Le Mars Globe Post Lemars Iowa, October 11, 1923

Le Mars Globe Post Lemars Iowa

October 11, 1923

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Issue date: Thursday, October 11, 1923

Pages available: 12

Previous edition: Monday, October 8, 1923

Next edition: Monday, October 15, 1923

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Publication name: Le Mars Globe Post Lemars Iowa

Location: Lemars, Iowa

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Years available: 1891 - 1969

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Le Mars Globe-Post (Newspaper) - October 11, 1923, Lemars, Iowa " , ' 4 EtUblifhedin 1882 Issued Monday and Thursday LE MARS, IOWA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1923. Official County and City Paper VOLUME 30, NO. 82. FARMING IS NOW A BIG BUSINESS HIGH LAND PRICES MAKE TURN ON INVESTMENT IMPOSSIBLE RE- • • *' • • • » * * * * * * * * Court records In t h e Middle West d i s c l o s e that t h e majority ot the f a r m e r s who h a v e gone Into bankr u p t c y d u r i n g t h e p a s t three years fall Into two c l a s s e s: F i r s t , those who a r e ' caught with high- priced land when t h e depression came and, with t h e subsequent low p r i c e s on f a rm products, were unable to meet t h e i r p a y m e n t s or interest c h a r g e s ; Second, tenants whd' cont r a c t e d t o pay a fixed sum, based on i n f l a t e d values, for t h e U3e of farm a n d found that t h e i r income l e f t ' no o t h e r a l t e r n a t i v e than bankruptcy. O f ' t t f e s e , by far t h e l a r g e r . proport i o n who took a d v a n t a g e of the provision for v o l u n t a r y bankruptcy were c a s h t e n a n t s . " T h a t t h e r e were not m o r e Is duo soley to t h e fact that many l a n d l o r d s r e m i t t e d a largo part of t h e r e n t due, o n . t h e i r contracts. More Farm- Tenancy ' . D e s p i t e t h o n u m b e r of farm t e n a n ts who have gone to t h o wall, an - alarming i n c r e a s e In f a rm tenancy continues each year. In I o w a , for example, 23.8 per cent , of t h e f a r m s were operated by t o n a n t s in 1880. In 1920 t h o perc e n t a g e had climbed to 41.7 p e r cent. I t is n e a r e r 45 p e r c e n t a t t h e p r e s e nt t i m e and is, correspondingly higher t h r u o u t t h e middle west. The a n s w e r to t h i s situation is not h a r d to determine. The reason is found in t h e i n c r e a s i n g capitalistic n a t u r e o£ farming. In 1880 t h e a v e r a g e i n v e s t m e n t per farm in Iowa was $ 3893. ' In 1920 i t was $ 39,942. F a r m i n g h a s b e c o m e a big business w i t h a c o n s i d e r a b l e outlay of capital • beyond t h e m o a n s of t h e a v e r a g e man. If h e does' n o t a l r e a d y own a farm, ho h a s no o t h e r a l t e r n a t i v e but to rent. I n fact, h e would r a t h e r do thaf now t h a n buy b e c a u s e farm capitalization h a s outrun the. i n c r e a s e in farm incomes. If the p u r c h a s e r must pay 6 per c e n t on h i s money borrowed to acq u i r e a f a rm a n d t h e l a n d yields h im no more t h a n a l i v i n g or even as high a s two p e r c e n t , the r e t u r n s from o p e r a t i o n leave a staggering deficit which few d e s i r e to shoulder. • T h a t i s exactly the s i t u a t i o n today and Is a l o n e sufficient to e n c o u r a g e tenancy, r e g a r d l e s s of w h e t h e r a m a n possesses c a p i t a l ' o r n o t . Can Increase Revenue Then, t o o ; m a n y o w n e r s aro r e t i r i ng from the f a rm a n d r e n t i n g their land. ThtearVunable, t o s e l l t h e i r holdings ; fi ^$^ s1 ; IK'tfD » ' siaerab'le . loss which. * K I L L 287 R A T T L E S N A K E S . « .' * ON F A R M N E A R C R E S T O N * , • • * • • * • • • * • * * * • • • • • ' Mr. and Mrs. W i l l i am B a r l n s k y r e - ' t u r n e d Ih- iB w e e k from Union county, < Iowa, w h e r e they w e r e visitin g rela- l t l v e s for a b o u t a week. While there, Mr. B a r i n s k y w i t n e s s e d t h e k i l l i n g ot a bunch ot r a t t l e s n a k e s . The C r e s t on Daily A d v e r t i s e r gives the following r e p o r t on t h e s n a k e s : § " C o n s i d e r a b l e e x c i t m e n t w a s caused here by t h e s t o r y ot t h e killing of two h u n d r e d and e i g h t y " seven r a t t l e , s n a k e s on t h e - f a rm of Nels Davenport south of Kent a few dayB ago. In a d d i t i o n to t h e s n a k es t h e r e were t a k e n from the nestg 30 dozen snake eggs. The story has b e e n verified by s o m e of o u r c i t i z e ns At the same time comes the story of a s m a l l son of W. Clark having ben b i t t e n on b o t h legs In t h e v i c i n i ty of Alton." " WILD TEXAN PULLS OUT A BIG CANNON almost as large B B they would be able to realize through their own operation of the property. In other words, they can e n t e r some other business or p u r s u i t in t h o city., thus increasing t h e i r rovenue, live In comparative comfort a n d s t i l l make nearly UH much money oft" thi'lr ' f a rm a. s liicy have been able to,, without tin* atendant long hours and b a r d labor. All t h i s explains why a high perc e n t a g e of tenancy goes with high land values. It also' explains why f a rm property is a d r u g on t h e m a r k e t i n t h e m i d d l e west today, few farms a r e bint; sold. Over- capitalization has paralyzed the demand. The farmer even with the utmost, ingenuity, Is u n a b l e to e x t r a c t from the soil a ' s u f f i c i e n t revenue to pay a return MR. AND. MRS. A. M. DUUS MARRIED AND HA VE LIVED HERE FIFTY YEARS (. Continued On Eighty SCHESSLER RAIDS TWO TOWARD SOUTH James Madden and Pat Dunn Places Relieved of Equipment— Dunn at Large Dnpntv Sheriff Sam S c h e s s l c r ' w o nt down Klngsley way T u e s d a y to look up a couple of alleged distilleries nnd a r r e s t e d James Madden, who farms on section 111, Elkhorn township. Mndnn was b r o u g h t before Justice W. • S. F r e e m a n and hound to tho grand j u r y under a bond of $, 100. On Madden's farm ( was found a still anil coll, - 10 g a l l o n s of ryu mash and half a gallon liquor. Tho Put Dunn farm in. s e c t i on 14, Gurflod township, was also raided. A new p'ressuro tank, sfovo and a half gallon liquor were found; also lUO pounds corn sugar and some ompty sacks. Dunn was n o t a t home and has not yet been arrested. Runs Bert Rolllnger Up S t r e e t . and Decamps With Car— Exciting S t a l k in Dark Oscar S a n d e r s , grader 1 , who Is working on t h e j o b h a l t - w a y between here a n d Seney, was " n r r e s t e d late Tuesday night on t h e c h a r g e of chasing Dert Rolllnger with a g u n ' a n d stealing t h e l a t t e r ' s car. He w a s in t he county jail till" 10 o'clock this morning when he w a s r e l e a s e d on $ 500 bond. ••' The excitement happened about 10: 30 Tuesday night. Bert Rolllnger wjis sitting, in his c a r w h e n , according to his s t a t e m e n t , S a n d e r s approached h im and c o m m a n d e d h im to s t a y right t h e r e , e m p h a s i z i n g his request by p o i n t i n g a r e v b l v e r of l a r g e and Imp r e s s i v e cnlibor at said Rollinger's head. I g n o r i n g in p a r t t h e r e q u e s t , Rol l i n g e r s t a r t e d out h a s t i l y walking up t h e street, with S a n d e r s , in hot pursuit. At t h e Hanford cream station Rolllnger escaped in t h e d a r k . San d e r s then wont back, got into the I c a n , a n d left. I Rolllnger r e p o r t e d t h e a c t i o n to t h e police and S am Schessler,' deputy sheriff, was c a l l e d for. Mr. S c h e s s l er went to get Capt. Walter Huxtable and in company with him a n d J o hn Hoyle, night police, s t a r t e d out for t h e scene of action, a c o n s t r u c t i on camp on t h e road half- way to Seney. R e p o r t e r s on Scene In t h e m e a n time a couple of Globe- P o s t r e p o r t e r s , getting a sketchy s t o r y of t h e h a p p e n i n g s up to d a t e, d r o v e out a h e a d and p a r k e d their c ar n e a r the camp. Then, with comm e n d a b l e prudence, they crossed t he r a i l r o a d t r a c k and l a y In b a c k of t h e e m b a n k m e n t to wait for t h e expected gun- fight. In order to get t h o a t m o s p h e r e of t h i s story, it should bo s t a t e d that t h e night was balmy, with sparkling s t a r s . The hazy light of LeMars could b e s e e n faintly. The g r a s s w a s w e t and full of c o c k l e b u r r s . The t wo c r y of a c h i l d could bo hoard, for Sunders has a w i f e and t h r e e small children. P r e s e n t l y a l i g h t appeared up t h e r o a d — t h e officers were coming to make t h e a r r e s t. Drive With Flash Lights They stopped - their car some dist a n c e up t h e road, and approached c a u t i o u s l y on foot, using only a small flashlight. After circling tho tents t h e y called. Now was t h o time for S a n d e r s to shoot if ho w a s going to. Hilt he t u r n e d on a l i g h t and submitted. Ills weapon was t a k e n away from him. While be d r e s s e d he exp l a i n e d t h a t the g u n was n o t loaded while " dn town, though it was loaded at the time of a r r e s t. The car s t o o d o u t s i d e and w a s used to t r a n s p o r t t h e p r i s o n e r to town, a nd his trial w a s s e t for t h o n e x t morning. Tho trouble s t n r t e d . when Sanders brought his c a r to Rolllnger for r e p a i r s . Rolllnger refused to turn t he c a r over to h im b e f o r o being paid for t h o work, and stored It up a t his huuso, whereupon Sanders determined to t a k e Rollinger's. S a n d e r s Is said to bo a nati. vo of Amarillo, Toxas. Ho seems to bo fairly young and l o o k his a r r e s t calmly, smiling p l e a s a n t l y when asked whether he lfad heard tho p r e s s ear t u r n i n g around some time before his a r r e s t , l i e said many people, taking t h e road by m i s t a k e , had t u r n e d t h e re a n d he had a t t a c h e d no i m p o r t a n c e to it. In t h e s e days of rapid divorces and l i g h t n i n g s e p a r a t i o n s a golden wedding a n n i v e r s a r y is real news for which r e a s o n this event in t h e HveB of Plymouth county citizens Is always given a prominent position in the news columns. T h e l a t e s t to celebratg this event a r e Mr. a n d Mrs. A. M. Duus, who h a v e lived practically all of their m a r r i e d life In this t e r r i t o r y . Mr. Duus took care of the comfort and s e c u r i t y of o t h e r men's d o p e n d e n t a by s e l l i n g t h em Insurance; Mrs. Duus took c a r e of t h e comfort and s e c u r i ty of A. ' M. Duus by seeing that his r o a s t beef was done j u s t right a nd t h a t the brown gravy had Just t he r i g h t color. She h a s n o t t u r n e d out a living skeleton either. T h e a n n i v e r s a r y on T u e s d a y w a s a quiet home affair, only. Immediate members of t h e family being p r e s e n t. A. M. D u u s camo to LeMars d i r e c t ly from Denmark in 1870 a n d s e c u r e d a Job i n . . t h e first and t h e n the only g r o c e r y store in - LoMars, conducted by J o h n Gordon. He continued' in Mr. Gordon's employ for t w o y e a r s . Then he a n d Michael Stronck went to Hospors where they opened up a general s t o r e , also' t h e first and only one in town. Then camo grasshoppers— how this t h r e a d r u n s through all t h o s t o r i e s of p i o n e e r life! They held out three y e a r s and b u s i n e s s succumbed to t he d e s t r o y e r s . In the mean time Mr. Duus had b e e n married to Miss Grace A. M.- DUUS. LeMars" where Mr. Duus became a book- keeper for J. W. Van Sickel, ano t h e r picturesque c h a r a c t e r of early Iowa history, who h a s s i n c e died. In 1876 A. M. Duus a n d his brother, J. M. Duus, now a t Yankton, s t a r t ed an implement business and at t he MRS. DUUS. s a m e time conducted an insurance Wynia, d a u g h t e r of a prominent Sioux: a g e n c y , which was c o n t i n u e d in partc o u n t y family, a former resident of n e r s h i p until the fnll of 1879 when LeMars. They accepted the loss of A . M. DUUS was e l e c t e d to t h e Iowa t h e i r b u s i n e s s cheerfully and c a m e to l e g i s l a t u r e. In 1902 Mr. Dims and R. J . Koehler formed the LeMars Mutual Insurance a s s o c i a t i o n of which both are - still a c t i v e members. Mr. Duns is. universally known t h r o u g h o u t this part of t h o s t a t e and h a s been agent for some of his comp a n i e s almost fifty years. Mrs. Duus is known as a kindly and c o n s i d e r a te woman whose c h a rm c a p t i v a t e s every one who comes in the' c i r c l e ot her friends. . They Mn^ A^ Xiil£ P'$> lBU| A*.'!: t} fffi « .! i WEDS HARRY DENNY BRIDE IC DAUGHTER OF MR. AND MRS. MARTIN SCHAFER— MARRIED WEDNESDAY The Inquisitive Reporter Thls < column Is conducted by a newspaper reporter, together with t h o g e n e r a l public. Any live question of the day, on which you want tho opinion of five LeMars rosldeuts, plcaso address to " Tho Inquisitlvo R e p o r t e r " box 347, LeMars. Differe n t people will bo selected for opinions each Issuo of this paper. Let's liavo tho q u e s t i o n s. " When, and a t what age, do you t h i n k u girl should m a r r y ? " M. R. S LeMars, Iowa. Opinions F r a n k Deuel of Deuel & Thompson Drug s t o r e ; " For my opinion, a girl should bo m a r r i e d between the ages twenty-- iu and t h i r t y , and lu the mont' f J u l y ." ig; " According to my ago r t h a n tweuty- fivu or twenty, . hi t h o month of J u n e ." Dickensheots of ( luspar's ' I would suggest between t ho uires of olghtoon a n d twenty- three, a nd in Deconibor." ( X. A . B n y c n nf B n y c n Pnndy « H> o « > " W e l l , I boliovo a good tlm'o for a g i r l to bo m a r r i e d Is between tho uge ot twenty ami twenty- five and In A p r i l ." A, II, Cobb of Boston Cafe: " Well, not- m a k i n g unythlug official, but I believe between tho ages of twenty a n d t w e n t y - t h r o e a n d in May, as it is a good time to . s t a r t housekeeping." 1 was m a r r i e d in March, but believe May would pe b e t t e r ," nil not si. eight, 1). \\. s t u d i o : CLEVER SWINDLERS GE r T$ 300 FROM BANK Fake T e l e g r am Ordered Payment To " H . W. Wood"— Susp e c t s Arrested A clover swindle whoreby a s t r a n ger succeeded in c o l l e c t i n g $ 300 on a l a k e tejegenni was p e r p e t r a t e d recent, ly on t h e F i r s t National Dank of Hawarden, snys tho l l a w a r d e n Independent. Two men, c h a r g e d with complicity In t h o deal, were a r r e s t ed in Sioux City last Thursday, and a c h a r g e of c h e a t i n g by false pretenses was lodged a g a i n s t them. On August 29th' a s t r a n g e r , repres e n t i n g himself to bo II. W. Hood, . entered tho F i r s t National Bank nnd " prosontud a t e l e g r am from Duncombo Iowa, s t a t i n g that tho C o n t i n e n t a l & Commercial National Bank of Chicago had been a u t h o r i z e d to t e l e g r a p h h im $ 300 t o - t h o First National Hank of Hawanlon. Tho F i r s t National had received a t e l e g r am tho s a m e morning, o s t o n s l b e l y from tho Continental & Commercial National Bank of Chicago, a d v i s i n g t h em to p a y I I . W. Wood t ho s um ot $ 300 without identification. T h i s t e l e g r am waB n o t In tho code frequently used by b a n k s In transmitt i n g such mossu^ os but It d id b o a r t he p r i v a t e wire symbol to d e s i g n a t e tho p r i v a t e t e l e g r a p h wlro of tho Contiontal & Commercial National Hank The messages were roceived by .1. S. Egenes, night o p e r a t o r at tho Northw e s t e r n depot horo, on t h o o v n l n g of August 28th. Thoro was no n p a p r e nt r e a s o n to quoatlon t h o a u t h e n t i c i t y o£ t h o messages and tho $ 300 was nrnmnH.. .... II . . . No f u r t h e r t h o u g h t w a s givou to t h e m a t t e r by t h o b a n k employees until a f t e r a l a p s e ot a few d a y s when the draft to cover tho $ 300 payment falle " d to a r r i v e from the C o n t i n e n t a l & Com mercial N a t i o n a l Bank, The F i r s t N a . tlonal t h e n made i n q u i r y ot tho Chi cago bank r e q u e s t i n g information as to why tho draft had failed to a r r i ve and it t h e n developed that the Coutl- ( C o n t i n u e d On Page Bight) ( b y ^ F r ed The marriage of Miss Rosalind Schafer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M a r t i n Schafer of LeMars and H a r ry E. Denny of Bridegport, Conn., was Bolemnized at the St. J o s e p h ' s church on Wednesday morning, October 10, at u o 'clock, Rev. F a t h e r A. J . Schafer, n cousin of t h e bride reading the n u p t i a l mass. The c h u r c h had . beauti. ful floral dec * atlon of pink anil green for t h e occasion. Mrs. A n n a Bellalre p r e s i d e d at t h e organ and. played t he wedding march from Lohengrin. T h e bridal pair was a t t e n d e d by Mrs. Emmet J. Milholland,- a s i s t e r of the bride ot Fort Dodge, Miss Lois K a s s as flower girl and William fiubnlijrri. jjn wl » » other ^ fv » th » « J> cld » Twas I ' » W^£ ffi '' 1 * We% « a*"^*' wttir8a * in a lovol? gown of silver cloth inter woven in p a s t e l shades with lace and bead g a r n i t u r e . She w o r e a s i l v e r h a t with plumes in green, yellow and orchid. Her bridal bouquet was of o r c h i d s anil lillles of t h e valley. The m a t r o n of honor wore a gown of jade. groen silk, decorated in steel beads, with a s i l v e r bonnet and silver slipp e r s . Lois Kamm had on a d r e s s of w h i t e g e o r g e t t e , with a p i nk sash, poke bonnet and bows a basket of pink sweet- peas. The bride wan accompanied to t h e a l t a r by h e r f a t h e r, . Alartin Schafer. I m m e d i a t e l y following the ceremony a wedding breakfast was s e r v e d in t h e home of t h e b r i d e ' s p a r e n t s at 11 Sixth avenue N. 10., a t which only t he r e l a t i v e s and a few friends were p r e s e n t . Pink and green, tho brldnl^ colors prevailed in the bouse decorat i o n s . Roses combined with sweetpeas were the flowers used. Mr. and Mrs. Denny departed later for a m o t o r trip through the east Out of town g u e s t s were Mr. a n d M r s . f J".!'• , Rudolph Kamm and d a u g h t e r s , . Miss Marcella Shilling of Mlshawauka, Ind„ Mrs. M.. M a t t h e w s and Mrs. R. Webs t e r of San Francisco, Cal., Mrs. J a ne Denny of Bridegport, Conn., and Mr. and Mrs. Milholland of Fort Dodge. GLOBE- POST GIVES ALL * IMPORTANT SERIES DOPE * * * * * • * * • * • * * * • • * « • * • The Globe- Post has a s c o r e board posted In t h e window, giving the s c o r e by Innings of t h e World Series. Each inning is posted, and all Imp o r t a n t facts, sUch a s a home- run and who hit it, e t c . , Is p o s t e d in" t h e window. The s e r v i c e is given through t h e courtesy of Mrs. Earl Crowley at t h e Ilenn Electrical Shop. As soon as t h e i n n i n g is over, or a n i m p o r t a nt p l a y happens, the Globe- Post Is notified, and tho news is posted in t he window , in l e s s t h a n several minutes a f t e r tho play really h a p p e n s . Be in front of t h e officoi tomorrow. . The M e r t e s Electrical slipp alBO a s s i s t e d the Globe- Pqst in g e t t i n g ret u r n s . T E R M CALL OF REAPER JOHN PINNEY OF UNION TOWN SHIP AND C. B. MOLAMPHY ARE CALLED Two Cars Collide While Elmer KllKer of L e M a r s was out riding with his wife and family l a s t night, they were given a good s c a r e . They wore d r i v i n g south near t h e court, house, w h e n a o a r d r i v en t h e ' H o i t s r e w e < iar h i t KUUer'A car in the roar. No o n e was hurt, but all received a good s c a r e. 15,000 LAI SUIT NO 1 VERDICT DAMAGE W. FOR PLAINTIFF CASE AGAINST R. PAYNE IN i BOWLERS TO ROLL NEXT WEEK Announce Schedule for Coming Week Of October 15- 19 ' T)\<\ I. eMar. s Bowlers will open the season in t h e league, next Monday night. It is hoped that all t e a m s a ro lined up a n d t h a t e, ach man will make t h e qualification. The following Is t h e scedule for next week: Oct. If,-- Miller vs. Grau T r a c t o r Co. Oct, l( i - Pooclcus vs. llanson- Kaun. Oct. 17— H o r n e r ' s vs. P r i n t e r s. Oct. I S - Cooper vs. Zelg Cubs. Oct. 19— l l e n t g e s vs. Cities Service Oil. Miss Irene Duster, Remsen was a week- end guest of . Misses l'hllomena and J o s e p h i n e Braun. The trial of the d a m a g e suit of F r a n c e s Wren, by h e r mother, . Mrs. George Wren of Klngsley, was dismissed after the j u r y bad r e t u r n e d a verdict for t h e defendent, W. R. Payne, well- known Klngsley man. The plaintiff askod for 15,2( 10 dama g e s for p e r m a n e n t Injuries, whilo t he defense, endeavored to show that t h o r o was no evidence that tho inwere p e r m a n e n t . Payne had a l r e a d y paid the d o c t o r and hospital b i l l s following the g i r l ' s Injuries: Tho Iowa Cord T i r e Co. v s . F r a n c is W a g n e r et itl came t o * t r i a l a n d w a s s u b m i t t e d to t h e „'_._ today. The e a s e revolves around c e r t a y i group of tirt) B which were held in t r u s t by t he Wagnor garage, but which were stolen. The plaintiffs contended the t he g a r a g e was r e s p o n s i b l e and t h a t one of the p a r t n e r s was r e s p o n s i b l e for both. Tile h e a r i n g of Win. P e c k s , up for ' bootlegging, was sol for O c t . ' 13 at 10 a. m. T h e case of . Miles City National bank vs. J o h n L. Wilier has gone to t h e jury. A decree of forfeiture was signed In Elizabeth Finer vs. F. A. Anderson. The d e f e n d a n t s did nol app e a r . J. A. Strobol vs. George V.. Jel'fers et ul Settled and dismissed. F r a n k Slevers of on business today. Remsen was here John Maxwell Pinney died at t he S a t r e d Heart hospital after an ill n c s s of s e v e r a l months, on Wednesday October 10. Mr. " pinney was o n e of t h e old s e t t l e r s of Plymouth county, cpmlng here in 1S71, living in Union t o w n s h i p . J o h n Maxwell Pinney was b o r n in Delhi, Delaware county, New York on J a n u a r y 27, 1810, and w a s 83 y e a rs 8 months and 13 days of ago a t t ho t i m e ' o f his d e a t h . Mr. P i n n e y spent most of h i s boyhood days in Delhi. When still a boy, h i s folks and he came to E r i e White Side. 111., H e re h e was m a r r i e d to Miss. Lucy Char- ; latte.. WjDOjlaTd, i > sUitcdi. i h a s ^ b j ^ f l i i^ two y e a r s " a g o . Mr. arid" MfsTTlnriejr came t o P l y m o u t h c o u n t y ' i n 1871 a nd h a v e lived here ever since. Thoy were one of t h e f i r s t s e t t l e r s in Union township. He s p e n t several years of his life with his sons in South Dakota. Mr. Pinney is survived by three s o n s ; Fred of Imperial Valley, Gal., F r a n k L. of E l c e n t r o , Cal., a n d George of Armour. S. 1). One d a u g h t e r , Mrs. C. C. L a d d u s aw of Rrooklngs, S. D. . Mis. Cecile . McGrudor, a n o t h e r daught e r , died eight yours ago. Robert Pinney of Viburg, S. D., a b r o t h e r, and ten grand children, survive tho deceased man. The funeral will ho held Friday afternoon at t h e M. E. church, at 2: 3, Rev. C. II. Seward officiating. * * « • * * * * * * « « • * * « • * * • SOME PRETTY GOOD * * ONES TOLD AT FEED * * * * * * * « • * • • • * • • * * • • The only thing that keeps the ave r a g e banqueter from bolting when t h e obsequies begin Is t h e funny s t o r l e s which he hopes V. III be irdii. so the r e p o r t cm t h e " r a i l r o a d 4 > ; mquet" Tuesday night would not be complete without an account of a few. M. . L. Countryman, vice president M :< i mineral council ot the Great N o r t h e r n Ry. told tho o n e about t he Yankee farmer who n e v e r volunteered Information and spoke only when spoken to. It seems that a n e i g h b o r met. h im at t h e c r o s s r o a d s once and a s k e d him, " Say Obadlab what did you give your chickens when they had tho p ip last year.?" " I give ' em t u r p e n t i n e and mo. l a s s e s . ' " G'bye Obndlnb.'' " G'bye John." A few weeks l.' vter they met again, and this ensued: " O b a d l a b , I thought yon told me you give your hens t u r p e n t i n e and . molasses when they bad t h e pi]).' " I dlil that. " John." " Well. I did t h a t for mine and t h ey all died." " So did mine, J o h n ." " What we need,' said T. F. Flynn. d i r e c t o r of public r e l a t i o n s for t he r a i l r o a d , " is more o p t i m i s t s . " " There a r e too many pessimists,, be added, looking for a bare place on t h e t a b le to pound. " A p e s s i m i s t , when ready to die, buys a pitch- fork; an opjtlmlsj. buys a h a r p and l e a r n s to play It. I knew a farmer in M i n n e s o t a who complained about tho d r y weather. » 1 pointed to some clouds on t h e horizon and said they surely must i contain r a i n . ' Rain ( b l a n k ) ! ' ho exclaimed, t h o s e are j u s t empties coming back from Iowa." What tho r a i l r o a d s want," he continued, " is more good fellowship, more b r o t h e r l y love." To show what he m e a n t ho told h ow Chas. Klltrell, an old f r i e n d of h i s, was late g e t t i n g home one night , audi his wife s e n t five t e l o g r a n i s of i n q u i r y 1 to five friends of his. P r e t t y soon t h e first answer came, s l a t i n g that C h a r l i e was s p e n d i n g the night, t h e r e. A little later Charlie came in himself with a d i s a b l e d flivver. Whilo Mrs. K i t t r e l l puzzled over this, four more t e l e g r a m s came in, s t a t i n g , " Y e s , Charlie is" s p e n d i n g the night, with me." That, said Mr. Flynn, was b r o t h e r l y love. GREAT NORTHERN OFFICIALS HERE GENERAL COUNSEL UPHOLDS ESCHCUMMINGS LAW AS GOOD SALINGER LOSES LIBEL SUIT Cornelius li. . Molamphy, 41 y e a r s of uge, died at a C h e r o k e e hospital on Monday, October 8. death caused by general p a r a l y s i s and a break- down in h e a l t h . Mr. Modamphy w a s b o r n In LoMars on December 7. 1881. He g r a d u a t ed from the LeMars high school In 18S9. After being born and raised in l, e Mars, and t w o y e a r s after his graduat i o n be went to Chicago, where ho engaged In work. He bus made several visits to LeMars slnco being In Chicago. For two y e a r s be was secr e t a r y of t h e American Writing Paper Company at llolyoke, Mass. lie stifle re'd a break- down in health two y e a r s « go, which lie never recovered. The funeral was held this morning at 9 o'clock from Wiltgen's I'ndcrt n k i n g parlor to t h o St. J a m e s clinch, and buriul made in t h e Catholic cemetery. Mr. Molamphy leaves to mourn his loss his beloved wife, one s i j t e r , Mrs. M. 1!. Redmond of LeMars and t h r ee b r o t h e r s , Philip and George of Sioux City and Roger at Quinn, S. I). Mr. and . Mrs. J o e S t e w a r t of Omaha, former Plymouth county people, will leave soon for California for an extended visit. PLANT WIZARD PACKS EGGS FOR T H E W H I T E HOUSE BREAKFAST TABLE At t h e P e t a l u i n a ( Calif.) National Egg Day c e l o b r u t l o n , Luther Burbank, tho c e l e b r a t e d plant wizard, p a c k e d a special gift case of super- fresh extra- fancy eggs for P r e s i d e n t a n d Mrs, Coolldge. F a i l s to Get Damages From Des 1 Moines Editor Des Moines, la., Oct. 11.— Ben I. S a l i n g e r , formur Justice of t h e Iowa s u p r e m e court, lost h i s llbol suit for $ 10,000 damages against, former Sena t o r Lafayette Young, editor of t he Des Molnos Capital, in d i s t r i c t court hero today. Judgo F r a n k l i n declaring t h a t verdict for t h e defendant be r e t u r n e d . Senator Young, In - an. editorial pubtl Jfstied i n Fehoruray, Hdil, stated - Jhat 1 Salinger, then s e r v i n g as a member of t h e s u p r e m o court, bad uttonded a commilleo m e e t i n g of t h o s t a t e legi s l a t u r e and u r g e d that tho c o m m i t t ee members recommend for p a s s a g e a bill providing for in i n c r e a s o in t he number of s u p r e m e court judges. T h e s e n a t o r asked that the legislature t a k e ' n o such action, ami urged the judges to " get to w o r k " instead. J u d ge S a l i n g e r denied that he a t t e n d e d the committo meeting or urged any such a c t i o n as s t a t e d by S e n a t o r Young. In his suit, the j u d g e hold t h a i he haiUbeen damaged. After taking of defense testimony for two days, a t t o r n e y s I'm; Senator Young asked that, the case be dismissed. Judgo F r a n k l i n ordered the j u r y to r e t u r n a d i r e c t e d verdict and said that, his o r d e r was in line with a r e c e n t state- supremo court opinion on t h e libel laws of Iowa. HEALTH HINTS ON PAGE THREE If Read, May Avoid Illness In t he Coming Winter Tho Globe- Post is publishing reg u l a r l y some " H e a l t h Hints,,, which may he very helpful to ' i t s r e a d e r s. If the r e a d e r will t u r n to page three and give tho h e a l t h hints a o n c e o v er p e r h a p s It will be very valuable in the near future. Tim Commercial club banquet Tuesday night was a " r a i l r o a d evening." Officials of t h e Great Northen railroad, which passes through Dalton, were the guests, including N, L. Countryman, vice p r e s i d e n t and general counsel, F. II. Livingston, assist a n t s u p e r i n t e n d e n t nf t h e Sioux City d i v i s i o n : P. F, Keating, general sup e r i n t e n d e n t of t h e e a s t e r n d i s t r i c t; P. If. I l u r n h a n i , g e n e r a l freight a g e n t; T. F. Flynn, director of ptibllc rel a t i o n s ; and T. W. F l a h e r t y , station agent at Dalton. The principal speaker of t h e evening was Mr. C o u n t r y m a n , and h i s subject was I lie Kseh- Cummlns transport a t i on act, which has been under sev e r e fire since its adoption in cong r e s s . Mr. Countryman r e m a r k e d that t hn r a i l r o a d s , as soulless corporations, had a p p a r e n t l y Incurred the dlsllko to t h e m a s s of t h e people, although t h e railroads are t h o g r e a t e s t single s e r v a n t t h a t t h o puople have, lie s a id the. r a i l r o a d s have been t r y i n g b a r d to give good s e r v i c e w i t h o u t paying a ny a t t e n t i o n to w h e t h e r the people realized It or not, nnij tho people have . c o n s e q u e n t l y heard only t h o sldn of t h o politicians. Now the- railroads have come to reall/. o what a formida b l e thing an aroused public cons c i o u s n e s s Is, a n d t h e y a r e h a s t e n i ng to present, t h e i r side of t h e c a s e. Out Of Chaos T h e speaker briefly enumerated t h e main points of tins Esch- Cummlns law. which, ho said, lifted tho railr o a d s out of c h a o s Into o r d e r ; out o t a niultpllcity of c o m m i s s i o n s and s n a r l e d - u p political tangles into t ho s y s t e m a t i c and very public management of t h e I n t e r s t a t e Commerce commission. I n s t e a d of allowing tho r a i l r o a ds to combine as they pleased, mani p u l a t e ratos as t h e y pleased, build and abandon lines us they pleased, t h o Eseh- Cummlng l aw p u t s t h em under strict governmental control. T h e y a r e not allowed to e a r n more five and - t h r o o q u a r t e r s per t h o u g h this does not bother much, being more than the of t h em can e a r n anyway, T h e vailrouds t h e m s e l v e s do not like all t h e g o v e r n m e n t a l r e s t r i c t i o ns Imposed upon them, but t h e y a r e willing to put, u p w i t h t h em b e c a u s e ot tlie fact that it e n a b l e s t h e m to do b u s i n e s s much more efficiently. Mr. Country m a h spoke bitterly Lagalnst " r a d i c a l p o l i t i c i a n s , " sutlb, a s , Ilrbffkhart, whose solo object accordi n g to him, is t o o l e v a t o t h e m s e l v es by t e a r i n g down. All o v e r the country, said the s p e a k e r , men a r o b e i np sent to c o n g r e s s oh t h e s t r e n g t h of t h e i r promise to ' ' s m a s h the- railr o a d s . " If t h e r e a r e enough nf t h em t h e y will succeed in doing this, a nd if they smash the r a i l r o a d s they will smash the c o u n t r y , which grew up around, t h e r a i l r o a d s and which would go hack again to i t s o r g i u a l s t a t e It' tho r a i l r o a d s were smashed. Community Songs F. A. Horner was c h a i r m a n . Short, a d d r e s s e s were made by Guy S l r u h l o, T. F. Flynn, and a n u m b e r of o t h e r s. Illll Koenlg was yell leader for t ho community singing, aud " Sweet". Adeline" was h a r m o n i o u s l y rendered. Miss Aloysius Wasmer and Mrs. Glenn Winders sang vocal solos that, were much appreciated. Crowley's o r c h e s t r a played while supper was being served. A l e t t e r from Moso Reed was r e a d. Mr. Reed expressed bis willlngnosss to lead t h e b a n d next year. Tho Wedn e s d a y night bargain day w a s mentioned, to he fought out a t leisure among the r e t a i l e r s. t h an cent. t h em most J u d g e Newby To Speak J u d g e Miles W. Newby of t h e Wood, bury county district court In Sioux City Is to deliver an a d d r e s s at Le Mars, in tho F i r s t Congregational church on Sunday, October 21 one week from next Sunday. Ills sub; j e c t will be " The C o n s t i t u t i o n ami Americanism". The o c c a s i o n of J u d ge Newby's coming t< » I. e. Mars at this time is a vesper service to be given by the choir of the Congregational church on Sunday afternoon at I o' clock, October 21. The s e r v i c e will bo free to everyone and t h e public is urged to atend. MRS. J. A. SHADE, KINGSLEY, DIES Wife of Well Known Plymouth County Man Succumbs to Prolonged Illness Mrs. J. A. Shade, ( H) y e a r s old, for more than 3T, y e a r s a resident of Woodbury county, died Sunday night at Shadi'land, the farm home of t he Shade family, one mile north of Klngsley. DoiAh was t h e r e s u l t of a complication of diseases and followed a prolonged Illness. Active in church and lodge circles at Klngsley, Mrs. S h a d e was widely known throughout tho country. She was a member of t h e Klngsley Cong i v g a l l u u a l church and t h e Kingsloy c h a p t e r of tho Order of tho E a s t e rn Star. Funeral heivices were held at the home today with tho m e m b e r s ot t he E a s t e r n Star conducting tho regular burial ritual. Tim husband, who survives, is widoh- known throughout ibis section as a r a i s e r of' piiruii'r'ed livestock. Kin- many yclus he bus o p e r a t e d the Shudolund Slock farm and lias boon an exhibitor a t t h o l n t o r s t a t o fair apt! o t h e r fairs In tho middle west, A brother, Charles Eutli, Kingsley clovator man, a n d two sons and t wo d a u g h t e r s also survive. Tho c h i l d r en a r s : George Shade of Klngsley, Junior Shade ot Los Angeles, Mrs. C. 0 . Cook of Sergeant Bluffs, la., and Chlorls Shade ot Peoria, 111, THIEVES BREAK INTO WASH. TWP. HOME Steal Wr. tch, Clothes and Money and No Trace of Them Has been Found So Far While Arnold F. Kilker and family of Washington township were attending the fall festival at llrunsville Saturday. Octot- er li, t h i e v e s entered tho house by unlocking the door with a puss key. T h e i r haul Included a 17 j e w e l watch a suit, of chillies, about iff,. DO from a p u r s e of Mrs. K i l k e r ' s and a c h i l d ' s banlc c o n t a i n i n g about if:!. A half loaf of bread was a l s o taken, which may or may nol I n d i c a t e that, t h e r a id was tho work of a t r a m p , as t h e b r e a d may have been purposely taken to make if look like a holme's work. Mr. Kilker reported the theft to S h e r i f f Maxwell early Sunday morning, but no t r a c e ot Hie t h i e v e s has been found as y e t . Mr were and Mrs. F r a n k Glaser a n d s on Sioux City visitors Saturday. NOW 80 cfs. Below is t h e a v e r a g e of t h o L e M a rs m a r k e t s . Wheat sr; Yellow corn 80 While c o m ^ r > Ear corn " 8 o u ls Ilarlev - i~> DAIRY PRODUCTS d a i ry p a c k i n g stock Mutter, flutter. Cream 40 28 . 1 1 I t ivy '- c„ v • leavy ' . l g h t Hens I'Ol. U ' l'R v • springs . 1 4 o n a .16 s te Kggs, cash 27, t r a d e 28 H l b r i S , Wi. OL AXVD i ^ r . nV Hides, no. 1, g r e e n 06 Hides, No. 2, g r e e n 05 Wool, fine S5- 40 Wool, m e d i um S0- S5 Wool, coarsn Tallow No. I-- 60 Tallow No, 1.- 4* ;

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