. Landis (R.. Ind.) that its price fixing policies would cause food to rot in the fields this summer. The horse collars and the food rotti.ig were discussed by the congressmen i'n separate statements issued from Canitol hill assailing the government's price control administration. "When did harness become apparel?", asked Boren in commenting upon an OP A price reg-' illation governing horse collars, lie said the regulation was based on a directive by Economic Stabilization Director Vinson which sets a 2 per cent profit celling on the production of textiles and clothing. Houses; Congress is kept in the iternational commitments vast funds in the postwar years, and it has heard threats that if it does not enact legislation by a certain date, the President will write it himself. The result is that loyalty to constitutional principles has forced a congress of the President's own party to revolt. As Senator Johnson courageously says, "If a President becomes irked at Congress and holds it in contempt, you may be sure he holds the people in contempt also." BUSINESS WAKING UP By Samuel B. Peilenaill A remarkable thing is happening. Business men, here and there, have decided that they don't know everything about economics. Instead of devoting all of their Boren said he had been, assured by Vinson that the profit ceiling would apply only to consumer goods which would be manufactured under mandatory war produc-, tion board programs to replenish denleted stocks of low priced lines. "If the directive is to be limited j to textiles and apparel, why has i it been applied to an item like \ horse collars?" Boren asked. "They are not textiles." Boren said manufacturers are becoming apprehensive that OPA may decide to extend the 2 per cent profit limit from textiles and clothing to other items, having already applied the rule to horse collars. He said the profit restriction is arbitrary and "inconsistent with our system of free enterprise and reasonable profits." He indicated WPB may order other mandatory production programs for civilian goods, thus permitting the 2 per cent profit ceiling to be applied more widely. The warning that "thousands -of tons,4)f fruits and vegetables will rot in the fields" was made by Rep. Landis In criticizing what he described as OPA's short-sighted policy In not raising the prices on wooden contaln-er? to encourage adequate -container production. He said OPA will be responsible for the waste of food which, cannot be shipped because of the shirtage of containers.   He said even if OPA makes some price adjustments these would come too late to pack all of this year's crops. He predicted a deficiency of from 45 to 65 million contain*** *�'-year.        * Representing the music ment were Warren Stun played two baritone hom "Atlantic Zphyrs" and "Bit of   Scotland,"   accompanid Richard Schultz; Shirley " who sang two soprano solo. dian Love Call," and "SayV er for the Boys Over Then,* companied by her sister, ' Remer; and Arden Slebein, Taylor, Gene Becker and JimOj who presented three quartet hers, "Army Hymn, "Haul Joe" and "Good News." . The cast for the play, "II Allegiance," included the' ing, all of whom are rural Leonard Witt, Irene Miller, Fischer,' Gen*   Lauters, Schnepf, Harold Wiebke.i Brunken and Madonna Sc! ' Serving as group guida the chairmanship of Pria Clark in the tour of the k were the following facultj student   council  members:' Hammond, Clyde Johnson, Laux, Alene Meis, Curtis Hf Shirley Remer, LaVonne, Mary Ann.Weber. Assisting Adams with the sound movia' Paul Traufler and D?  Martha Kuebler. ;';<* Students assisting with thM ing were the following and sophomore homemaWnfl Cecelia  Geary, Florence W Jean Nu.s�baum, Margaret, ler, Edna Staab, Mary AnM Dorothy Bowers, Doris Granffl Glada Reichert, Rose MarjJ phy,   Kathleen   Keough, W Donin,   Alice   Welgers, AW Kloster, Leia Belle Coil, Moser, Dorothy Taylor, � Smith, Evelvn Downing, Kluckhohn, Mary Louise Betty   Lang,   Valjean Wi Ruth Meis, Buster. HerM� Herzig, Beryl Bamberg, Lna] Schuldt, "Juanice Behman.' Berkehpas,    Francella Elaine Thompson, Jean u� dorfer, Maxine Shearon, Mauer, Charlene Oltwanns,� Ewin, Joanne Simmons, �\ Wick, Mildred Matern, W*j mer, and Joanne Wright students helping with tw � ments   were   Venan W*% Bethel Fischer, and DoroOW er. Homemaking gl�,,s03 additional service were: Mildred,  and Francella � Other faculty members' dents serving on various cw tees included the following ropms:   Mabelle   Meal, 6 Carey,  Frances heUMT  Carol Dunn, Earl Wiebke, m -Herbert Adams, chajr�a% the OJson, Dorothy Bryant, Elma Zenk; roow�� ments, Martha Kuebler, cn^ Edith  Johnson,  M. �. dishes and  outside,'���& Wm. M. Wichelmanri, Edith Johnson; reception?'/ -Harvey N. Kluckhohn, ^ Herbert Adams; mlseelw^i ties-Joyce Cooper aiw " �n�;'ushers-Elnora l^wl garet  Geary,   ArtyO*^ Phyjli's Kloster, Dorothy vv Dprothy Horton. t Members and o^'f^ir board,of education aw,,V present at the reception'" Dr.t. C O'Toole, Geo.*' Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Ca� 
                            

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