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Le Mars Globe Post Newspaper Archive: October 11, 1923 - Page 1

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Location: Lemars, Iowa

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   Le Mars Globe-Post (Newspaper) - October 11, 1923, Lemars, Iowa                                 " , ' 4 EtUblifhedin 1882 Issued Monday and Thursday LE MARS, IOWA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1923. Official County and City Paper VOLUME 30, NO. 82. FARMING IS NOW A BIG BUSINESS HIGH LAND PRICES MAKE TURN ON INVESTMENT IMPOSSIBLE RE- • • *' • • • » * * * * * * * * Court records In t h e Middle West d i s c l o s e that t h e majority ot the f a r m e r s who h a v e gone Into bankr u p t c y d u r i n g t h e p a s t three years fall Into two c l a s s e s: F i r s t , those who a r e ' caught with high- priced land when t h e depression came and, with t h e subsequent low p r i c e s on f a rm products, were unable to meet t h e i r p a y m e n t s or interest c h a r g e s ; Second, tenants whd' cont r a c t e d t o pay a fixed sum, based on i n f l a t e d values, for t h e U3e of farm a n d found that t h e i r income l e f t ' no o t h e r a l t e r n a t i v e than bankruptcy. O f ' t t f e s e , by far t h e l a r g e r . proport i o n who took a d v a n t a g e of the provision for v o l u n t a r y bankruptcy were c a s h t e n a n t s . " T h a t t h e r e were not m o r e Is duo soley to t h e fact that many l a n d l o r d s r e m i t t e d a largo part of t h e r e n t due, o n . t h e i r contracts. More Farm- Tenancy ' . D e s p i t e t h o n u m b e r of farm t e n a n ts who have gone to t h o wall, an - alarming i n c r e a s e In f a rm tenancy continues each year. In I o w a , for example, 23.8 per cent , of t h e f a r m s were operated by t o n a n t s in 1880. In 1920 t h o perc e n t a g e had climbed to 41.7 p e r cent. I t is n e a r e r 45 p e r c e n t a t t h e p r e s e nt t i m e and is, correspondingly higher t h r u o u t t h e middle west. The a n s w e r to t h i s situation is not h a r d to determine. The reason is found in t h e i n c r e a s i n g capitalistic n a t u r e o£ farming. In 1880 t h e a v e r a g e i n v e s t m e n t per farm in Iowa was $ 3893. ' In 1920 i t was $ 39,942. F a r m i n g h a s b e c o m e a big business w i t h a c o n s i d e r a b l e outlay of capital • beyond t h e m o a n s of t h e a v e r a g e man. If h e does' n o t a l r e a d y own a farm, ho h a s no o t h e r a l t e r n a t i v e but to rent. I n fact, h e would r a t h e r do thaf now t h a n buy b e c a u s e farm capitalization h a s outrun the. i n c r e a s e in farm incomes. If the p u r c h a s e r must pay 6 per c e n t on h i s money borrowed to acq u i r e a f a rm a n d t h e l a n d yields h im no more t h a n a l i v i n g or even as high a s two p e r c e n t , the r e t u r n s from o p e r a t i o n leave a staggering deficit which few d e s i r e to shoulder. • T h a t i s exactly the s i t u a t i o n today and Is a l o n e sufficient to e n c o u r a g e tenancy, r e g a r d l e s s of w h e t h e r a m a n possesses c a p i t a l ' o r n o t . Can Increase Revenue Then, t o o ; m a n y o w n e r s aro r e t i r i ng from the f a rm a n d r e n t i n g their land. ThtearVunable, t o s e l l t h e i r holdings ; fi ^$^ s1 ; IK'tfD » ' siaerab'le . loss which. * K I L L 287 R A T T L E S N A K E S . « .' * ON F A R M N E A R C R E S T O N * , • • * • • * • • • * • * * * • • • • • ' Mr. and Mrs. W i l l i am B a r l n s k y r e - ' t u r n e d Ih- iB w e e k from Union county,   lBU| A*.'!: t} fffi « .! i WEDS HARRY DENNY BRIDE IC DAUGHTER OF MR. AND MRS. MARTIN SCHAFER— MARRIED WEDNESDAY The Inquisitive Reporter Thls   o « > " W e l l , I boliovo a good tlm'o for a g i r l to bo m a r r i e d Is between tho uge ot twenty ami twenty- five and In A p r i l ." A, II, Cobb of Boston Cafe: " Well, not- m a k i n g unythlug official, but I believe between tho ages of twenty a n d t w e n t y - t h r o e a n d in May, as it is a good time to . s t a r t housekeeping." 1 was m a r r i e d in March, but believe May would pe b e t t e r ," nil not si. eight, 1). \\. s t u d i o : CLEVER SWINDLERS GE r T$ 300 FROM BANK Fake T e l e g r am Ordered Payment To " H . W. Wood"— Susp e c t s Arrested A clover swindle whoreby a s t r a n ger succeeded in c o l l e c t i n g $ 300 on a l a k e tejegenni was p e r p e t r a t e d recent, ly on t h e F i r s t National Dank of Hawarden, snys tho l l a w a r d e n Independent. Two men, c h a r g e d with complicity In t h o deal, were a r r e s t ed in Sioux City last Thursday, and a c h a r g e of c h e a t i n g by false pretenses was lodged a g a i n s t them. On August 29th' a s t r a n g e r , repres e n t i n g himself to bo II. W. Hood, . entered tho F i r s t National Bank nnd " prosontud a t e l e g r am from Duncombo Iowa, s t a t i n g that tho C o n t i n e n t a l & Commercial National Bank of Chicago had been a u t h o r i z e d to t e l e g r a p h h im $ 300 t o - t h o First National Hank of Hawanlon. Tho F i r s t National had received a t e l e g r am tho s a m e morning, o s t o n s l b e l y from tho Continental & Commercial National Bank of Chicago, a d v i s i n g t h em to p a y I I . W. Wood t ho s um ot $ 300 without identification. T h i s t e l e g r am waB n o t In tho code frequently used by b a n k s In transmitt i n g such mossu^ os but It d id b o a r t he p r i v a t e wire symbol to d e s i g n a t e tho p r i v a t e t e l e g r a p h wlro of tho Contiontal & Commercial National Hank The messages were roceived by .1. S. Egenes, night o p e r a t o r at tho Northw e s t e r n depot horo, on t h o o v n l n g of August 28th. Thoro was no n p a p r e nt r e a s o n to quoatlon t h o a u t h e n t i c i t y o£ t h o messages and tho $ 300 was nrnmnH.. .... II . . . No f u r t h e r t h o u g h t w a s givou to t h e m a t t e r by t h o b a n k employees until a f t e r a l a p s e ot a few d a y s when the draft to cover tho $ 300 payment falle " d to a r r i v e from the C o n t i n e n t a l & Com mercial N a t i o n a l Bank, The F i r s t N a . tlonal t h e n made i n q u i r y ot tho Chi cago bank r e q u e s t i n g information as to why tho draft had failed to a r r i ve and it t h e n developed that the Coutl- ( C o n t i n u e d On Page Bight) ( b y ^ F r ed The marriage of Miss Rosalind Schafer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M a r t i n Schafer of LeMars and H a r ry E. Denny of Bridegport, Conn., was Bolemnized at the St. J o s e p h ' s church on Wednesday morning, October 10, at u o 'clock, Rev. F a t h e r A. J . Schafer, n cousin of t h e bride reading the n u p t i a l mass. The c h u r c h had . beauti. ful floral dec * atlon of pink anil green for t h e occasion. Mrs. A n n a Bellalre p r e s i d e d at t h e organ and. played t he wedding march from Lohengrin. T h e bridal pair was a t t e n d e d by Mrs. Emmet J. Milholland,- a s i s t e r of the bride ot Fort Dodge, Miss Lois K a s s as flower girl and William fiubnlijrri. jjn wl » » other ^ fv » th » « J> cld » Twas I ' » W^£ ffi '' 1 * We% « a*"^*' wttir8a * in a lovol? gown of silver cloth inter woven in p a s t e l shades with lace and bead g a r n i t u r e . She w o r e a s i l v e r h a t with plumes in green, yellow and orchid. Her bridal bouquet was of o r c h i d s anil lillles of t h e valley. The m a t r o n of honor wore a gown of jade. groen silk, decorated in steel beads, with a s i l v e r bonnet and silver slipp e r s . Lois Kamm had on a d r e s s of w h i t e g e o r g e t t e , with a p i nk sash, poke bonnet and bows a basket of pink sweet- peas. The bride wan accompanied to t h e a l t a r by h e r f a t h e r, . Alartin Schafer. I m m e d i a t e l y following the ceremony a wedding breakfast was s e r v e d in t h e home of t h e b r i d e ' s p a r e n t s at 11 Sixth avenue N. 10., a t which only t he r e l a t i v e s and a few friends were p r e s e n t . Pink and green, tho brldnl^ colors prevailed in the bouse decorat i o n s . Roses combined with sweetpeas were the flowers used. Mr. and Mrs. Denny departed later for a m o t o r trip through the east Out of town g u e s t s were Mr. a n d M r s . f J".!'• , Rudolph Kamm and d a u g h t e r s , . Miss Marcella Shilling of Mlshawauka, Ind„ Mrs. M.. M a t t h e w s and Mrs. R. Webs t e r of San Francisco, Cal., Mrs. J a ne Denny of Bridegport, Conn., and Mr. and Mrs. Milholland of Fort Dodge. GLOBE- POST GIVES ALL * IMPORTANT SERIES DOPE * * * * * • * * • * • * * * • • * « • * • The Globe- Post has a s c o r e board posted In t h e window, giving the s c o r e by Innings of t h e World Series. Each inning is posted, and all Imp o r t a n t facts, sUch a s a home- run and who hit it, e t c . , Is p o s t e d in" t h e window. The s e r v i c e is given through t h e courtesy of Mrs. Earl Crowley at t h e Ilenn Electrical Shop. As soon as t h e i n n i n g is over, or a n i m p o r t a nt p l a y happens, the Globe- Post Is notified, and tho news is posted in t he window , in l e s s t h a n several minutes a f t e r tho play really h a p p e n s . Be in front of t h e officoi tomorrow. . The M e r t e s Electrical slipp alBO a s s i s t e d the Globe- Pqst in g e t t i n g ret u r n s . T E R M CALL OF REAPER JOHN PINNEY OF UNION TOWN SHIP AND C. B. MOLAMPHY ARE CALLED Two Cars Collide While Elmer KllKer of L e M a r s was out riding with his wife and family l a s t night, they were given a good s c a r e . They wore d r i v i n g south near t h e court, house, w h e n a o a r d r i v en t h e ' H o i t s r e w e < iar h i t KUUer'A car in the roar. No o n e was hurt, but all received a good s c a r e. 15,000 LAI SUIT NO 1 VERDICT DAMAGE W. FOR PLAINTIFF CASE AGAINST R. PAYNE IN i BOWLERS TO ROLL NEXT WEEK Announce Schedule for Coming Week Of October 15- 19 ' T)\  sUitcdi. i h a s ^ b j ^ f l i i^ two y e a r s " a g o . Mr. arid" MfsTTlnriejr came t o P l y m o u t h c o u n t y ' i n 1871 a nd h a v e lived here ever since. Thoy were one of t h e f i r s t s e t t l e r s in Union township. He s p e n t several years of his life with his sons in South Dakota. Mr. Pinney is survived by three s o n s ; Fred of Imperial Valley, Gal., F r a n k L. of E l c e n t r o , Cal., a n d George of Armour. S. 1). One d a u g h t e r , Mrs. C. C. L a d d u s aw of Rrooklngs, S. D. . Mis. Cecile . McGrudor, a n o t h e r daught e r , died eight yours ago. Robert Pinney of Viburg, S. D., a b r o t h e r, and ten grand children, survive tho deceased man. The funeral will ho held Friday afternoon at t h e M. E. church, at 2: 3 , Rev. C. II. Seward officiating. * * « • * * * * * * « « • * * « • * * • SOME PRETTY GOOD * * ONES TOLD AT FEED * * * * * * * « • * • • • * • • * * • • The only thing that keeps the ave r a g e banqueter from bolting when t h e obsequies begin Is t h e funny s t o r l e s which he hopes V. III be irdii. so the r e p o r t cm t h e " r a i l r o a d 4 > ; mquet" Tuesday night would not be complete without an account of a few. M. . L. Countryman, vice president M :< i mineral council ot the Great N o r t h e r n Ry. told tho o n e about t he Yankee farmer who n e v e r volunteered Information and spoke only when spoken to. It seems that a n e i g h b o r met. h im at t h e c r o s s r o a d s once and a s k e d him, " Say Obadlab what did you give your chickens when they had tho p ip last year.?" " I give ' em t u r p e n t i n e and mo. l a s s e s . ' " G'bye Obndlnb.'' " G'bye John." A few weeks l.' vter they met again, and this ensued: " O b a d l a b , I thought yon told me you give your hens t u r p e n t i n e and . molasses when they bad t h e pi]).' " I dlil that. " John." " Well. I did t h a t for mine and t h ey all died." " So did mine, J o h n ." " What we need,' said T. F. Flynn. d i r e c t o r of public r e l a t i o n s for t he r a i l r o a d , " is more o p t i m i s t s . " " There a r e too many pessimists,, be added, looking for a bare place on t h e t a b le to pound. " A p e s s i m i s t , when ready to die, buys a pitch- fork; an opjtlmlsj. buys a h a r p and l e a r n s to play It. I knew a farmer in M i n n e s o t a who complained about tho d r y weather. » 1 pointed to some clouds on t h e horizon and said they surely must i contain r a i n . ' Rain ( b l a n k ) ! ' ho exclaimed, t h o s e are j u s t empties coming back from Iowa." What tho r a i l r o a d s want," he continued, " is more good fellowship, more b r o t h e r l y love." To show what he m e a n t ho told h ow Chas. Klltrell, an old f r i e n d of h i s, was late g e t t i n g home one night , audi his wife s e n t five t e l o g r a n i s of i n q u i r y 1 to five friends of his. P r e t t y soon t h e first answer came, s l a t i n g that C h a r l i e was s p e n d i n g the night, t h e r e. A little later Charlie came in himself with a d i s a b l e d flivver. Whilo Mrs. K i t t r e l l puzzled over this, four more t e l e g r a m s came in, s t a t i n g , " Y e s , Charlie is" s p e n d i n g the night, with me." That, said Mr. Flynn, was b r o t h e r l y love. GREAT NORTHERN OFFICIALS HERE GENERAL COUNSEL UPHOLDS ESCHCUMMINGS LAW AS GOOD SALINGER LOSES LIBEL SUIT Cornelius li. . Molamphy, 41 y e a r s of uge, died at a C h e r o k e e hospital on Monday, October 8. death caused by general p a r a l y s i s and a break- down in h e a l t h . Mr. Modamphy w a s b o r n In LoMars on December 7. 1881. He g r a d u a t ed from the LeMars high school In 18S9. After being born and raised in l, e Mars, and t w o y e a r s after his graduat i o n be went to Chicago, where ho engaged In work. He bus made several visits to LeMars slnco being In Chicago. For two y e a r s be was secr e t a r y of t h e American Writing Paper Company at llolyoke, Mass. lie stifle re'd a break- down in health two y e a r s « go, which lie never recovered. The funeral was held this morning at 9 o'clock from Wiltgen's I'ndcrt n k i n g parlor to t h o St. J a m e s clinch, and buriul made in t h e Catholic cemetery. Mr. Molamphy leaves to mourn his loss his beloved wife, one s i j t e r , Mrs. M. 1!. Redmond of LeMars and t h r ee b r o t h e r s , Philip and George of Sioux City and Roger at Quinn, S. I). Mr. and . Mrs. J o e S t e w a r t of Omaha, former Plymouth county people, will leave soon for California for an extended visit. PLANT WIZARD PACKS EGGS FOR T H E W H I T E HOUSE BREAKFAST TABLE At t h e P e t a l u i n a ( Calif.) National Egg Day c e l o b r u t l o n , Luther Burbank, tho c e l e b r a t e d plant wizard, p a c k e d a special gift case of super- fresh extra- fancy eggs for P r e s i d e n t a n d Mrs, Coolldge. F a i l s to Get Damages From Des 1 Moines Editor Des Moines, la., Oct. 11.— Ben I. S a l i n g e r , formur Justice of t h e Iowa s u p r e m e court, lost h i s llbol suit for $ 10,000 damages against, former Sena t o r Lafayette Young, editor of t he Des Molnos Capital, in d i s t r i c t court hero today. Judgo F r a n k l i n declaring t h a t verdict for t h e defendant be r e t u r n e d . Senator Young, In - an. editorial pubtl Jfstied i n Fehoruray, Hdil, stated - Jhat 1 Salinger, then s e r v i n g as a member of t h e s u p r e m o court, bad uttonded a commilleo m e e t i n g of t h o s t a t e legi s l a t u r e and u r g e d that tho c o m m i t t ee members recommend for p a s s a g e a bill providing for in i n c r e a s o in t he number of s u p r e m e court judges. T h e s e n a t o r asked that the legislature t a k e ' n o such action, ami urged the judges to " get to w o r k " instead. J u d ge S a l i n g e r denied that he a t t e n d e d the committo meeting or urged any such a c t i o n as s t a t e d by S e n a t o r Young. In his suit, the j u d g e hold t h a i he haiUbeen damaged. After taking of defense testimony for two days, a t t o r n e y s I'm; Senator Young asked that, the case be dismissed. Judgo F r a n k l i n ordered the j u r y to r e t u r n a d i r e c t e d verdict and said that, his o r d e r was in line with a r e c e n t state- supremo court opinion on t h e libel laws of Iowa. HEALTH HINTS ON PAGE THREE If Read, May Avoid Illness In t he Coming Winter Tho Globe- Post is publishing reg u l a r l y some " H e a l t h Hints,,, which may he very helpful to ' i t s r e a d e r s. If the r e a d e r will t u r n to page three and give tho h e a l t h hints a o n c e o v er p e r h a p s It will be very valuable in the near future. Tim Commercial club banquet Tuesday night was a " r a i l r o a d evening." Officials of t h e Great Northen railroad, which passes through Dalton, were the guests, including N, L. Countryman, vice p r e s i d e n t and general counsel, F. II. Livingston, assist a n t s u p e r i n t e n d e n t nf t h e Sioux City d i v i s i o n : P. F, Keating, general sup e r i n t e n d e n t of t h e e a s t e r n d i s t r i c t; P. If. I l u r n h a n i , g e n e r a l freight a g e n t; T. F. Flynn, director of ptibllc rel a t i o n s ; and T. W. F l a h e r t y , station agent at Dalton. The principal speaker of t h e evening was Mr. C o u n t r y m a n , and h i s subject was I lie Kseh- Cummlns transport a t i on act, which has been under sev e r e fire since its adoption in cong r e s s . Mr. Countryman r e m a r k e d that t hn r a i l r o a d s , as soulless corporations, had a p p a r e n t l y Incurred the dlsllko to t h e m a s s of t h e people, although t h e railroads are t h o g r e a t e s t single s e r v a n t t h a t t h o puople have, lie s a id the. r a i l r o a d s have been t r y i n g b a r d to give good s e r v i c e w i t h o u t paying a ny a t t e n t i o n to w h e t h e r the people realized It or not, nnij tho people have . c o n s e q u e n t l y heard only t h o sldn of t h o politicians. Now the- railroads have come to reall/. o what a formida b l e thing an aroused public cons c i o u s n e s s Is, a n d t h e y a r e h a s t e n i ng to present, t h e i r side of t h e c a s e. Out Of Chaos T h e speaker briefly enumerated t h e main points of tins Esch- Cummlns law. which, ho said, lifted tho railr o a d s out of c h a o s Into o r d e r ; out o t a niultpllcity of c o m m i s s i o n s and s n a r l e d - u p political tangles into t ho s y s t e m a t i c and very public management of t h e I n t e r s t a t e Commerce commission. I n s t e a d of allowing tho r a i l r o a ds to combine as they pleased, mani p u l a t e ratos as t h e y pleased, build and abandon lines us they pleased, t h o Eseh- Cummlng l aw p u t s t h em under strict governmental control. T h e y a r e not allowed to e a r n more five and - t h r o o q u a r t e r s per t h o u g h this does not bother much, being more than the of t h em can e a r n anyway, T h e vailrouds t h e m s e l v e s do not like all t h e g o v e r n m e n t a l r e s t r i c t i o ns Imposed upon them, but t h e y a r e willing to put, u p w i t h t h em b e c a u s e ot tlie fact that it e n a b l e s t h e m to do b u s i n e s s much more efficiently. Mr. Country m a h spoke bitterly Lagalnst " r a d i c a l p o l i t i c i a n s , " sutlb, a s , Ilrbffkhart, whose solo object accordi n g to him, is t o o l e v a t o t h e m s e l v es by t e a r i n g down. All o v e r the country, said the s p e a k e r , men a r o b e i np sent to c o n g r e s s oh t h e s t r e n g t h of t h e i r promise to ' ' s m a s h the- railr o a d s . " If t h e r e a r e enough nf t h em t h e y will succeed in doing this, a nd if they smash the r a i l r o a d s they will smash the c o u n t r y , which grew up around, t h e r a i l r o a d s and which would go hack again to i t s o r g i u a l s t a t e It' tho r a i l r o a d s were smashed. Community Songs F. A. Horner was c h a i r m a n . Short, a d d r e s s e s were made by Guy S l r u h l o, T. F. Flynn, and a n u m b e r of o t h e r s. Illll Koenlg was yell leader for t ho community singing, aud " Sweet". Adeline" was h a r m o n i o u s l y rendered. Miss Aloysius Wasmer and Mrs. Glenn Winders sang vocal solos that, were much appreciated. Crowley's o r c h e s t r a played while supper was being served. A l e t t e r from Moso Reed was r e a d. Mr. Reed expressed bis willlngnosss to lead t h e b a n d next year. Tho Wedn e s d a y night bargain day w a s mentioned, to he fought out a t leisure among the r e t a i l e r s. t h an cent. t h em most J u d g e Newby To Speak J u d g e Miles W. Newby of t h e Wood, bury county district court In Sioux City Is to deliver an a d d r e s s at Le Mars, in tho F i r s t Congregational church on Sunday, October 21 one week from next Sunday. Ills sub; j e c t will be " The C o n s t i t u t i o n ami Americanism". The o c c a s i o n of J u d ge Newby's coming t  Ear corn " 8 o u ls Ilarlev - i~> DAIRY PRODUCTS d a i ry p a c k i n g stock Mutter, flutter. Cream 40 28 . 1 1 I t ivy '- c„ v • leavy ' . l g h t Hens I'Ol. U ' l'R v • springs . 1 4 o n a .16 s te Kggs, cash 27, t r a d e 28 H l b r i S , Wi. OL AXVD i ^ r . nV Hides, no. 1, g r e e n 06 Hides, No. 2, g r e e n 05 Wool, fine S5- 40 Wool, m e d i um S0- S5 Wool, coarsn Tallow No. I-- 60 Tallow No, 1.- 4*  

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