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Jefferson Bee: Wednesday, February 11, 1931 - Page 1

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   Jefferson Bee (Newspaper) - February 11, 1931, Jefferson, Iowa                                 The Jefferson Bee  GREATER CIRCULATION THAN ANY OTHER TWO PAPERS IN GREENE COUNTY  VOL. 64  JEFFERSON, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1931  • . ' ' íifí  SEASONABLE SERMONS  WRITTEN BY V. H. LOVEJOY  Some ThouKhti Upon Topics Which Are Very Much Alive in America at Present.  Qld Andy Mellon, of Washington, D. C., is a muchly cussed old cuss. Andy looks after national finances, and he does it in a business-lilce manner, with a view to conserving the money of the people. Be it known that last September 1, he issued a call for a large bunch of Liberty Bonds, upon which th'sre was an option of paymeAt the coming March lat. Under the law, Andy had to serve notice upon owners of these bonds of intention to call them, six months in advance. His plan was a wortiiy one. He expected to pay a part of the bonds, and then issue short time certificates at about 3 per cent or less, to take up the balance and thus cut interest rates from 4% to 8 or less. ' The scheme was one of wisdom for the taxpayers.  However Andy did not foresee the coming of the "lame duck" Congress, with its attendant unfriendliness. This body is infested with a bunch of men, including republican insurgents and democrats, who do not propose that Andy shall have any glory whatever from putting over a finance scheme that would greatly reduce interest, and, incidentally, help his record of paying at least a billion of the war debt each year. No, they intend to throw as many monkey wrenches into the cylinders of Andy's financing machinery as they can—and they are doing it.  So a bill has been prepared to take up the bonus insurance certificates of World War soldiers—not due until 1945—and pay them cash totaling about three and a half billion dollars. To do this would absolutely ruin Andy's financing plans, and doubtless would cause him to have to re-issue bonds at not less than iV* per cent, or possibly more. But there is strong support of such a plan in the House of Lords, at Washington, where the key idea seer|is to be to "lay on Mac-Duff" no matter who gets hit by the bludgeon. The main effort is to discredit the administation in every way possible, no matter how worthy may be finance arrangements.  Of course there is an appeal to many people in a scheme to pay money to World War soldiers. It looks like a good vote getting argument, but is it 7 Pacts are, right now. World War soldiers are extensively engaged in hushiess, and any sort of big payments is going to fall heavily upon those who fought in the war. At this time ^the proposal to pay these certificates t havé «1 heavy adverse effect  when all business is in a serious de pression. Folks who are hoping for early recovery of economic conditions fear, and well they may, any hug« governmental expenditure that may plunge us still deeper into business troubles.  No one wishes to be "stingy" with soldiers who fought our wars. It is just and proper that those who are in dire need, or sick and crippled by war ravages, should be looked after by a grateful people. But why swing wide open the doors of the Federal treasury and invite all World War veterans to help themselves, and particularly those whose deepest interest should be to help the country pull out of a bad financial rut.  Let us be reasonable along this war veteran line. Be it said that no government on earth ever paid adequately the men who went into battle. Men who work in dynamite plants draw up to $12 per day. If those who went into the war trenches faced even double the dangbr of a dynamite factory, they are entitled to $25 per day for every day of their front line service. What government can pay it, and what government ever did pay it' . '  How much real money does any nation owe soldiers of its wars ? Ixit us get down to brass tacks. Since nations first existed the young men have had to do the fighting, because it could not be done by women, children, or men in advancing years. So, war has been the unfortunate lot of the young men, say between the ages of 21 and 81 years. Whose fault is it? Surely not that of the people of their country. Wars have come and gone, and have had to be fought, and for reasons the ordinary man probably never knew.  So, let us state the facts. The young man who was between the ages of 21 and 31 when war broke out, faced a duty to fight for his parents, his younger brothers and sisters, for his home and for his neighbors who could not fight You may call it fighting for his nation, if you will, but, really, was it as much that, as for his family, his home, or father and mother's farm 7 Heally a "government" like the United States is a sort of nebulous thing anyway. Facts are the people are the government, themselves. The government is merely a plan of law and social order, made to protect humanity from death or slavery, to conserve land and town lot titles, schools, churches, and the individual possessions of the family as well as the son who took up arms.  Then, what do we really owe the young man who goes forth to battle 7 Do we owe money, or is ho doing an unpleasant duty which fell to him by reason of his age, and for which there is no adequate compensation? Shall we say it was just his "hard luck" to come of fighting age when a war was due 7 That's about the reol situation, and there is no other situation. It cannot be said, in view of all the facts, that money is really owed for war service. That a people owe the soldier undying gratitude there is no doubt, and the boys generally get the gratitude. It may not always be expressed in words, yet the gratitudeii»? there. And gratitude cannot be paid  in cash. God help any people who have an idea that it can.  As we stated above, a nation owes money to cripples, to the sick and to the afflicted of any way. And oft-times the crippled, and the tick, and afiicted by war, are not of army enrollment, and so cannot register for any-"bonus." W« who Stayed at home and worked oh thi farms to raise food, worked for the Red Cross and gave our money, made heavy home sacrifices to "win the war" are not considered in any government bill. And yet, every statesman admits that, but for the "home folks" and their efforts aiv^ sacrifices, the" soldiers could not have won on'the battle front. Let us think of these things when we are talking about "compensation."  A good many of the boys who went to war "lost out" in jobs and position. Whose fault? Nobody's. It fell to them by, reason of their "fighting age," by reason of their "misfortune" to be best able physically in 1917 and 1918. They "inherited" the bloody and disagreeable job at their age, and no one is to blame^ and need it be said also that their fighting was for parents, for their homes, for the things of value which belonged to those at home. Yes, it may have been for the "nation" too, but what is a nation but Barents and families of the fighters? Should a young man be paid for defending his family and home 7  To be sure there were those who "profited" by the war and came out wealthy. But, if we have to "pay" how much will that bunch pay? Some, undoubtedly, but of the great sum, comparatively little. In the grand shake-up the parents, and brothers and sisters, or relatives of the fighters, get the big end of the assessment.  • We know there were "profiteers," there have been in every war. The, reason they were with lis was because the Wilson administration did not have the "puts" to draft resources as well as men. As a result of this failure on the part of Congress we had those who made unholy profit out of world sorrow. However it is nice to know that scads of those devils lost their all when the New York stock market broke, or "blew it" in general gambling enterprises, as most gamblers do, and as most folks do who get easy money. Some of them still survive, but they are now a small part of the large gang who operated at the time.  Brookhart and other supporters of the "bonus cashing" enterprise use the argument that, as men profiteered in the war, let us now swing open the treasury doors and empty out the money with lavish hand. This, of course, is the application of the doctrine of "an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" a law that. the ■TOSB^rTSaWttWr«^^ - "to abolish without general success. The  PATON TAKES 'EM ALL  THREE GAMES IN ONE NIGHT  Huge Crowd at Armory Last Evening to Witness Some, Fast Basketball Gaines.  theory of righting one wrong by committing another wrong may sound all right to some in this time of economic flatulency, but no wrong ever made another wrong right.  The effect of such things can be seen by any student who reads up on family feuds of pro-Civil war days, when it was the rule to "pay back" each murder with another murder. It is needless to say that, if our "statesmen" continue this system in legislation this country is riding for a fall that will be permanent. The working out of the principle of revenge in legislation is exactly what we have in war, that of punishing a thousand innocent ones to where we hit one that is guilty. The heavy burden of huge expenditures will now fall very largely upon people who had nothing whatever to do with war profiteering, but whose blood of patriotism flowed as freely in their veins as it did in the veins of those who faced the cannon's mouth.  In this depressing time, when expenditures are already of a nature to "try men's souls," able bodied veterans of the World War should not seek to lay additional financial burdens upon the country. We should care for every soldier who • suffered physically by his war service, even in such times as these, and that is all the people should be expccted to do. There will come a time in the^years ahead when pensions for aged veterans will be as grand and as much in place, as the Civil war soldiers, but that time is not now. Yet the fact remains that every Conprress from this time forth will see proposed legislation to pension all World war soldiers, and engineered by politicians who expect to profit by votes. Soldiers of the World War, who are now taking their places in the business of the nation, and who will have the burdens of constantly increasing government expenditures, should see to it that reason shall rule, rather than to permit the climbing of public allowances to a point where taxes will be mountain high. For, remember, every nation that has fallen in thousands of years, fell by reason of a burden of taxes, and for no other reason.  • • •  Of course we know that, in this day of human injustice and woefully imperfect humanity, every young man owes it to his country's flag to defend it with his life, and that without any financial consideration. So The Bee man is frank enough to say, blessed is the country that asks men to live for it, and curses upon any nation that has nothing but death to offer in exchange for citizenship. We pass this on for the consideration of Congressmen and Scnotors who constantly oppose any plan to stop war b«-tween nations of the earth. Take it or leave it.  It was "Paton night" at the armory la&t evening when the high* school girls and boys basketball teams and the Paton Independents "licked the platter clean."  In the preliminary Contest tho Paton girls outplayed the lassies from Cooper, and had little trouble in winning 43 to 83. Paton had a lead, 26 to 13, at half time. The girls from Franklin township outclassed them in the third session 11 to 6, but Paton speeded up in the final session and kept a safe margin to the end.  In the main event—Paton and Jef-fersons boys—^the "jinx" which Paton has on the locals was in good working order and Paton ivon easily 31 to 11. The game was much harder fought than the score would indicate. Jefferson was unable to penetrate the defense put up by the boys from northeast Greene, and when they did" get a shot as the basket it went wide of the mark. Paton men "got behind" the Jefferson guards for many points. The locals scored but two free throws in the first half. ■ Paton led from the start and the count by quarters was;  Paton ....................7 9 20 31  Jefferson............2 9 11  The Paton boys and girls both play- j ed fast ball all during their games, j and deserved to win. A large crowd of fans from all towns in the county j was present to see the county scat, boys go down to defeat. The armory j was packed to tho limit, and it was i probably the largest crowd ever to j attend any game in Jefferson aside : from the finals in the county touma- ; ment.  The Paton Independents won from Headquarters company by a score of 40 to 2G, in a game which seemed to be slow in comparison to the high school contest.  The Jefferson team plays Carroll at Carroll on next Friday night. This is a Coon Valley conference game.  Jefferson 26, Nevada 23  In one of the most thrilling climaxes ever witnessed on the Jefferson floor the local high school basket ball squad defeated the Nevada squad by a count of 26 to 23, at the armory on last Friday night. The Nevada team started in the lead, and were going at a pace which seemed unstoppable, but Coach Leitch has several flghters in his outfit and they fight to the last whistle—and fight they had to. The visitors had the long end of an 8 to 6 count at quarter time and increased it to 17 to 9 at half time. The Jef-fenon lads went into the third quar? ter lWtK*^«^éterminBtíón 'to «shoot out" a victory, and outclassed their opponents 11 to 4 in the quarter, the count standing Nevada 21, Jefferson 20. The final quarter was o see-saw battle, each team leading at times, until in the final minutes of the fray Jefferson gained a three-point lead and kept it to the end. A team that can trail behind for the greater part of the game, when playing a team like Nevada, and then keep up the fight until victory is theirs, is good enough to represent any hffeh school. The Jefferson boys had hard luck in sinking shots during the first half, while Nevada was able to score on several shots from the enter of the floor. But that never-give-up spirit is hard to beat, and that is the spirit of the Jefferson boys. This was the eleventh consecutive victory for the wearers of the cardinal and black.  In the curtain-raiser the House of David and the Ladies Sewing Circle teams staged a burlesque that brought down the house. By a very unique system of counting the Sewing Circle won the fiasco by a score of 14 to 14, or maybe it was won by the be-j whiskered guys from the House of I David. These groups were coached by that superb trainer, Mr. Suck.  RED GROSS OVER TOP  DRIVE COMPLETED THIS WEEK  AH Sums for Southern Starving Should Be Turned in During This Week.  Lincoln's Letter to a Mother  On the walls of Brasenose College, Oxford University, England, this letter of the "Rail-Splitter" President hangs as a model of purest English, rarely, if ever, surpassed:  Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Nov. 25, 1864.  To Mrs. Bixby, Boston, Mass.  Dear Madam:  I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any word of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering you the consolation that maybe found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.  Yours very sincerely and respectfully,  A. Lincoln.  For a real loyal county to Red Cross work Greene county does not take a back seat in raising funds. While times are "tight" in this locality as well as elsewhere, generous hearted folks have met the .fiSOO assessment for Greene county with n gift of approximately $658.00. Wo always have those with us who xiiy "why raise more than they asked?" Weil, that's the way With our Reneroiis hearted folks of this region. Tho appeal by newspapers and radio for starving people of 21 slates mot with response here that is highly gratifying to Red Cross enthusiasts. Wo have not forgotten that, during tho stress of bonk failures, the Ked Cioss advanced a gift of $500 to keep the Red Cross health work going hero. Sometime we may face u terrific j storm disaster in this, a region of I tornadoes, and when wo do the National Ued Cross will be hero to do its part.  Another thing: Many regions have not been alile to raiso their quota on account of hard times. This is particiilnrly true in tho industrial cities, whore roliot work falling upon the pul)lic is very trroat. So, in Greene county, it is lino to know that we havo raised more than our (luota, for, i.y so doing, wo aro hi'lping Ihoso ill othor places whoro local cliai'ily is .so bunlonod llial the lied Cniss fiiiuls cannot lie I'lilly nu-t. .Several places have not yet reportod in fiinils, but it is hoped they will soiui in their i;ifts to county hoaihinarloi-s this week. No mattor if wo havo );oiio "ovor tho top," that is no n'ason for t;cnerous hearted folks to la« back, for tho need is groat. Unless coninuinities like (ireono county give moro llian is asked for tho drive for Ton niillioii will not 1)0 mot. Uomonihoi-, too. that ton million will not lie enough to soo folks thru until they can raiso another crop. So far Kift« in 'his county have been reported as follows;  W. E. Beazor.........................  W. S. Downes.......................  Goodrich Market .................  Dr. Buzard .............................  T. S. Pittman....................I...  Harry Lyon ...........................  Rev. Gans ..............  A. D. Brandt.........................  Mis. Turpon .  C. C. Iverson........................  Harding Girls .......................  Ralph Potter'............  R. P. Swan...........................  Z. D. Robison..........  D. Milligan Co..........  E. R. McCafTory . .  L. n. Kendall......................  Roy Wright ..*....................  Harold Thompson .  lion Ton................................  G. G. Frooman _______  W. K. ColToy.........................  Penney Co.......................  Dr. 0. K. Lyon..............  Rev. Hurroughs .............  U. Maurice .........................  J. J. C. Bower.........  .T. F. Shuey........................  1). W. Mugan...........  H. Walker ...........................  W. L. Ilarbaugh..............  Frank Kolloher ................  Presbyterian Church ("rril Presbyterian Friendly .....  G. F. (Iliorkamiier. ..  H. K. Smith...........................  Howard l^ittnian ................  F. W. Lorence.......................  1.00' 2.00 Í 1.00 I 2.00! 1.00; 1.00 I  100; Criminal News As It Has App  iTHE DISTRICT GO!  CLOSE OF JANUARY SÏ  in Court During the Past Few Days Here.  1.00 5.no 1.00  i.on ,  1 00 ! District court for the January !  I ended last Saturday. During' .j'oo 1 week several important easel 10 00 ' litigation were disposed of. i on : brought by L. Tronchetti ag 1 00 Jerald Flemming, in which the . o.on i tff asked vacation of ths White] ] 00 sandwich shop, was decided by ] 00 ! Hutchison in favor of the deferì 1^00 J"ry trial wherein H. J. Co ] (10 ^ brought action for damages for] 1 oo ing been knocked dov,Ti by one 1.00 Brunner trucks, and who a.sked a^os appio.ximating $P,,000, was Lilly $100 by tho jury. Crii) I cases were disposed of as fo!| Marion Stevens fined $500 for ing a car while intoxicated; liinRnor, of Grand Junction, on i ilar charge, was given $200 and i •Mgie Hess, who was chargcd lioot logging in two counts, was $Pi00 and given 90 days in jail, oij nimt, and on the other count ponded fine during good behavior.)  1.00 . 1.00 1.00 ; 2.00 1.00 .."}0 1.00 ¡ 1.00 R.TS 10.00 ' li.lH) 1.00  ] 00 three men named are serving tin i 00 t'lo county jail.  ORATORIGAL CONTEST  WEDNESDAY EVENING. FKH. 11  Will »0 Hold at the High Schoo (orioni in Jefferson at Eight O'clock.  Aiidi-  Tlio  county (loclaniatnry will ho held at tiie high scho( toriuni in .Tolforson at oi^ht evening, at which time  this  contc.st 1 audi-o'ciock chani-. (iivls-f each  FOR SALE !  I have what you want in farms, acreage, town property, business properties and some trade  for a first class mortgage. I also rent and collect. Mut. 50.  ORAOE WILOOX  Real Estate Agenoy fiOl SOUTH CHESTNUT ST.  Scranton Special  The members of the W. R. C., N. H. Powers Post No. 50 are invited to attend the American Legion Auxiliary unit 344 Americanism program and basket dinner to be held at tho noon hour of Thursday, February 12, at the Lion's club rooms. Each member of both organivations are to bring a basket dinner at the noonTiour and enjoy a very pleasane event following lunch. The Americanization program will be sponsored by the chairman committees, Mrs. Jennie Huff-manman, Mrs. Sarah Reed and Mrs. Mable Tesdahl.  The Emmanon club ladies met on Thursday afternoon with Mrs. Mabel Brown. After tho usual business session a pleasant afternoon with lunch concluded a social afternoon.  MrsT John MacDonald Sr. entertained the members of the Amigos club at her home in town Thursday afternoon. Business session. A dainty lunch was served.  A message was received by Mrs. A. P. Carl late Tuesday that her bro-ther, Everett BiUborough, died suddenly Monday evening at 10 p. m. at the National Military hospital at Saw-telie, California, from an operation for acute appendicitis. Funeral Services were held Friday with all military honors at Sawtelle, California, and burial took place in the National Military cemetery. Ho is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bils-borough, of Los Angeles, California, who were former residents of the Scranton vicinity. Many friends extend sympathy to members of his family in this hour of grief. Everett served six years in tho medical corps of dentistry and was in Panama, Balboa, Nicaragua and othor foreign countries up until his discharge from tho navy two years ago. He was just in the prime of life and was one of Greene county's noble sons.  Tho regular meeting of the W .R. C. of N. H. Powers Post No. 50 will be help on Saturday at 2:30 p. m. at the Masonic temple. All members of this organization are requested to be present.  RIG BIRTHOAY PARTY  W. R. C. AND G. A. R. MEMBERS  Picnic Dinner at I. O. O. F. Hall At Which a Special Program  Featured the Day.  t  The members of George H. Thomas Woman's Relief Corps No. 251, aiix-iliary to the Grand vArmy of the Republic, held a pl<mic'dinner last Saturday noon at the I. O. O. F. hall. This was one of the quarterly birthday parties honoring old soldiers, members of the W. R. C. and national war heroes. The tables were centered with hyacinths grown by the Corps' president, Mrs. Nettie Hays, who later gave them to sick members. Comrade Frank Lorence returned thanks at tho table. Following the dinner a program was given with Mrs. Edith Somers in the chair.     Jefferson ........................    ..............?:17,'').88      Grand Junction ............    .............. no.10      Rippey ............................    .............. 7(i.00      Paton ..............................    .r............ 42.00      Churdan ........................    .............. 39.00      Scranton ........................    .............. 34.00      Dana ..............................    .............. 11.00     Contributions on the part of the  Contributions on the part of the  Sarepta Wherry received gifts for their work of selling tickets. Mrs. Ernest Michael, who was present as an honored guest, gave a short talk. The charter was draped in memory of Mrs. Eva Morgan Smith of the local corps, and Mrs. Ida B. Martin, a past i Jefferson chapter were as follpws: national president who recently died in Minnesota. The corps voted to accept the invitation of Commander Timbrel and will meet henceforth in the Legion rooms, where the rent will b<».itee. .They voted toj extend thmr tVanks to the I, 0. O. P. and Beulah Ivebekahs for all courtesies extended them while meeting in their hall and for the use of their dishes.  Bristol Busy Bees  The Bristol Busy I3ees met at the home of their leader, Mrs. Dorothy Johnson Saturday, Jan. 31. The meeting was called to orler by the president, Mona Mitchell. "The minutes  tho secretary, Darlyne Johnson. The roll call was "Some Suggestions for The presiding officers of the various tlie Coming Year." For new business ^^ ^^ _ ^ ^ patriotic organizations were present | the president appointed the following : j,, : f;.,',,,!,]^  as special guests. Mrs. Hays extend -------------- '-------------.........  ed a welcome to these visitors on be  committees: Joyce Averill as song loader; Carmen Miller and Dori: half of the Corps, to which Guy j Brooker for the program conimittee Timbrel, commander of the Floyc Brown Post of American Legion Mrs. Henry Myers, regent of Inde pendence chapter of the D. A. R.  initiation committee. Six or moro new members are to be initiated at the next meeting. The new members aro: Pauline Mallet, Maisio Johnson,  Post of American Legion, and Mr Wm. Wehrli, president of the Service  Moster and Vivian Mumhy. Tliero wore thirteen old meniliors, six new  thanks for their invitation and ex pressed wishes for success of the W. R. C. in all their undertakings. Commander Timbrel extended an invitation to the W. R. C. ladies to meet in the Legion rooms at the armory any time they wished, as the Legion men  Star Legion, responded, voicing their , members, two vi.^itors and four  mothers present. Tho meeting was adjourned, after which Joyce Averill gave two readings, "His Room" and "The Old Trunnell Bod." Thimrs our club was to do this year was road by Mrs. Dorothy Johnson. Mrs. Wm. Mitchell gave a talk on the different  mil« «i.-iiv-ki, «.T HI*; iiiv .......v..... .................. — ..........- Mi's Dalsv Iio«n  had taken action to place their kitchen kinds of wall paper ami paint for "j. (¡'  and meeting room at their pisposal for any gathering.  Miss Eastlene Passell gave instrumental and vocal music. Miss DeWitt gave a reading. Comrade E. M. Troxell, who is 91 years of age, told of seeing Lincoln in IRfiH when he came to inspect the Army of the Potomoc. Comrade Troxell, Mrs. E. Delano, of the Rockwell City W. R. C., Mrs. Eva Head and Mrs. Mary Lock, of the Churdan W. R. C. gave short talks. Mrs. Edith Somers gave a biographical «ketch of Lincoln and Washington, as well as one of her original readings. Mrs. Hays reported that $52.50 had been added to the treasury of the corps as their shore of the money from the sale of tickets at the recent movie "Rivers End," sponsored by the corps a couple of weeks ago.  Mrs. Margaret Ganoo and  your bed room. Delicious refresh menas wore served by the four mothers.  The next meeting will be the home of Louise Ix^onard. girl is to bring a valentine.  hold at Each  Church of Christ Services next Sunday: Sunday school at 10 a. m. Morning worship at 11 a. m. Christian Endeavor at 6:30 p. m. Evening worship at 7:30 p. m. The choir will meet Friday evening this week for practice.  Ladies Aid will meet at the church Thursday afternoon.  Every department of the church is growing. Come, find a place in the service you will enjoy.  —Rummage price on ladies fur trimmed winter coats |4.95 at Downes Miss & Mayer's.  Along the Concrete  füß 6a3Pf^ts.s^s^kE,«ENl^y,vouJu$r  MK(EP lllTilNû1ilATm)CK.Py INCHES.'WIIAl" Ait youi^^ HOT PRIVINO.  ^üZuvm^ cJne imuùH 1ÍI0SB  PS7I tí^Ptt iTOfPep vcw ANP ALM^fôîASfllNô'NTH  initiation committee. Six or moro new members are to be initiated at the next meeting. The new members aro: Pauline Mallet, Maisio Johnson,  Moster and Vivian Mumhy. Tliero wore thirteen old meniliors, six new  Star Legion, responded, voicing their , members, two vi.^itors and four  mothers present. Tho meeting was adjourned, after which Joyce Averill gave two readings, "His Room" and "The Old Trunnell Bod." Thimrs our club was to do this year was road by Mrs. Dorothy Johnson. Mrs. Wm. Mitchell gave a talk on the different  your bed room. Delicious refresh menas wore served by the four mothers.  The next meeting will be the home of Louise Ix^onard. girl is to bring a valentine.  hold at Each  —Rummage price on ladies fur trimmed winter coats |4.95 at Downes Miss & Mayer's.     Knights of Columbus.................    . 10.00      Jesse E. Flack.............................    .$ B.OO      J. W. Fowler...............................    . 2.00      J. W. Huntington.......................    . 2.00      Mr. and Mrs. Will 1. Lyon.......    . 5.00      Pat Dunphy ...............................    . 5.00-■      W. R. Porterfield.......................    .. 1.00      Mrs. C. Oppenheimer..................    .. 2.00      E. L. Henderson.........................    .. 2.00      C. P. Lyon and wife...................    . 2.00      B. E. Morden...............................    . 2.00      Mrs. Tillie Houver.......................    . 1.00      Bee Pub. Co..................................    . 5.00      Jefferson State Bank...................    . 2.'').00      Mrs. James Andrew...................    . 1.00      Harry Harding ...........................    . n.oo      Northwestern Boll Tel. Co........    . 10.00      Walter H. Smith.........................    . 1.00      D. A. R..........................................    . .'i.OO      Chas. Martin ...............................    . 1.00      W. W. Price.................................    . 1.00      Ed Gamble ..................................    . n.oo      .Service Star ...............................    . 5.00      Mr. and .Mr;;, Arnold Koch.......    . 12.65      Mrs. Sadie Dick...........................    . 5.00      Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Wilson.......    . 5.00      J. J Brunner ...............................    . 5.00      Mrs. John Doyle...........................    . .25      Jessie E. Sayers...........................    . 2.00      Thora Elleby ..............................    .. 1.00      Bon C. Hamilton.........................    .. 1.00      F. W. Ruliffson and family.......    .. 2.00      Dr. Jongewaard .........................    ,. 5.00      Thora Hanbery ...........................    .. 2.00      Delta Kappa .............................    . 2.00      Grace Wilcox ............................    ,. 1.00      J. H. Dillavou...............................    ,. 1.00      W. 1). Washburn...........................    . 1.00      M. E. Industrial.......................    . .'i.OO      Culture club .............................    .. .'■>.00      Mrs. Daisy Do«n.........................    .. 5.00      Dr. S. G. Barker........................    .. :!.oo      C. E. Crooks.................................    .. 2.00      E. H. Carter.................................    .. 2.00      Mrs. O. G. Wynkoop...................    .. 1.00      R. A. Morris...............................    .. 1.00      Miss Ainsworth ...........................    .. 1.00      Mrs. JM. Auaborger....................    .. 1.00      Mrs. M. i'^. Adkinson..................    .. 1.00      R. 0. Orr......................................    .. 2.00      F. E. Gamble..............................    .. 1.00      J. M. Bell....................................    . 2.00      Mary Cook ..................................    .. 1.00      Mrs. Jas. Hutcheon..................    .. 1.00      Herald ..........................................    .. 5.00      Mrs. Shipman ............................    .. 1.00      Mrs. S. C. Judy..........................    .. 3.00      0. W. Stream..............................    .. 2.00      lown State Bank........................    .. 15.00      Rotary Club ................................    10.00      S. J. Melson................................    .. 5.00      Mrs. A. Oberkamper..................    .. 1.00      Ministerial Union ......................    .. 5.00      Mrs. Gronlid ..............................    .. 1.00      W. G. Howard ............................    .. 5.00      Percy Gray ................................    .. 3.00      A. E. Colo....................................    .. 2.00      A. D. Barrett..............................    . 1.00      W. E. Thomas..............................    .. 1.00      Ingleside Club ...........................    .. 2.00      Robt. W. Swick..........................    .. 2.00      i.ion's Club ..................................    .. 15.00      P. E. 0.........................................    ... 2.00      August Mesward........................    1.00      Maymo Wise ..............................    ... 2.00      Verna Lawton ..........................          Mr. Hess ....................................    .."iO      Beta Tau Delta Sorority.........    . 5.00      Margaret Fuller club.................    .. 2.00      Einil Messer ...........................    .. 2.00      T. G. Calvert........................    . 1.00      C. R. Thomas.............................    1.00      Judd Johnson ............................    ... 1.00      E. G. Graham............................    ... 2.00      Velma Reese ..........................    .50      Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Culbertson.    ... 2.00      Mrs. Alice Nath.........................    ... ;!.oo      Henrv Myers ...........................    ... 2,00      W. H. Hamilton........................    ... 1.00      C. F. Jefforis...............................    .., 1.00      R. C. Smith.................................    ... 1.00      D. E. Finch.................................    ... 1.00      W. M. Osborn.............................    ... 1.00      Bert Myers ...............................    ... 1.00      Margaret Flanagan .................    ... 1.00      John E. Miller............................    .. 1.00      Cleve Barr ..................................    ... 1.00     on weri  —Now is the time /or hooked rugs. New patterns at The Harding Shop.  pions will be selected in thro ions. The roiiresentativos i department were selected in recent contests at Rippey an<l Dana, and, this evening a cup will be awarded to tho chool winning the largtst number of i at present ten prisoners at the  Tom Ciimmings, 19 years of| was arrested the other day on eh of maintaining a liquor nuisance.j boy was found in possession of ' (lallons of boozo, two of rye and o| alcohol. Ile entered a pie Kuilty before Judge Klinker, l'iiiirt bore monday evening, sontenced to throe months in ja "hard labor" and to pay a fine ^ —or lay it oiit. He is now on jol) at tho county bastile.  I.elioy Beckner, aged 13 yearsJ seni to tiio reform school at Eldoi JuiIko Klinker last evening. was guilty of passing bad che two iipon Chas. Battlea and one Vincent Léonard, in the sums ofi ?4 and $5.60.  Sheriff l'"os3 Davis is entertaii  points at the hands of the judges. The judges selected for the occasion are; Misses Ruth Harris and Eloise Harvey, of Boone, and Harry Bur-meister, of Perry. The program for the evening ia as follows:  Prelude..........................H. S. Orchestra  Oratorical »  Masterful Man for the Ages............  ......................Pauline Calvert, Paton  The March of the Dead....................  ....................Paul Cameron, Scranton  The Unkown..........................................  ....................Chas. Garrels, Jefferson  In Memory of Our Heroic Dead ...  ........................Harold Magner, Dana  Dramatic  The Alien................................................  ............Marguerite Ferril, Jefferson  The Finger of God............................  ______..'..........Irene Stewart, Scranton  The Show Must Go On....................  ............................Mildred Stine, Dana  The- Bishop's Candlesticks..............  ....................Margaret Ryberg, Paton  Humorous  Lipsing Tommy's Agent Cure........  ..........................Blano Coburn, Dana  The .'Xbandoned Elopement................  ................Dorothy DeWitt, Jefferson  Jimmy Jones Studies Geography....  ............Evelyn Hendricks, Scranton  Ma at the Races................................  ........Frieda Tucker, Grand Junction  Music............Jefferson M. S. Orchestra  Suhl  "Drav  Presbyterian Church  Tho choir will offer special music at the vesper services in the future. Tho plan is for each moml)er of tho choir to be responsible for the musi'j for one Sunday.  The Alpha Guild Stewardship Reading contest totals for the week ending Feliniary 7, were: (¡race Uimb's side, 270.') points, and Jennie I.aniti's side, no.'i points.  February 22 is China Sunday. Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Smith, of Ningpo, China, will be with us all day. The Presbyterian churches of Dana, Paton, Grand Junction and Churdan. and tho other churches of .lolTorson are invited to the vesjier service at live o'clock on that day.  The Friendly will meet at tho church oil Thursday, Fob. 12. .Mrs. Cora Putfor will lie assistiW by .Mrs. Alice Peck, Miss Anna ll(\th, Mrs. W. D. Gilchrist. Mrs. K. C. .Smith, Mrs. Roiior DuiMop and Mrs. M. T. Peterson. The nomillatin^c committee will be appointed at this mooting.  Mrs. P. M. Gore will entertain tho regular nioetiiig of tho I.itrht Bearers on Saturday afternoon, Feliruary 14.  .Sunday school at 10. Morning worship at 11. Vesper worsliip at r>. Prayer meeting Thursday evening at 7:;iO.  Bring your gift and build the wall.  Greenbrier News  A group of 14 friends and neighbors ofMr. and Mrs. Doyle Shank gathered at their home Monday evening, . , , , ,, „,.„ Fob. 1), and enjoved a picnic dinner in j b«* assisted by Mrs. Will Stevens honor of their lOth wedding anniver- | Miss Gertrude Dagget sary, which was that day. The guests I The Perry Baptist Young Peopl remained to spend the evening around , the First Baptist church will c card tables. Among those present tain the Jefferson Baptist young wore: Mr. and Mrs. Craig Peacock, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Calvert and (laughtiT, U'ora, Mr. and Mrs. .Sain llotrman and two daughters, Golda and Madie. Goo. Schouerman, of Hagley, and Henry Ilo.-^s. of Cooper. Also Mr. and Mrs. F. Peacock and resent.  the largest number of "reg boarders" in n considerable peria time. Still, says Foss, ther room for one more. If the tion continues to grow at t the plan is to install "double de beds and take care of the errant i until they stick out of the roof.  Public Sale Dates Sam Roberts & Sons, bred sale, Feb. 11. Mrs. Will Horan, Thursday, Feti R. E. Drake, Thursday, Feb. Vere Fisher, Friday, Feb. 18. A. W. Morse Livestock: Sale,; pey, Monday, Feb. 16. M. C. Youngblood, hr/sd sow j  February 17. ........: ' ■ •  Corwin 'rhoniBSj^Tuesday, Thos.  ' Chas. Carver, We Roy V. CApp, Wednesday^ Orson Beebe, Thursday, Peh. Hoyle-Guess, Friday, Feb. 20.  Cedar Township Meeting Chester Pulley and daughter efl tained the CedaV township FarmJ reau on Friday, February 6. crowd was present. The prog committee had prepared an excel program and it consisted of thef lowing numbers: Piano duet by Beecher and Irene Nesbit; "Sli Ride;" a reading by Arlene Love| a guitar solo by Doris and Gli Hardaway, a reading by Lois less, Leota Winkleman, a piano by Gene Beecher and Irene Nesbij reading by L.iVerne Ccchran, "To^ Must Be Tied Tonight." A claj solo by Gladys Hardaway and a by Arlene and Lois loveless, "Sp Time in the Rockies. Lunch served and the mooting brought close.—LaVerne Cochran, Socy.  Baptist Church  Come unto me all yo that labor] aro heavy laden; take my yoke you anil loarn of me, for 1 am and  lowly of heart, and ye shall rest unto your soul.  ■Ml regular services at this chul Siindav school at 10. Classesl all ages.  Public worship at 11. "Secrets of Life." 1!. Y. I*. U. at 6:;i0. Evening' service at 7:30. Near to God."  The Friendly Indians friends will hold their annual crack in the basement of the Bajj church Thursday afternoon Charley will welcome the help of! man who desires to do something! the boys of the community, know any one who criticises, bu takes a real man to bear it and keep doing the best he can, regardlj  Tho Kensington will meet day at the home of .Mrs. T. E. Thoig She will be assisted by Mrs.  and  on weri  NOTICE TO ItlDDEUS  Sealed proposals will lie received the otrice of the County .Auditor, (irooue county, Iowa, until 10;1IU o'clock a. m. on Feliruary 1(1, l!'".!. for a janitor of the (iroone ('<iiinty Court ilouso. The duties will be as pri'si'iibed by tho rules and regulations as adopted by the ciistoilian of the Court House and the Croi'ne County Hoard of Supervisors. C.ipy of said roles and rep;ulatloiis may lie aeon and may bo secured at tho above office.  Tho county reserves tho right to waive all tochnicalitios and to reject any or all bids.  E. B. McGlothlen, 61c County Auditor.  pie at a Valentine party Friday ing. They are expecting a full gation of our people present.  School Officers Notice  ; School election packages may!  secured at our otfice now. Calif I these when you are in town the I time. R. A. Morris, Co. Supt.  dro:  -Rummage prici .ses Í18c at Down  ,)M ladies Ä .Mayer's, issard K'arter ¡n'lts and gird ■ÍI^.^ÍO. The Ilariling Sho  —Now is the time /or hooked rugs. New patterns at The Harding Shop.  COMBINATION  SPECIALS Feb. 11-Feb. 21  Hot Oil Sliampoo—Marcel i  75c  Hot Oil Sliampoo, FingerWav  75c  BELL'S BEAUTY SHOl   

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