Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Floyd Valley News Newspaper Archive: October 1, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Floyd Valley News

Location: Lemars, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Floyd Valley News (Newspaper) - October 1, 1962, Lemars, Iowa                                Tno. 79 LE MARS, IOWA.. MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1962 e 1963 models of the two t popular makes of cars, and Chevrolet, were un- J today in dealers' show-j throughout the country, developed the expected e interest. . Mars dealers Gordon Ian and Dwayne Grotewcld i entertained gratifyingly e crowds during the morn-and afternoon, serving cof- and doughnuts to the am of serious and casual wers who thronged in to see numerous 1963 models they ' on display. ost of the new cars the dealers displayed today ,e already been sold, they rted; advance sales of the models in the local area running ahead of the deal- �' experience in other recent [School's Out; Teachers Study Flans Drive � in e Building Here Robert W. Utech, agent of doctors and so on could, if they the Bankers Life of Iowa, has had drive-in space, pick ur> i announced   the   purchase   of more business. I want to build 1 land at the intersection of 6th j an office building to prove it." 1   wmv\- ~~ Ave SW and highway 75 south |   Mr. Utech plans to build offer  the  construction  of  Le- lices of ultra modern design Mars' first drive-n office build-1 and decorate them as ing. he supply of new models on play, too, is far more genus. Older motorists recalled time, not many years ago, n the local dealers could "age to obtain only one or of the new year's models ^opening day display. Things ye sure changed in tenjfearsj ' agreed. * .. [ *     .-' MOTOR CO.' . DISPLAY NEW SES TUESDAY ...e 1963 family of Dodge "sand trucks will go on dis-y for the general public esday, Oct. 2, at Neisius otor Co. in Le Mars, Plym-th county's Dodge and Chrys-r dealer. "We will be open Tuesday lit 9 p.m. for the showing," erle Neisius said, "and will so serve free coffee and do ts from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and to 4 p.m. We sincerely hope   stopping motor vehicle  highway. Charge made "Pt. 20 by Highway Patrol St. W. Sober, 2% miles south ' Le Mars. supply business, for the past 40 years, working the Northwest Iowa, Southeast Dakota and Southern Minnesota territories, says he is getting a bit old to continue juggling those 100-pound sacks, so has decided to ease-up a little, although he will continue for the time being to care for the wants of his longtime feed customers on a parttime basis. The balance of his time will be devoted to efforts in the field of investments. With Mr. Null's large acquaintance over the Northwest territory and in Le Mars, he will be in an excellent position to advise his many Iowa friends and customers concerning their investment problems. Al feels pai'ticuarly fortu-have made a conncc- >. sibux City, over j^-pho^gactio-n report at. three years, died Thursday at-]fho Fn,lps club here. ter several years of illness. CAR-TRACTOR CRASH ON NO. 7 SUNDAY-NO SERIOUS INJURIES I Mr. and Mrs. Farling Opdahl i of Ireton escaped serious in-1 jury late Monday afternoon when their car collided with a farm tractor a mile and a quarter south of the intersection of highways No. 7 and No. 3 and 5, ten miles west of Le Mars. The mishap was investigated by Highway Patrolman Rich-jard LuiUr-ns, who imported that jthe collision took place about j5:30 p.m. as both the car and tractor, pulling a wagon, were j going north. i   The tractor was driven by El-i mor Brown of Merrill, who had ibeon helping his son, Kenneth j cut silage. He began a left turn |and the Opdahl's 1959   Ford j struck the left rear wheel of the tractor headon, caving in the front of the car and knocking the tractor    tire off the j wheel, the patrolman said, j   Mr. Oprlahl suffered a punc-1 ture cut beneath his chin, an,d his wife, head and jaw bruises. Their young daughter,   riding in the rear seat, escaped   injury'. He had farmed in Sioux county until retiring to Le Mars in 19118. Mr. Worcester had resided on 3rd Ave. SW until moving to the nursing heme. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Mauer's funeral home. Rev. Alvern Kin-radc of the First Baptist church will officiate.    Burial the Eagles club here Reports were given on prog-rest of milk meetings and the effect plans on grain storage have had. The meeting was closed with a discussion period. Thursday was Plymouth county d a y at the Sioux City stockyards. Observation on the north end unloading shute be urch will officiate.    Buna j ^   ^ hours Qf 2 tQ ,, will be in Pleasant H l U ceme ximately 97 head of cat- tery, Ireton. ,     weighing 800-1100 pounds, Mr. Worcester was born May Ue        � 26,  1878. in Sioux county!T 4^ . ... *,*v near Ireton, the son of the late Frederick   and Julia   Taylor Worcester.  His  marriage   to Sarah Hardacrc took place December 24, 1900, at Wakonda, , S. D. She died in 1958. |   Surviving are two dauehters. nate to have macte a connec-i Mrs. Francis (Violet) Wood of .ion with a company that has j Brookings. S. D. and Mrs. Mike the background and personnel \ (Marian) Johnson of Le Mars: nf ihn most j a grandson, Jerry Johnson   of Wor of Gains. Some of the ' " - great-gr,nd prominent successful bisms^ brother> Hcnry men in Iowa arc the 'ounfisj Minnesota. and associates of Gams. -     an Iowa company and the shares are sold only to bona fide residents of Iowa who purchase for long-term investment. At the present time, several thousand Iowa Investors have - 1  ----.V Hnins 'MCI   in in............. Preceding him in death were a grandson, Larry Johnson, several brothers and sisters. STORY HOUR AT LIBRARY TO BEGIN SATURDAY Special. - The story hour again Satur- thousand Iowa In shown their confidence in Gains!  Special - me muiy by investing their surplus funds iwnich has been a popular tea-in these shares, making Gains Iture at tne Horary Oak room one of the fast growing companies in the field of finance. Since October of 19G1, Gains has taken title to prime commercial property costing over $3,500,000 under lease to tenants that are big names in commerce, including Wool-worth, Safeway. Motorola, Super Valu, Clark's-Gamhle, Spartans and National Tea, all with assets in the millions of RTHUR MtLCZAREKS P VERONA, ITALY, �SITING HERE Special - Mr. and Mrs. Ar-jiw Milczarek and three chil-'ren, Mary Ann, Elizabeth and 'chael of Verona, Italy, are S�ests in the home of Mrs. Milczarek's sister and her hus-tand, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Koopmann. Mrs. Milczarek was the for-mer Jean Freyman, a daugh-, h of Mrs. Freyman and the Gains expert real es ate ^ Vincent Freyman of Chi-1 ^ are daily evaluating ""*- anay nrnnerties.   Nu- cago. Mf- and Mrs. Milczarek spent two years at Heidelberg, Germany, before going to Italy a year ago. Mr Milczarek is deputy cWef of civilian personnel headquarters, South European Task force. for several years will be featured beginning day at 2:30 p.m. Pre-school, kindergarten, and children in grades one to four are welcome to attend. At the Hospital Admitted Thursday at Sacred Heart hospital: Mrs. Johann Miller, Marcus; Ed Ruch, Kingsley; William H. Kounkel, Le Mars. Dismissed: Mrs. Mike Lud-wig and daughter, Remsen; Mrs. James Callfas, Le Mars. commercial properties. Numerous Iowans have already invested millions   in   Gains stock and more people are buy------ ing Gains securities every full particulars. They will be day. under no obligation as they are Mr. Hull invites his friends to be the sole judge whether and acquaintances, plus any or not the Gains plan will fit others to call or write him for into their Mure ing 300-700 pounds, county NFO .members report. Truckers reported they are working less hours than ever before clue to the high price of feeders and loss of business during the holding action. NFO members said there are not many truckers at the yard s, One NFO checker reported loads of hogs were being exchanged for loads of fat cattle, goings from one stockyard to another. Packing house   workers report their kill is around 50 per I cent below normal, j  During the   holding action. , NFO members have learned who    their    neighbors    and friends really are. It has been noted   that   several   business firms and farmers in Plymouth county are working    against the family-type farms and the nation by shipping their livestock just to line their own pockets, according to the NFO. They say they need the money but the NFO commented there are thousands of NFO farmers who are on the verge of losing their farms and are holding livestock off the market trying to get a fair price so they can stay on the farm. President   Kennedy   said: "It's not what the country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." Farmers in the NFO are trying to solve their own problems without the help of the government  with restrictions and controls, coun ty NFO officers said. Listen to Phil Allen, NFO re-(Sm NFO, PaBe 71 ROGER TYLER TO OPEN STYLIST SALON HERE IN BRAUCH BUILDING New Business To Open Monday Roger Tyler, Sioux City hair dresser who has won trophies in seven midwestern states, will open a beauty salon here in the former American Trust and Savings bank building owned by P. A. Brauch Mr. Tyler has won awards for daytime and fantasy styling and hair cutting. The Tyler Stylist Salon will open Monday, Oct. 1, in the downstairs offices formerly occupied by Dr. Peter Schumacher, optometrist. Mr. Tyler said all equipment and walls will be decorated in Fifth Avenue orchid. Mr. Tyler began work- as a hairstylist in 1959 at Sioux Falls. He has since been manager of the Sunset Plaza Salon and an instructor at Stewart's School of Hairstyling, Sioux City. Mrs. Tyler is the former Leila Nitzschke of Remsen. The couple was married in July. Also a beauty operator, Mrs. Tyler operates the Tyler Terrace Salon in Sioux City. Her mother Mrs. Paul Nitzschke is employed at Stevens Cleaners here. The Tyler Stylist Salon will be open from 9 a.m. to 6:3* p.m., Mr. Tyler said. The Tylers will continue to make their home in Sioux City. KURT H. PETERS, Bismarck,   N.   D.,   addresses school administrators at the Tri-County   institute.   Information and education manager for the Montana-Dakota | Utilities   Co.,   Mr.   Peters spoke on "The Blessings of Liberty"   at  the  afternoon general session.   A native of Germany, he is the holder of one of five D.A.R medals given to outstanding naturalized citizens. Late Bulletin BOB WELLS INVOLVED IN MOTORCYCLE MISHAP Bob Wells, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Wells, Le Mars, was the operator of a motorcycle involved in a collision with a car at 4 p.m. Friday. Police said the accident occurred at Van's Motel corner, highway 75 and 5th Ave. SW., Early reports were that the motorcycle collided with a car broadside and young Wells was thrown over the top of the automobile. Bob suffered a gash on the top of the head and bruises. SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS and teachers from Plymouth, Cherokee and Woodbury counties were in Le Mars Friday for the annual Tri-County Teachers institute. Conferring at one of the morning discussion groups, from left, are Mike Caviness, Cherokee school principal: Vance Stead and Orval Nielsen, secondary and elementary principals of Le Mars Community schools, and Burdette Hansen, superintendent of the Marcus school. Schools throughout the three counties were closed for the day, with the exception of Sioux City. B.P.W. GUEST NIGHT SET TUESDAY NIGHT AT LIBRARY OAK ROOM Le Mars Business and Professional   Women's club has issued invitations^- for-  t;h^� i r annual guest night to be held Tuesday, Oct. 2, at the library Oak room. Guests will De entertained with a program and refreshments. The guest night precedes the local club's observance of National Business Women's Week , Oct. 7 to 13. The week is sponsored by the National Federation of Business and Professional Women, Inc CAR-TRUCK CRASH AT INTERSECTION Robert MaComb, Le Mars, was traveling north in a 1949 Ford pick-up truck and Larry Fiedler, Le Mars,, was east-bound ^rr;ath'St.-|ri a 1&53 OldsmobHe.    \V   ' Damage to a car and pickup truck amounted to over $160 after a collision at 9:10 a.m. Friday at the intersection of 2nd Ave. and 8th St. SW. Right side damage to the Oldsmobile, owned by Ray Fiedler, totaled $98.50. Front end damage to the truck amounted to $73.50, police reported. Fines Fines in two state cases have been paid in mayor's court. Edith Mugge, Cleghorn, $12, speeding. Charge made Friday by Highway Patrolman Richard Helmers, 3 miles south of Le Mars. Eugene O. Vander Hamm, route 2, Ireton, $9, no chauffeur's license. Charge made .Wednesday by Highway Patrol-jman Wilson. 23 TEAMS OF LOCAL BUSINESSMEN BEGIN LE MARS FOR WESTMAR DRIVE FOR $13,000 Twenty-three teams of busi nessmcn from Le Mars began railing for the "Le Mars for Wpstmar" campaign Wednos day. The annual campaign will continue until Oct. 3. The teams are confident and ready to reach the $13,000 goal. College  officials are optimistic,  as  first letters returned $2,735 in cash and $290    in pledges. Team members are: R. W. Parker    and A. M. Forsbcrg, Gordon Mennen and Norris Hawkins. T.vndall Powers and George Vander Tuig. Bud G^rke, Wendell Bny-i lan and Roger Sieverding, Leo I Flaherty and Gus. Wetrosky, George Wolbers and Arie Bom-Mars, Burton Dull and   Paul Olson. DaiWl Ketelsen and Chuck Wiley, Clyde Eastman and C. L. Hagen. Gordon Whelan and Richard Pew, Jean Koenig and Hol^n WHtffon. William Pew and John Ale sch,    Jack Harmon and Don Stevens.    P. A. VanderMeer and Gordon Tontinger,   J i m Bowers and Bob Pearson John Vollmar, O. E. Fristad and C. W. Down, Al Becker, Robert Roseberrv and Rudy Adler, Dwayne Grotewold and Al Maser, Fred Veale and Harold Harms, Robert Collins and Fay Wells. T V Man In Hawaii Praises Gunther  Prices in Randall's big first of the week ad today are good Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Check the ad for early week specials. (Harry   Kalas  Jr.,   son  of Westmar college President and Mrs. H. H. Kalas, is now sports director  of   KTRG  television station, Honolulu, Hawaii. Following is the letter received from him by the Daily Sentinel, with his comments about Dave Gunther, former Le Mars high school and State University of Iowa basketball star, who is trying for a berth on the professional San Francisco Warriors basketball team.) To the Editor: The Los Angeles Lakers and the San Francisco Warriors are here in the islands for an exhibition series in preparation from the coming NBA season. I have had a chance to spend a great deal of time with our mutual friend, Dave Gunther, who is making a bid to become a member of the S.F. Warriors I thought you might be inter ested in Dave's progress, the series itself, and his chances of sticking with the Warriors. The Lakers won the series, i taking three out of four, but| not without a real struggle. Elgin Baylor is everything they! say he is and more. More pertinently, Dave was very impressive in the four games. While playing only about a quarter in each game, the Hawkeye flash scored in double figures two out of the four games. He is very happy with the i Warriors and has a great attitude. The affable and modest Dave is well-liked by his teammates and the feeling seems to be mutual. When I asked Dave about Wilt Chamberlain he could speak only in superlatives about the 7' 1" wonder. Coach Bob Fcerick had this to say about Dave and his chances: "Dave has looked as good as any of our rookies thus far. His chances are as good as any of the rest of them in making our ballclub. Dave is an excellent shooter." Actually, his statements were pretty non-commital, but this is Mr. Feerick's first year as the Warrior coach and he's had a chance to see his men in only the four games here, so he explained that he could not give a more conclusive answer. So, let's keep our fingers crossed. It's my humble opinion that Dave is one of the top rookies on the Warriors and will make the ballclub. I certainly hope so. i  I just thought you might be I interested in Dave's situation 'with the NBA club. He's enjoying his stay here in the islands very much. My best to Mr. Batman and the Meises who have had the opportunity to visit here . . . if anyone else from that area is planning a visit here, please feel free to call me. I shall be more than happy to do anything that I can for you. Aloha, Harry Kalas.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication