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Le Mars Semi Weekly Sentinel Newspaper Archive: February 10, 1891 - Page 1

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Publication: Le Mars Semi Weekly Sentinel

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   Le Mars Semi-Weekly Sentinel (Newspaper) - February 10, 1891, Lemars, Iowa                                 VOL. XXJ. . LEMARS, IOWA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, LSSUKD 8HJM1- WEEKLY Trans- Mississippi Commercial Congress at Galvestoh. • IJSS AND JEFFERSON DAVIS. ECONOMIC QUESTIONS IN ORDER. The Sense of the Gathering Shown in the Resolutions Adopted— The Irrigation Conference at Sidney, Neb., and the Needs of Western Nebraska. GALVESTON, Tex., Feb. 9.— The report of the committee on resolutions of the inter- state congress provides that the congress shall be styled " the trans- Mississippi Commercial congress" and states that the sole purpose of the convention, and that to be called by- it, shall be the consideration of economic questions only. It urges upon congress to provide by adequate appropriations for the completion of the work on the deep water harbor at Galveston as speedily as possible without interruption; favors free and unlimited coinage of silver;, favors the immediate opening of Indian reservations in Oklahoma and elsewhere, to the end that the vast areas of land now appropriated to no useful purpose may be added to the productive sections of the nation. The action of the government as to reciprocity with Brazil meets the enthusiastic approval of the convention, and it is hoped the movement will be extended until it embraces the whole of South and Central America and Mexico. The report favors the granting of national charters to corporations running American vessels in foreign trade, and declares that the basis of representation for future sessions of this congress shall be: Thirty delegates- at- large from each state and territory, to be appointed by the county commissioners; one delegate from each city and one additional delegate for each 10,000 or fraction in excess of 10,000 of the population, to be appointed by the mayors; ten delegates from each board of" trade, chamber of commerce, or other commercial organization, to be selected by such bodies as they may elect; that all railroad com : parties operating west of the Mississippi river shall be entitled to two delegates each, and that they may be earnestly urged to be represented, to the end that a just understanding may be reached between the people and the great transportation lines of the west and southwest; that the boards of trade, chambers of commerce, exchanges, and commercial clubs, represented in this convention, shall be entitled to thirty votes, and that all other organizations of a progressive or commercial character here represented shall be entitled to ten votes, whether the delegations be fully represented or not; that the permanent organization effected at this session be continued Tintil the next meeting of this congress and that the permanent officers of this congress shall act as temporary officers of the next; that we recommend the appointment of D. C. Imboden of Galveston, Ryerson Ritchie of Kansas City, H. L. Pierce of Wichita, E. 0. Flood of Galvoston and the secretary of this convention as a committee to formulate and present at our next convention statistics relating to the commerce of the west and south- west.' The committee was unanimous on all the foregoing resolutions except the one relating to reciprocity, and upon that a minority report was presented but was rejected. Maj. E. W. Crane of Houston, then moved to amend the resolution relating to the free coinage of silver by adding the words " The product of the mines of the United States." After a short discussion it was adopted and the convention adjourned to meet in Denver, Colo., on May 19, 1891. IRRIGATION CONVENTION. The General Denies the Allegations Made by Davis' Widow. CHICAGO, Feb. 9.— In the memoirs of Jefferson Davis, recently published by his widow, many pages are devoted to a description of the " Tortures of Fortress Monroe," of which district Gen. Miles, now at the division of the Missouri, was in command at the time Davis was imprisoned there. Mrs. Davis charges Gen. Miles with cruelty to the ex- presiden of the Confederacy. He is charged with shackling Davis by brutal force, keeping him in a vermin- infested cell, withholding his clothes and linen and making souvenirs out of his possessions, even his hair, when he had it cut. Gen. Miles was interviewed in regard to the matter. He said he did not mind the attack. " Of course," he added, " Mrs. Davis feels bitter towards'me, as she probably does towards many more northern soldiers. While caring nothing at all for anything she may say or write, I would call your attention to the fact that Jefferson Davis managed to survive my cruel treatment and lived twenty years after, finally dying of old age. That would hardly have been the case, I think, if he had been subjected to such horrible abuses. There is not a particle of truth in the statements made by his wife. Ths fact is that Jeff Davis never was in better trim than when he was liberated." How Justice Is Meted Out to Delaware Offenders. A. SENSATIONAL IOWA ELOPEMENT STEHX WORKERS OUT. A Fatal Prize Fight at Seattle— Clever Work of a Forger— A Desperate Fight with Burglars — Big Reward for Assassins. Many Able Speakers Discuss the Subject at Sidney — Resolutions Adopted. SIDNEY, Neb., Feb. 9.— W. P. Miles called the irrigation convention to order at 2 o'clock. Mark M. Neeves was chosen chairman and Joseph Oberfclder and L. B. Carey secretaries. Chairman Neeves briefly stated the object of the convention. Speeches were made by Wrn. E. Smythe of Omaha, Judge Cochran, Maj. Lehew, W. E. Bobbins, Hon. Henry S. Baynor, B. H. Lawrence, Albert Frame, Joseph Heberl, reviewing the subject in all its phases. The following resolutions were adopted: Whereas, We are thoroughly convinced that the western half of Nebraska requires irrigation to assist its rich, and superb climate in producing successful agriculture; therefore be it Besolved, by this convention, representing the most remote western counties, that it hereby urges the legislature to speedily enact comprehensive irrigation laws of a similar character to those of Wyoming and Colorado and providing for the appointment of an expert state engineer and the division of the state into water districts. It is further Resolved, That we reiterate our faith in the grand future of this state and that we cordially invite the co- operation of both foreign and domestic , capital in its development. It is further Besolved, That we urge the legislature to memorialize congress in favor of the bill providing for the donation of the public lands to the several states. It is further Resolved, That we memorialize the legislature to make an appropriation to assist in the beginning of irrigation enterprises. The convention elected as its representatives to draft irrigation laws for presentation to the legislature, Messrs. Carey, Bayner and Smythe. Minnesota Democrats and the Farmers' Alliance to Join Forces. ST. PAUL, Minn., Feb. 9.— It is stated that the simultaneous presence here of the Democratic state organization committee of twenty- five and the executive committee of the State Farmers' Alliance is for no less a purpose than the complete fusion of the two parties, with Ignatius Donnelly, the Shakespearian iconoclast, for governor, Thomas Wilson for United States senator to succeed Cushman K. Davis, and in case the Alliance nominates a national ticket a division of the electors on the basis of four to the Alliance and five to the Democrats. The argument used is that the parties are agreed on t^ e tariff and silver- question, at least in vue state, and can win by fusion where they would fail utterly in fighting single handed. The vote in the state in November was: Republicans, 87,000; Democrats, 85,000, and Alliance, 58,000, giving a fusion - majority of over 60,000. i • Dying from Hiccough. NEW\ HAVEN, - Conn., Feb. 9.— Alice ', - JWboclwaraf a girl of about 10 years^ has beeir hiccoughing incessantly- for six Five Hundred Furnacemcn Quit Work and the Illinois Steel ^ Company's Fires Are Deserted. . sB CHICAGO, Feb. 9.— Five hundred furnacemen employed at the Illinois Steel company's works at South Chicago have quit, r. nd work at that plant, the greatest of its kind in the world, is practically at a standstill. The men asked an increase of 10 per cent, on wages. The* company replied by offering to increase the helping force 1 per cent, and wages at the same rate. This was refused. Superintendent Foote told the men he would blow out the furnaces in twentyfour hours unless they accepted his terms. He discharged a part of the employes of one furnace. The superintendent then threatened that no one who quit should again work for the company, but they aL. quit work on time and left the furnaces in good condition. The forty switchmen were laid off, as there vvasnoworK for them. The engineers and firemen followed and the great works are deserted. Want a Ship Canal. WALLA WALLA, Wash., Feb. 9.— The Columbia and Snake Biver Auxiliary Waterway convention, consisting of delegates from Washington, Oregon and Idaho, has adopted resolutions expressing belief that a ship railway, as recommended by the Oregon delegation in congress, is the most economical, satisfactory and expeditious plan for a permanent improvement of the dalles of the Columbia river. The memorial to the legislatures of Washington, Oregon and Idaho sets forth that financial distress prevails in the territory drained by the Columbia, on account of inability of the railroad companies tc move the grain crop at the proper time, and as a temporary relief urges the construction of a portage raihvd, y around the cascades and dalles, in order that tlje river may be made navigable to the inland empire. A World's Fair Appointment. CHICAGO, Feb. 9.— Director General Davis has received a number of letters urging the appointment of D. B. W. Raymond of New York, as chief of the department of mines and mining. Dr. Baymond is at present secretary of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, of which society he has twice been president. He is now in Europe and is unaware of the use of his name in this connection. Gold in North Dakota. AEVILLA, N. D., Feb. 9.— John Clernmer of Wheatfield has been drilling a well for Mrs. Miller, of the Aultman Mill company, on her big farm in the town of McKinock, one mile from Arvilla. After having passed his drill through cliiierent material he struck a vein that has been decided upon by local experts as a rich vein of gold. Everybody is wild/ Beal estate is changing hands freely in the neighborhood. WILMTNGTOM, Del., Feb. 9.— The majesty of Delaware justice was sustained " in the ram at Newcastle. Eleven men svere whipped by the sheriff. Two men rtood in the pillory for an hour— one an Did gray- haired man who had pleaded guilty to a petty forgery, and the other i negro who had been convicted of burglary and larceny. After the men had. been pilloried fifteen minutes they were dripping wet and chilled to the bones. The suffered much and kept shifting their weights from one leg to the other. Streams of water ran from their heads, heads hands and shoulders, and the old man's hands were blue with cold. When taken from the pillory the men were numb and they could scarcely move their hands and necks. The negro, Willey, was then hastened to the post and twenty lashes. were laid across his bare back. They caused him much pain, the flesh being cold. Then ' came the other ten victims, each in turn receiving rive lashes from Sheriff Simmons. The total value of goods stolen by these ten thieves, as set forth in the indictments, was $ 56. Each of the victims will now undergo an imprisonment of one or two months. The cost of supporting and trying these men, with a half dozen other cases of the same kind, in which the penalty of the lash was not imposed, will not fall short of .$ 1,000. Three judges sat on the bench to hear these cases, which were looked after by the attorney general, the clerk of the court, the, petit and grand juries, the sheriff and several other county officials. The grand jury, in its report, suggested that some steps be taken by the legislature to provide a means of disposing of such petty cases outside court. CORED BY THE A Consumptive Restored by Dr. Koch' » Remedy— Spurious tymph Causes Death. ST. Louis, Feb. 9.— W.- A. Walters, who entered the Missouri hospital Jan. 21 a consumptive, leaves cured. All the known tests fail to reveal the slightest trace of consumption or tuberculosis of the lungs, and, so far as medical experts are. able to ascertain, Koch's lymph has performed the wonderful cure. Wialters was a consumptive for more than a . year. .'..-."'- • i Spurious Lymph. .. KANSAS CITY, Feb. 9.— Was John B. Ells murdered? That is the question which Coroner Langsdale and an able corps of assistants endeavored to decide at a post- mortem examination of the body at Stine's morgue. Ells died at the city hospital from the effects of. an injection of what was said to, be Dr. Koch's lymph. There is a great deal pf interest taken in the case among the members of the medical . profession. There is a great deal of doubt as to the genuineness of the fluid " injected. The deceased wife is loud in her denuncition of Dr. Baum, who administered the lymph, and says that she and her family were ignorant of the experiment. The coroner is very skeptical on the subject of Dr. Koch's treatment and when- he learned of Ells' death he determin^ dJOiSat a thorough investigation and a postmortem examination should be made. •*- Long Sessions of the Are in Order. Senate A GENERAL''' BOUND- UP OF BILLS. Representative Camion and the Wiridom Successorship— The ladies to Honor the Memory of the Late Gen. Spinner— Congressman Phelan's Death. ABOUT! TRADE T ' WITS US We're after That Man! About one man' in ten doesn't know that the other nine of his fellow mortals have come t  the conclusion thut it's alwayssaf- Santa Fe- Bio Grande Absorption. SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Feb. 9.— A rumor is current in railroad circles here that a deal is on foot which will result in the absorption of the Rio Grande Western by the Santa Fe company. Presidents Manville and Palmer, of the respective roads, have both been here during the last few days and made trips   ENCEJ B."-!., Feb. 9.— The American ^ Sppol,, B^ bbia, and ^ Shuttle Want Campbell to Run Again, CINCINNATI. O., Feb. 9.— An important conference of Democratic leaders in Ohio was held at Cleveland, at which Governor Campbell was present. There were a number of politicians on hand from different sections of the state to discuss the. prospects for the fall cam-, paign and ' consider the advisability- of Campbell announcing" himself as a candidate for re- elechon.— Jt happened that nearly aU; tliose> present~ w. ere the friendsof the governor, and " it, was^ almost'the tmanimous'deniand^ that^ he should make the  i- anteed. * % 3b Special Department, The REPAIRING of the finest American English and Swiss Watches. O. G. BERNER Opposite Post- office. x PROP. The Origina\ Sandwich Sheller. The Best Force- Feed Sheller made. . The Sandwich hasraany^ imitators, but is by far the leader. It runs lightest, does thresh work and lasts longest. It stands the severest tests, you have examined the SANDWICH at " PEW BROS., LelVlars. \ o\ Don't bdyuntil "•*•"_ - HAR ST. notice is freight* Advance to St. Paul, Minn^ Feb. 9.^- pfficial £ that aon'. lPeb.^ G^ tne to St. ^ estern'will W ,1 t\- t _ t | V/\ J. " Af\**~*' t ?'* A\ flic Of the Same Opinion Still. WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.— The views of the minority of the Kama investigation committee are the same as those drawn up at the last session of congress, published at that time. Graduated Income Tax. WASHINGTON, Feb. 9. — Fithian of Illinois introduced a bill to provide for a graduated income tax to meet expenses for pensions in the army and navy. Senator Voorhees Very Sick. WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.— Senator Voorhees is seriously ill with a complication of rheumatism and other troubles. The Apportionment Act Approved. WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.— The president has approved the apportionment act. Veasey Banqueted. PROVIDENCE, ' E. I,, Feb. 9.— Gen. W. C. Veasey of Vermont, commanderin- chief of the Grand Army of the Kepublic was formally received by the members of the department of Shade Island. Gen. and Mrs. Veasey held a levee in the Narragansett hotel during the afternoon and at 6: 30 o'clock the commande^ was escorted by- 600 veterans and Sons'of Veterens from the hotel to Infantry hall, where aVbahquet was served:' A number of v grand- army and city officials ,_ were> * in - attendance^ and 1,200 covers, were; laid. - Addresses were made by J Gov. a Davis,* Col. , W:> 9.* Bos-, sell} of the Rhode ~ Island^. divisiqn Sons olaVeterans, sey, Prof.' Whitman, ] Eon:- C: invited~ by' Pil? J* T&- 11 LT— %* Bain & Ketcham LTJ MBEB WAGONS, MARSEILLES AND ADAMS, and Power Shellers and Feed Mills, Star, Champion and Adams Wind Mills. Hand and Underground Force Pump, BRASS CYL1BDER PUMP. All goods Warranted. BAILEY1"& CO. Save money by getting harness oil of freeman & Hines at LeMars Drug Stors, next to postoffice: Oil' your harness now, before you begin spring's work; oil is cheaper than leather. , - Neatsfoot Oil, United Sff Harness Oil. A CAN. 59T. V A. W. PARTRID © !, " "> - \ T.- « "*" ** W SUCCESSOR TO TOWS END BROST, ,.' ^ v^^ ~ ^ -. t','£ ^ w ^ - DEALER 1N- 71* t! ( Jus Haerling's old stand YOUNG MAN Lumber, Sash, D « or| Lime, Stucco, Cement, Hair HABD AND SOFT COAL, STOKE AND • W ~ • s Having purchased the lumber and coal business of TpWMfin I would respectfully ask tor further continuance of your patrona and will strive by fair and square dealing to meritthe -"' A. M, A. Moor, AJ.. VV* V. wilftie York vM. th&^ anaiian Athmtic and the So6i nor from Boston via thetfGanadian ^^ fi^ oWtraMiffialiB^ fife^ Dis-' WtcnSnd^ he^ i ^$ 1105^*^^ ^ mvNe  

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