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Le Mars Semi Weekly Post Newspaper Archive: June 27, 1899 - Page 1

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Publication: Le Mars Semi Weekly Post

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   Le Mars Semi-Weekly Post (Newspaper) - June 27, 1899, Lemars, Iowa                                 UJeeltl Published Every Tuesday and. Friday. EQUAL RIGHTS TO ALL AND SPECIAL PRIVILEGES TO NONE. YOLUME VI. L E MARS, IOWA, TUESDAY, J U N E 27, 1899. NUMBER 5 5 . As Firm Attitude of Great Britain i Having Desired Effect. HOT QUIET SO AKXI0U8 TO FIGHT. I n d i c a t i o n ! N o w P o i n t t o a Compromise • I n T r a n s v a a l Imbroglio— Oom Panl I t • Said t o U a v o Consented t o u More Llb- 1 oral F r a n o b l s e for U l t l a n d e r s . ! LONDON , Juno 26.— The Ann attitudo of Great Britain appears to be having the desired effect in the Transvaal complications. The latest cablegrams from South Africa talk of various semiofficial missions between Capetown, Bloemfeon tein and Pretoria, aiming to reach a franchise compromise on a basis of five or six years residence. President Kruger ks represented as agreeable to some arrangement, but as finding considerable ( difficulty in handling h i s own conservative elements. In a reported interview he is T e p r e s o n t e d to havo s a i d of tho war rumors that mountains wero being made b u t of molehills a n d t h a t ho was iirmly convinced t h a t Queen Victoria would never allow " letting looso tho d o g s o f war over South Africa." ! Oom P a u l l l u y l n g Itlilos. I LONDON , June 20.— Tho government pf tho South African republic, according to a dispatch to tho Daily Mail from Rome, is ordering largo quantities of rifles from Italian firms for shipment. T A G E P U T S O U T T O S E A . m i s s i o n of tins Treauh Cruiser May B e to Meet t i l e Sfux. BUEST , France, June 20.— The Froucn first class cruiser Tago put to sea yesterday, the official explanation being that fibo is going to experiment with carrier pigeons. Usually a torpedo boat is sent and the opinion gains ground that tho Tage has gono to moot tho Sfux and to take Captain Dreyfus on board. Tho pigeons con bo used to announce tlio transfer and tho Tage might proceed to another port to land tho prisoner. As against this theory aud as an indication that tho lauding of Dreyfus will be effected here there is tho fact that a large number of gendarmes from tho country around Brest are arriving. The treasurer of the famous lenguB of I the French Fatherland reached Brest last evening from Paris and as this organization has been at tho bottom of the auti- Droyfus movement it is thought he has come to orgauizo a demonstration. O L D C H I N E S E W A L L M U S T G O Government, of I t s Own Accord, W i l l D e stroy t h o A n c i e n t Ilurrler. • VI> EN, VKU , June 20.— According to • • $ r a n k Lews, a Chicago civil cnginoer, '•. Avho was hero yesterday,, a guest at tho Oxford hotel, tho Chinese/ government contemplates the destruction of tho ancieiit Ohineso wall that separates China proper from Ohineso Tartary. Ho is en route to China to assist in tearing down tho famous structure Mr. Lewis is a civil engineer and goes to China on behalf of a syndicate of Chicago capitalists. Ho said: " I understand that tho enterprise is one of the Ohineso government's own conception and is independent of Russian, Gorman or French influence. The cost will be great, involving millions of dollars." Rousseau's Speech t o P a r l i a m e n t . PAIUS , June 20— At the cabinet conn pil tho premier, M. Waldeck- Roussoau, read a draff; of his speech in parliament today, which is brief, merely auuouno ing that tho now ministry has no aim but to follow out the order of the day, voted June 12, whioh waB as follows " Tho ohamber is determined to support only a government resolved to defend vigorously republican institutions and to secure publio order and passes to the order of the- day." Germany W i t h d r a w s Objections. LONDON , June 26.— The correspondent of tho Daily Nows a t The Hague says: " Count Munster, the head of tho Gorman delegation has reooived Prince Hohenlohe's instructions and Gonnany will withdraw her objections to the establishment of a court of arbitration provided tho obligatory olauses are expunged. Tho Russians themselves do not expoot a majority for their disarjna^ mont proposals, which aro not advanced Boriously." j Baford B r i n g s Cubans. 1 NEWYOHK , June 20.— The United States transport!. Buford arrived yesterday from Havana, with 83 cabin passengers, 29 Cubans, 7 destitute Americans and 08 disoharged soldiers and governmo. ut- employes.: Twenty- four of the Cubans, xo adults and 5 children, are in eSarge of Jajnes H, Shook, who repre sents the Omaha exposition. They will represent the inhabitants of the Cuban village and will bo sent to sohool in this oouutxy, Bev. Paul Wetiel Dead. KANSAS CITY , Juno 26.— Rov. Paul Wetzel, one of the first German Dun kard clergymen to preaoh in this country, is dead. He died here in his 70th year. • Ho had proaohed in Somerset oounty, Pennsylvania; Franklin Grove and Lena, His.; . Grundy Center, la., and MoPherson, Kan. The interment will be at Grundy Center, la. ) ; PeiguauWM Not Enter AnaapoMt, | EtoaoBN, Wis., June 36.— Osoar W Deignan, wheelman of the Merrimoo, is • Ho this, city,- visiting his grandmother, ^ Ers. Bilen O 'Brion. He has given up - the idea of becoming a naval oadot. Ho has not the means to go through a >_ preparatory oonrfla. •. a x^ ioaiti and Drauth Bring famine, ' ij QT. V v t p w t m , Jwe ae .- r- The t » w ; . Gaiplflu regioa of Asiatio Bussia, Xwhto^ Js under the administration of ' thVgoyernor- geoeral of the Oauoasus, "^ lfe' , ^ imJ !^ tiinj( ki, is threatened with ' fan^, owing { p the prolonged orouth S T O R M DOES D A M A G E . B a r t l c y , Neb., SuO'ers F r om Italn a n d Hall, Kuvcmui I s F l o o d e d . BARTI. EY , Nob., Juno 20.— Bartlcy aud adjacent territory were visited by tho most destructive hail and rain storm in its history at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. For miles to tlio northeast not a stalk of corn or a speur of wheat is loft standing. Tho wholo country is flooded and thousands of dollars' worth of property destroyed. Tho B . and M. track is under water at this place, while boats can float all over the east part of town. Little hail insurauco is carried by tho farmers and the loss will bo heavily felt. " Hailstones measuring six and one- half inches in circumference j were picked up in town. j RAVENNA , Neb., Juno 20.— Fiveinches \ of rain fell here between 5 and 7 o'clock last evening. The streets are raging torrents of water, sidewalks are afloat and many cellars in the lower part of town aro flooded and much damage done to merchandise. Beaver crock is higher than ever before aud Soeley's mill dam is threatened with destruction. So fur the structuro has stood the pressure and a largo gang of men aro on guard watching far leaks. A washout is roportud nt the east oud of tho Burlington yards and a number of washouts have occurred between hero aud Broken Bow. Another largo ouo is reported near St. Michael, east of Ravenun. Roosevelt and His Rough Riders at Memorial Services. REVIEWS REGIMENTAL PARADE. Ten Thousand Persons Attend the T o u r n ament at Las Vegas— Governor of N ew York Starts o n Ills Return Trip Kust. P r e s e n t e d W i t h a Mortal. LAS VEOAS, N . M., Juno 20,— Memorial service was tlio first thing on tho rough ridors' reunion program yesterday. They wero held at tho Duncan opera house and Rev. Thomas A. Uzzell, pastor of tho People's tabernacle of Denver, preached the memorial ser moii. Lafe Young, editor of tho Iowa State Capital, then delivered an address. Mr. Youug served with the rough riders and his recitation of the regiment's experience at Taiupa and San Antonio found a rosponsivo echo in the hearts of tho assembled rough riders. " On tho plains of Culia," ho concluded, " when I T I M O T H Y D W I G H T R E T I R E S. Vcuerablo Krtucator Preaches Ills Last B a c c a l a u r e a t e Sermon at Ynlo. NEW HAVEN , Juno 2G.— President Timothy Dwight, tho voncrablo retiring president of Yalo university, yesterday preached h i s last baccalaureate sermon before t h o graduating classes of the academic a u d scientific departments. Tho occasion w a s also t h o 50th anniversary of President Dwight's own graduation. Many of his o l d classmates were i n t h e chapel. Tho graduating class occupied t h o greater part of tho body o f Battel chapol. All o f t- heni wore t h e academic robe and with them were many visitors from out o f town. President Dwight's address was largely of a retrospective and porsonal nature. At t h o close of t h e sermon President Dwight addressed a valedic t i o n i n t h o most solomu and iumressivo manner, his voice often choking with BBiotioa. S I O U X C I T Y B A N K I N A S U I T Some of t h o Stockholders Say a n Effort I s I l e i t i s Mailo t o Defraud Thctii. Sioux CITY , Juno 20.— Tho First National bank of Sioux City figures in a suit begun in the fodoral courts b y somo of t h e stockholders, who cliargo that t ho recent transfer of t h o controlling interest in t h o hank t o t h o Farmers' Loan and Trust company of Sioux City \ v.. s with tho object of defrauding thorn o ut of their interests b y " frcozing" them out through the levying of a b i g assessment. A number of other sensational charges aro made against t h o bank offi cials. Tho court is asked t o grout- au injunction preventing t h o transfer and to also appoint a receiver. Martin IHolcr's Murderers. CracAGO, June 20.— Tlio police stato that positive ovidenco has b e e n secured pointing t o Matt Smith aud " Coil'eo" Brauor, t w o sailors, as t h o m e n who robbed and murdered Martin Meier, t ho aged Swiss rcolusa, who was found doiul in h i s lonely h o m o on Wosfc Fif ty- sev enth street about throe weeks ago Smith and Brauer aro said to b o i n Michigan and several Chicago officers aro searching f o r them. Troops t e a v o Puna. PANA , Ills., Juno 20.— One hundred negroes yesterday hold a meeting at t h o Penwell mine offlco, at which they do cidod to refuse to re- enter t h e mine after the deporturo of the soldiers, uuless a heavy guard surrounds the mines day and night. While there aro many startling rumors afloat of hostilities following t h o soldiers departure today, local officials as well as union minors beliove there will bo no trouble T E L E G R A P H I C B R I E F S. Firo damaged the Moro Phillips chemical works of Camden, N. J., to tho extent of $ 100,000. In tho Kiol rogatta Sunday Emperor William sailed his yaoht Meteor, winning tho first traco. Tho Madrid Official Gazotto announces that tho offoctivo activo army for tho next fiscal year has been fixed ut 108,000 men. The Borlin brioklayors' striko has been settled by a court of arbitration and the men will got an advance • wages. Mrs. Elizabeth Storor Moad, prosident of Mount Holyokocolloge, has handed to the trustees her resignation, to take offeot one year from date. Jessie Porter, a chambermaid at tho Palmer house, Chicago, was shot and fatally wounded Sunday night by William G. Preuitt, who killed himself, The transport St. Paul soiled for S t Miohaol Sunday with 800 soldiers under Oolonol Ray, who are going north to relievo the troops now up on tlio Yukon. Hali Adali, tho Turkish wrostlor, threw three men twice each in 68 min utes at Cripple Creek, Sunday. His contract was to do the job in BOmluutos. The town of Hien Kng Fu, in Fo Kien, China, has been placarded with bills offering a reward of # 1,000 for tho heads of missionaries. Anti- foreign riots ore feared. Jay MoOlung. twelve years old, jeer ed * tramp on the Baltimore and Ohio ri& ytynear Aijamston, W, Va., Sunday. The tramp throw a stone at him which fractured the boy 's skull. The church of the Epiphany, one of the most prominent Episcopal ohurohes in Chicago, is to have a silver service made from ornaments, tableware and heirlooms of all sorts, contributions of over a hundred members of its fashionable congregation. The posse of officers whioh has been following the trail of the Union Faoifio robbers for three weeks has givou up the ohase an. d returned to ( Jasper, Wy. The trail was lost west of Thermopolis, in the Big Horn basin- It is believed the robhers. got into the Owl Creak COLONEL ROOSEVELT. saw the sons of veterans marching bo neath tho flng which their fathers died to savo, a n d tho sons of confederates clothed in the same uniform, bearing tho sanio arms and marching under tho samo flag, and tho sons of formor slaves, accoutercd and armed liko tho others with tho dug above theui and the same purpose in thoir hearts, aud 100 nativo horn, full blooded Indians soloctcd in tho samo linos and aiding tho same cause— when I saw theso I mado a vow to high heaven nuver to lie a partisan again and henceforth a n d forever all Americans should look alike to mo." The regimental parado took place a t o'clock under tlio regiment formed at Oainp Cochrnn and marched to tho tour nanient grounds, six blocks away. Col onol Roosevelt rode as a commander, ac companiod by a staff of officers, At tlio tournament grounds, Colonel Roosevelt occupied a box reserved for him and the guests of tho regiment. As tho rough riders passed and repassed tho grand sttuid in performing their ovolutions Colonel Roosevelt stood with bared head. Each troop was preceded by its respective captain, as far as they were present. Tlio scene was witnessed by fully 10,000 people. While tlio review was going on rain clouds wero banking heavily in tho north, and Chairman Whitnioro of tho local committee on arrangements rurmested tlio colonel to hurry the movement of tlio rough riders, ostensibly on account of tho approaching shower. Roosovclt complied with tho request, and in another instant tho troopers wore standing nt attention in front of the grand stand. This was a neat bit of strategy, and before Colonel Roosevelt could realize why ho was being spoken to, Hon. Frank Springer, acting on behalf of the people of New Mexico, began his speech presenting Colonel Roosevelt with a medal, j Colonel ROOHOVOH'S address was cut short by tlio rain, which put a stop to tho amusements of tho daylight program. At midnight Colonel Roosovelt left over tho Santa Fo road for Chicago. F O U R T H O F J U L Y I N H A W A I I . P r e p a r a t i o n s for u u E l a b o r a t e P r o g r am tu Cnnio OH'In H o n o l u l u Aro lielutf Made. HOXOLULU , June 18.— The first celebration of tlio Fourth of July in Hawaii under Ainorican sovereignty is to bo made a uiomorablo ouo. Tho genoral plan of oelobratiou includes salutes in the morning, at noon and at night, a grand parado, field sports, addresses and other literary exorcises and fireworks and a ball in tho ovening. An oxocutivo conunittce was appointed witli full power to provide for and carry out tho celebration. It is almost certain that tho chest containing $ 25,000 in gold, lost from tho steamship Alameda, was taken from tho ship a t this port. Tho man who is suspected of having robbed tho ship is also known to havo escaped boyoud tho Hawaiian law. Ho is now in Japan. N O N - U N I O N M E N U N P O P U L A R Cleveland Street Car S t r i k e Settled, b u t DemoiiBt r a t i o n s C o n t i n ue CLEVELAND , Juno 20.— Only ono^ gntbreak of violeuco attended tho resumption of traffic on all the lines of the Big Consolidated strooot railway yosterday. Thero was objection in somo parts of the city to tho retention of tho nonunion men who wore kept by the oompany. A party of 25 men assembled near tho Brooklyn bridge, just south of the city, and whenever a car came along with a non- union crow tho passengers wero asked to disembark and wait for a car manned by a union crew. In most cases tho passengors did as requested. Finally a non- union conductor undertook to argue with tho crowd and ho was promptly struck over tho head with a club and ho and tho lnotoramu driven away. The mob refused to permit the car to move until a union crow came along and pushed it to the barns. As a rule tho old men wero glad tho strike was settled, though, thero was some grumbling because tho non- union men aro kept. It is predicted that all the non- union mou will bo glad to leavo tho city within 80 days, though tho company imposed us ouo of the conditions of the agreement for tho settlement of tho rroublo that all tho now men should be treated with consideration by the old employes. P I T I L E S S E D I C T B Y W O M E N I d a May E IV I UE Sufl'erlua Terrible Punishment a t Maryville, Mo. MAKYVILLE , Mo., Juno 20.— Mrs. Ida May Ewing, tho young woman who was recently acquitted of tho cliargo of murdering her sister- in- law, is now undergoing puuishmont not contemplated in the criminal code. Dissatisfied with the jury's verdict, tho womon of tho community at Hopkins, Mo., havo ostracized her. They havo broken up her homo aud scattered hor family. Horl husband's business is ruined, for tho people will not patrouizo him, and sho, a social outcast, has sought rofugo iu tho home of her mother. E V E R Y M A N ' S H O M E And Entitled to tho Best Ho ca « Afford Cor it. littlo Money Now. We givo you an opportunity to afford the Best a t vofy THE LEFT OVER GOODS AT LEFT OVER PRICES. Month Almost Up, Call Soon. CLOSING OUT SALE F'ollovn/ irig a r e a F^ ew o f O u r P r i c e s. Cordlroy Covered Couches. $ 5 . 8 5 . Polish Oak Center Tabic Lthr Seat Arm Rocker Springs $ 1.45. 85c. $ 1.25. GRAND RAPIDS FURNITURE STORE Special Attention ( liven to UrrJerUking. LE M A R S . I O W A . Snont- tii'd'st n t C l i i n l i i n n l l. CIN'OIN. VATI , Juno 26.— J. Hauuu Deiler of New Orleans, president of tho North American Saengerbund, arrived hero last night to presiao over tho festival exorcises. A delegation from tho Iudiauupolis Music Vereiu wis here yesterday to arrange for quarters. Such delegations from difforont cities havo boon coming a r i d going for moro than a fortnight. Visitors to tho festival aro beginning to pour in. There wero two orchestra rehearsals yesterday. This evening ( here will I K ; a general rehearsal of all tlio musical forces at Music hall. I 'oiil Pluy 1H SuHpcutuil. WICHITA , Juno 20.— When tho body of Miss Belle Slaviu was found at H o'clock Inst Thursday morning in the oflice of the Katioual Bank of Commerce, dentil having resulted from a bullet wound in tlio head, it was supposed that she had committed suicide. loiter developments seem to indicate that tho young woman was murdered. Ooroner McLaughlin now says her death was not suicidal and tho poiicc :;.' onriw wprlcing on the theory that murder was done. I ' r i ' H h l P iM ( fOUH 1M Cliur<-' li, AOAMS , Mass., Junu 2 ( 1. — Tho ruin kept the president and all tlio members of his party indoors almost all tho fore noon , but it cleared up somewhat before noon and all except Mrs. McKinloy attended services at tho Congregational church, whero tho pastor, Rov. A . B. Ponuiman, preached on tho theme," War for Righteousness and Poaco." His argument wus that a struggle is necessary for development, ] r utul Itnller KxploHlon. PHOJUA , Ills., Juno SO.— Tlio boiler of the electric light plant at Fairview, 80 miles from hero, exploded, wrecking tho building, l< rank Stevous, tho eugineor was dug from tho dqbris, fatally manglod. Peter Bnrgor, who was in tho ongino room at tho time, escaped with an assortment of slight bruisos, but his wifo, who was with him, had her arm broken and rccoivod othor serious injuries. T E L E G R A M S T E R S E L Y T O L D . M g l i t H l l n r n l M K Tup: i n S, ul  oldyn . . . . J I M 7f. 1i r . ' l i i u l i i n i i t l . . ai HoM< m .....' 17 ID ( Ml New York... 1* 7 III l'llllu( let| ilila. ll'i 21 ll3fi|£ J ittHlHirt!.,.. BI 111 cuiituKo HI ail CO: IIJ. OU I HVIIIO.,,. IB mi Ht. L< illlK.... iM - M SKII Wiwllllietou. lS 40 Hnltfinure ... It) » l < V » |
                            

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