Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

LeMars Evening Sentinel Newspaper Archive: February 14, 1885 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: LeMars Evening Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   LeMars Evening Sentinel (Newspaper) - February 14, 1885, Lemars, Iowa                                EVENING   SENTINEL. SUBSCRIPTION RATE IN ADVANCE, FIVE DOLLARa PER YEAR, 50 ClfiNTS   PER   MONTH. VOL.4 NO, 295. LE MARS, IOWA, SATURDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 14. 1885. IttJteM, Railroad Tim* Table. JLMNOIS CBNl'lU L. TKAIVS aOINO KA89. . 4:05 p. m. dally except Soturdar. 7:16 A. K. dally eioopt aundoy. 4:10 A. M. except Sunday. 6:3t P. v. except Sunday. nufflsoowoTTMr. . 9:� A.M.,dally exeopt Menday. -II      10:00 p.m., dally except Suaday. "�i^" . r^fI�M�.^e�x^�Sya^!'""^'^ C, St. p., M. A O. BA1LI104B. L8ATB LBMAIU OOIRO lOimi. gjl'Taa&ceptsi.n^^^^^ VftlJ" Monday....... 9:48 p. m Trjln Ne. IT runs between Sioux Olty ft Alton (a J PUM., rtaily.................... 1:36 a. m ^o.4,paM.,dally, except Sunday.....0:05 a m Train No. 19 runs from tfloux CaiV to* Alton HOYTS OPERA HOUSE TWO NIGHTS ONLY. looiay and Tuesday, Feb. 16 and 17. Special cntragemtnt of the Pejmlar EDWARD CLIFFORD OUAMATIO OONIPANY. tappeittnii the Qreataooioty Aotrew, CONSTANCE STANLEY, lathe Brest li-act play, entitled !iE GALLEY SLAVE! Hl98 Stttiiloy ae CleoUy BUlne, the Bollo of Farla. � JWARD CLIFFORD, at HIdnay Norost, the ArtlHt. Supported by It PlrsC Clasf Aotora. iaerved seata wltheut extra eharre at Biehl'idrug store. Mrs. Uenry Hart is quite sick. Lent begins next Wednesday. ;� Dave Edmunds left yesterday for Chicago, to be absent some days. ' P. M. Tomlinson has bought L. B. V Coons farm up near Ireton, paymcc $28 ' pet acre, Mm. S. Vauglin of .Marion township, islyineat the point of death with con-lamption. James Hopkins, Warren Gilbert and Jack Ilynes came in last night from 'Storm Lake. The German play was not given this afternoon but will be given this evening, at Hoyt's, Col, Emery estimates that at least . 8,000 valentines passed through the L�-Marsofflce to-day. Mr.T.C.Thomas.the young English I; evangelist, will hold a gospel meeting . wthe Y. M. C. A. rooms this evening, >t7;30. AH are invited. The flrst through mail for a week on I: the Central reached here last night.aud pve the postmaster and his clerks a busy day. There were over 8,000 letters �nd hundreds of pounds of newspapers �The Globe's threat to make a per-wnal warfare .against the Sbntinbl, ''"ajy talk, and shows the extremity ' that paper has been driven. �ffiUDgdogs are said not to do much The special meeting of the council I'm, Monday evening will appoint Inflges and clerks for the polling places in the coming* city election. Mayor Moore asks a general attendance ottepreseiitative men of this city. The New Orleans Times-Democrat contains a lengthy notice of the display M woman's work in the Iowa depart-' jent of the exposition, in which we ; Wamentionof Miss Viola Augir's iWenk album in the form of a palette. ^ Jibe Globe Bays we have made "anqny-; toons''attacks upon it. That word Is � by the Globe simply because it Mjinas dangerous and looks well in print The fact is there has been ; whlng anonymous about the Globe in i'iMoEirriNEL. Everybody says what ? ^� been said was plain talk and right J to the point.' 1 .The greatest novelty in a Sibley I Wlty store, says the Gazette, is a I clock with a rotary pendulum, wbiob I ftovfs that the people up there ate ��y.pleased. Sunpose^ {Wly �ovel or modern should strike lu&t town, what would become of the , wlkswhoare excited over a clock with jj notary pendulum. J Pr^testint gentleman who has , pwnBev. Father Mels for the past ;.Weai8,Bay8 he was surprised at the .: made upon him by the Wobe, he always having regarded him o� Oathollo siR' a'i^,ol1�d the fact that Father iWewtUy favored the voting of a I SJ.toi the State normal school, when 1; �Xe opi^oaltlon would no doubt llk'p^      commenced over at �ll'cCy tliAH^^ **' �8ain8t George SrtSntv l^**?!?"! treasurer of Donnenv' 'n^?    bondsmen, Pat-t > ffll7'oJ5''�c?.' Dennison, Leo-Sn? ^S^.v^'^ion Molnerney. ^ywCj"* o� the treasurer's bond ,�8tnSaC^* gEjatersum      all con-rX^M *12 oS)^�o'�*^V Jhe defalcation la o^sea iiT�Sf^**t�te attaches In " i�8kin.f      ppoent OP about GER!!! ANOTHER SENSATION I JuineH BoiiklnH ArrcHted  r(;iii|; Motoa while l*luylii|;aH Ilnnkurs. The pursuit of the fire bugs 1ms been prosecuted steadily ever since iLiZ pn^�JS*^ 1� "^^^^'"y Revere Housed and the burning of Plymouth mills Detectives have had the matter in hand and have gathered day by day the threads of guilt which seem to lead unmistakably to the controling instigator of the outrage which destroyed one j1- ^^i.�^t Iniportant industries and ifttiea to wipe out much other valuable property. The bottom is now out, and in due time every accomplice in the dastardly midnight work will come to an account... The information Hied by F. \V. Bums and G. W. Wilson with Justice Ailiae i\re published below and indicate that the matter is now in the hands of ^en who haye no com-irtomises to make, and who will give this community the service necessary to protect it against the basest of crimes. State of Iowa vs. James Hopkins. The defendant James Hopkins is accused of the crime of arson, committed as follows: For that on or about the 18th day of August, A. D. 1884. in the night time, in tlie township of America, inTlymouth county, Iowa, did unlawfully, willfully, maliciously and feloniously set Dre to and burn the inliabited building, to-wit: The lintel known as the Revere House, occupied by A. Brown, and owned by G. W. AVilson and A. Manahan, situated on lots 1,2 and 3, in sub-division of lots 1 and 2, in block 12, of the town of LeMars, in said township, county and state, that the said James Hopkins did set lire to said building as aforesaid, with the intent then and there to burn said building. That by reason of the premises a portion of said hotel was destroyed by said fire,contrary to the statute in such cases made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the state of Iowa. G.W. Wilson. Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1885, by the said G. W. Wilson. A. A. Alline, Justice of the Peace. The other two charges are similar to the above except that in one July 2oth, 1884, is substituted for the lirst attempt to burn the Revere House, also signed by G. W. Wilson, while the other is signed by Frank W. Burns and charges Hopkins with setting fire to the Plym-outu Roller-Mills, on the night of June 22,1884. Sheriff Haerling went to Cherokee yesterday to arrest Mr. Hopkins. At that place the sheriff learned that he was going home by first train. On this account the arrest was not made until this morning, which saved tlie oflicer the extra expense home and the keeping of the prisoner over night. Quite a sensatioij prevailed when the word passed rapidly through the city following the arrest. The attorneys for the prosecution are Messrs. Struble, Rishel & Sartori, of this city, and Messrs. Clark & Erwin, of Fort Dodge. The defense is of course Messrs. Argo, Kelly & Augir. The senior member of this firm will now have enough to do to defend his political associate without manipulating the coming city election. The attorneys for the prosecution have in hand not only the task of weaving the network of evidence around the fire bugs, but also that of applying the law to the bank wreckers for all there is in it. Mr. Erwin, of Fort I)odge,iia8 filed the following information witli Justice Alline and the parties named are now busily hunting bondm the sum of $4,000, or $1,000 n each e^wge. tonkins f furnish $3,500 and Kelley $500. They waive examllation asd the cases go the grand jury. State of Iowa vs. James Hopkins and Se above-named defendants are accused of the crime of forBory, committed as follows: For that the said James Hopkins and Matt B. Kelley did, on or about the 10th day of September, A. D^ 1884, at the township of America, Plymouth county, state of Iowa, unlawfully and feloniously forge and couXrfeft a certain Prom f �ry no^^^^^ and did then andJhere.,wRh the intent ** �� *s ..,.1 TlMrtiifti marked "Exhibit A" and mauo of this information,) contrary to the statute in such cases made and provided. B. A. Biivm. Subscribed and sworn to before me by the said li. A. Ervin, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1885. A. A. Allikb, Justice of the Peace. A Card. Tn tlie PM&?tc;-Once more, throue"} Ileal lar- aoteriaesouri^rt il^n^S'^Snse � i tWnkt^^^^^^ residence own aerense.   A vHtuft entitles iStlt       tlVcSon courtesy. ihe charges laid at mv door are un-tounded and too tpreposterously silly lor even comment; nevertbeles.i, lam quite prepared to meet them, and have not the slightest hesitation in assuring niy friends a complete and thorough vindication. Por the present my cases are all removed to a court of record-away from prejudiced and time-serving magistrates.and where I will conliont my accusers be-ore a court wliere I can liiive a fair hearing. In. itH present diatribe the state (or nilluT. the malignant, self-appointed uycnb oi the state) has just about as much iciil evidence against me as it has agfimsl a soldier in the British army. . Will the people do me the common justice to wait until I blow this whole conspinujy clear out of the waterV If 1 caiiiuit show it to be the yilest con spiracyever concocted in the state of Iowa, then I am willing to suffer each and all of the penalties. � Yours truly, , James Hopkins. LeMaiis, Feu. 14,1885. A Kularn .Shot. The Sentinel has nothing personaljl against tlie (ilobe folks. In the line ofil Its duty to the public, it is simply^ pushing its contemporary to define Itsi position as the apologist and champioitl of bummerisra and worse, or the advocate of honesty in office and decency in public. When that paper professed to unload Hopkins and Kelley to save its life, it did only a selfish act, and was not entitled, to credit. If it does not still retain in its proprietorship professional gamblers and ballot box conspirators and is not inspired by this e ement let it drop that championship, and advocate better things. In its last issue it says: "Now Mr. SENTiNEt, shall wo hav-o a fair and candid dlsuuaslon o� our dlirerciices or shall we have a peieonal warfare? Wo prefer tho foriiior, but if compelled to cuter into the light we Bhull bo tho liiat to leave It. Wo know ynui vulnerable polutfl, and If we meet wdl dieaoct them, if you and your proniiiters compel us to resort to this knul of Jounuallsm to defend ourselves and friends from your cowardly and anonymous assaults." We have heard that kind of threats and attempts at bluffing for years. Kernan howled it, and Buck repealed the dismal refrain, and now their sickly imitators take up the echo. The gang has repeatedly sent special commissioners to notify us in a confidential way, that a detective was running down the pathway of our life with the thirst of a bloodhound seeking for "vulnerable points," and that we iiad better stand from under, it is our pleasure and our pride to declare that tho record is an open book, and the character a bulwark tht.t has ever challenged assault. So if the Globe desires to defend itself and "friends" it is at liberty to select its own weapons. Its reference to "friends" is one we did not expect it to have the frankness to admit, because as we have referred to no one except gamblers, bank wreckers and ballot box stullers. The Globe cannot refer to anyone as its "friends" in this connection except the class last named. E. \V. Skinner,secrotary of the Sl�ux City board of trade received a telegram yesterday from Congressman Struble briefly announcing that the house had passed the bill reviving the franchise of the Sioux City branch of the Union Pacific. The amendment mentioned provides tliat the proposed road shall cross the Missouri at Sioux City. The Journal says the tlianks of Sioux City people are due our representative, not only tor the efficient way in which he has worked for this most important measure, but as well for so promptly sending information when the measure passed. The friends of the bill in Washington have all along said that if the measure could be brought to a vote it would pass the house. How difficult it has been to get the vote only those who have worked in the interest of the measure know. Here in Sioux Citv tho repeated failures of tlie attempt to get a vote had discouraged all but a few. In tne senate it is confidently believed by tnose best in condition to know, the bill will be passed the present session. It will not have there as in the house, the obstructive rules which has made it next to impossible to reach a vote.      _ As inclement as tlie weather was yesterday a large crowd attended Mr. Van Pelt's great reduction on the sale of cloaks, blankets, broche shawls, velvets, dress goods and other soecialtles for which his popular store is noted. Many who have the means are buying for future need as it is doubtful if goods of equal merit will ever be sold in this city again at what other dealers call "ruinous prices." Mr. Van Pelt intends to turn as much as possible of his large stock into good old-fashioned cash before starting east for sprinc' goods and he informs our reporter that he will continue this sale several days longer in order to stuff out his pocket-book before visiting the panicky markets of the east. "He buys for cash and sells for cash only," hence all these choice bai'gains that are so seldom found elsewhere,_____ Kemsou Nowa. Feb. 13.-Dealers all out of coal, but cobs save us from freezing up, so we are all happy yet..,.The masquerade ball at the Blake house was a success All of the gentlemen present masked and many of the ladies. The club cleared $18... .The telephone wire was broken for a while between here and LeMars, but has been repaired. With trains stopped, coal out and the telephone line down left us rather Isolated Kansas City Times: The neighbor-ing state of Iowa has been capturing a few gold medals at the World's exposition for creamery butter and other toe arts. Missouri is quietly waiting for the arrowhead head sweepstakes and the award on Indian skulls. Any commonwealth can make butter and grow apples, but It takes a superior uualitv of soil to turnout asliuUIn good state of preservation.       / Geo. Ilodam has 800 sheep fpr The Niobrara ReHorvntion Open to Sottlo-inont. The President has by executive order opened to public settlement, after May 15,1885, all lands within the Niobrara, or Santee Sioux reservation in Nebraska, remaining imalloted to and uuse-lected by Indians, except such as are occupied for agencyL^school and missionary purposes. The Journal says these lands comprise many thousands of acres of the richest agricultural and best timber land in the state of Nebraska. The reservation lies along tho Missouri river, at a point below the confluence of the Niobrara, and is only distant from Sioux City about eighty miles, and is immediately accessible by railway. There being no doubt entertained of the repeal of the pre-emption and timber culture act, these lands will deubtlessonly be subject to entry under the homestead act, and will therefore give opportunities to about twice as many settlers as the same extent of territory would under the old regime of speculative pre-emption and timber culture entries. However, the lands being among the richest in the whole north-west with railway facilities already at the door of the settler, the rush that Avill come with the montli of May will soon cover the last available acre. From Town to Town. The other day we quoted a correspondent's account of a family reaching Wakefield, Neb., claiming tliat they had been sent from LeMars to that place. The Wakefield Republican has come to hand with further particulars. The party consists of two women and five cliildren strikingly systematical in gradation, the whole company being possessed of an equatorial complexion. The older of the grown women reported herself as the grandmother, while tlie children were claimed to belong to the other, her daughter. They gave tneiv name as Dahurl, and both husbands dead. While on the road to Pone a on Friday, the seven-year old boy, while under the influence of a cliunk of candy, in answer to tho question where they lived, said, "on the cars," and further that ho never saw his father, and that tho older boy w.is not his brother, and that the younger of the grown women was not his mother. The older boy, about eleven, la reply to incidental interrogations, said the older of the women was his mother, and that his father died three years ago, and that only theoldestof the girls was his sister. Such conflicting reports from the different members give grounds for the belief that they are traveling from town to town, and imposing to no small extent upon the people. How Boyd Leedom, the democratic editor of Ponca, to whom they had been referred by LeMars parties, received them the Republican knows not. Curd of ThnnU.4. Editor Sentinel: We desire through the medium of your paper to express our heartfelt thanks to friends for their many kind and sympathizing ministrations in the great aflliction and liereavo-ment through which we have recently been called to pass by the illness and death of our little Florence. J. H. Stuuhle. Mas. J. H. Stuuiii.e. Detroit Free Press: Many voungraen are always very ready to accept invitations to other people's home circles. They are very much more attentive to other people'ssistars than to thoir own! A young man should be found in his home, and spend sufficient time there for his influence to tell upon tho family and for him to cultivate manly dispositions that will be a blessing in years to come. Buy your hard coal before another bllzzaru comes. TOWNSHND & PeNIIALLEQON. Musin, Instruction on organ or piano given by Mrs, C. II. Jones, residence on Washington street near the corner of Second street. "Itouek^n I'nin." Cures colic, cramps diarrhcoa: externally for aches, pa ns, sprains, iioad-aclie, neuralgia, rheumatism. For man or beast. 20 and 60c. That tnkelh not a back seat for compbtition though it eome Irltil (he OQBttlkljf horns of deceit or the brazen cheek of the unmitigarod prevarieatoiB. Bot v0flB~ say to tho people SEARCHYE For THAT WHICHis 6001 Wlio hath woe? Who hath conteiitiony Who getteUi up in the middle of thel night and goeth after tlio doctor for the youngest boy who snlTereth much from the croup because of his shoddy overcoat? Who hath rheumatism in his joints till ho can scarcely navigate for want of heavy llannels!' Who diveth down deep into the basement of his pocket for a nickel andfiud-eth it noty He who tarryeth long ovw the (called "half-priced" �oanten �t Ott: Israelite dealers, and spendeth his MIW. stance for shoddy coverinKi aad Jaliu eth not the innumerable oanm wld� journeyeth to the U. S., when ttti hearts of good men ate made glat Iff Che cheapness which prevaietli fttt, : classes of clothing, nottons and Mk Where the long-suffering U.S. ittt. smileth a deep smole as he wat(di�i tlM^ success of his efforts to make ttie tJV ff? the most popular store In Lelfaxt^ He who readeth this lesson 9x0. ai^ [eth not his son or brother to (heitf. & for a supply of underwear er gtevee tim. same is a fooMsh man and Idt 104 needeth flxhi. Tho cold weatlior makes people scratch around after warm clothe*. AH wm ask is for you to look our slock over, and if not able to make Batlsfacterv MiS* we shall not expect you to buy. ' OSITI? J Y^^*^ ^^^^^ not-allow any con-' IlL I corn to UNDEllSELL US. pflsimi Respoctfiill}^ Yours, H. F. DOW.' Pa*oi�rletoi* ol the U. $!. Clothinff HoQ8e� ATni/jt'iioKoa hi a novol word to most imoiilo who in>cttk tho EnKllBli lanirungo. Tho tiruolia used It couturlcH atfo. xuoanlujf by it "TUB I'UIZE-UEAUKU." Atiilopjiokos la tho llrBt and only mcdicino wliich has carried off tho prizo as tho perfect remedy for liheu-matism and Neuralgia. Ltko two rolontlcBS tyrants they bare tot Bgca hold tliolr nufforlnif vlctlmB In an Iron KTlp. Thoso i)Oor Bulloiora havo boon as elavos In tho power of Uiob opprosBors. ATHLOPnoKOs Irna entered the arena, engaged in oonfllat with tho morwlon), and won Ihu _ victory. Ah tho comi>oUtors in thu Oroclou gamoH of old could wlu only by tho moat sovoro trlulH of ability and endurance, bo Atuloi-uoboh boA won tho prlzo, not alono by ifivlng temporary rollof, but by bringliiif an endurluif euro, aa well, to thOHo who havo BulTorod tho excruclatlui; ugouloa of Bliouiuo. tiam and NoorolKla. ATUXornoBOS is a novelty, not only In namo, but in its elements. It ia unlike any preparation yet introduced. ATniX)PU0B08 acta on tho blood, muaolos and Jolnta, removlntf tho poison and aold from tho blood, carrloH thorn out of the eyatem. AniLOFnoitoB la put up with consununato nklll. and contalna uothlnpr Uiat con pOBalbly harm tho moat dolioato conntltuUou. Now, do you want to suffer on and ml or do yon want to bo woU 1 "Athlophoros" WILL Cure You If you oannat got Atolophobos of your druff-glst, we wUl sond It exprofla paid, on rocolpt of regular prloo-one doUar per tottle. Wo prefer that you buy It from your druggliit, but If ho linsn't It, do not bo porsuuded to try BoraotUlng Ohio, but order at onco trout ua as directed. ATHLOPHOROS CO., 112 WALL ST., NEW YORK. lllimillllllBfllllf I Hi Hi ItllHIHllllllllllllll Attorneys. r|^0WMS�nd m.  ZIKK, JL Counsellor at liBW, Wi courts of tho State." Offlbo book, opposite Post Office. Bee In RlebnuBT* DB. O. W. FOSTBB, PhriteiM tnd Omoo over First Natton�lB 1 ST�UBI.B,n Boys nnd Co__ niook above P. 0. .BISHEI. AND �AB�OBI.At(� '^unselors at Law. ofloe ia Bm AH. I.AWBBNOB, Attorney at Law. M�  flee above Hart & Co.'a vroMrf. Ux� street. M. HILGERT 8UCOE8BOU TO IKAIBBR. MnnufHOturer efaPdahloaablt Dress BootsShoes and Eaners KAISBR'B BLOCK. Best of Custom Work done ts eidatv palrlnir promptly and neatly d�a�. NOTICE! NOTICE! GREAT BiMWT BAN EUPT SALE F We have Bought at Foreclosure Sale the lOntire 8tock of Israel Brothers' (Jlothing House, consisting of , -j- Mensjouth's Boy's & Children's Clothing BOOTS and SHOES,HATS, GAPS, Trunks, Yalises and Gent's Furnishing Goods which will Closed out at Fifty Cents on the Dollar.  All Goods to be S�l<| at ON^E-HALF Former Trices. mm m mm   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication