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Iowa City Daily Citizen Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1893 - Page 1

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Publication: Iowa City Daily Citizen

Location: Iowa City, Iowa

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   Daily Citizen, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1893, Iowa City, Iowa                               t JINGLE COPY, THREE CENTS. TELEPHONE NUMBER 87 I VOLUME I. IOWA CITY, MONDAY EVENING, APEIL 3, 1893. NUMBER 299 We Have the Finest Line CONFIRMATION SUITS In the City. Dur Hat Department s Complete With all the latest Novelties in Soft Hats aud Derbies. GOflST he American Clothiers. TACTS BRIEFLY STATED. fcalph Shotwell, a boy. was burned 'ta in his father'shomeat Wilkes- re, Pa. Talton, who was to have been at Talequah, I. T., Friday, was ited a thirty days' respite by Chief cls. Secretary Carlisle wishes to have the announced that no one wno has discharged from the treasury de- icnt will be restored. jThomas M, Newson, of St. Paul, United States consul at Malaga, in, died at Malaga of smallpox, 62 years. Jmiral Gherardi, with the Phila- phia, Baltimore. Yorktown, Vesu- and Cushing, arrived at Fortress aroe, eorge Washington Lusk, a preach- nd one of the best-known colored in Kentucky, died in Lexington age of 98 years. he original drafts of the declara- of independence and the constitu- of the United States will not be _jt to the world's fair, Secretary lifesham having decided that the risk s too great. The American Stave Cooperage ompany was incorporated with a eap- tal stock of at Trenton, N. The company proposes to control tie manufacture of whisky and drug Asks and barrels. new Columbus stamped en- lopes have been placed on sale. The lamped impression is of the same color I the Columbian adhesive stamp, but e design represents an eagle with fttstretched wings and open mouth. ULURES FOR THREE MONTHS. Total la Smaller Than for Eleven with Outs Exception. :NBW YORK, April Business fail- S throughout the United States dur- the last thi ee months number smaller total with one exception ian has been similarly reported for leven years. Last year there were ;207 failures during January, Febru- y and March. The total liabilities individuals, firms and corporations the last quarter aggregate as compared with increase of about 9 per font, while the falling off in num- ber of failures thus far this year us compared with last year is a trifle over 4 per cent. Total assets of failing traders for three months this year amount to an increase of about 11 per cent, showing relatively a larger increase in available assets indebtedness, and pointing failures having been pre- through embarrassment of While there were nearly ixty failures in the United States urfag the last three months having labilities each of or more, and pbout the same number during a like icriod in 1893, the more serious char icter of some of those taking place his year will be observed when it is mown the aggregate liabilities for 893 is in excess of as cora iared with less than in the irst Quarter of 1801. ONE KILLED, TWO CAPTURED. than in o some ipitated thers. Robbers Undertake to Hold Cp Palmer Storekeeper. TACOJTA, Wash., April a-Wtiile John Peterson, proprietor of a large general store at Palmer Station, 44 miles from this city, was pre- paring to close the store Thursday night three masked men entered and with drawn revolvers demanded the contents of the safe. Peterson re- garded the affair as a joke and refused to comply. The robbeis pounced on him and clubbed him into insensibility. By this time Samuel Eitchie. pro- prietor of the hotel, rushed to Peter- son's assistance. The robbers then fled toward river. A posse was organized, and after a hard chase captured two of the robbers. The third member of the gang refused to surrender and continued _, his flight. Being unable to overtake him, and as he had refused to obey several commands to surrender one of the posse shot him dead. The men are supposed to be members of anogan- ized gang which robbed the Boslyn baflk last fall and later held up a Northern Pacific passenger train near Hot Springs. MURDERED WHILE ASLEEP. FOOD FOR FLAMES. A Hotel at Bradford, De- stroyed by Fire, The Brutally Dliflgured Body of. a Wo man Found in Chicago CHICAGO, April German -woman who was known only as and who has been stopping with Mrs. Stair at 844 State street, was found mur- dered in her bed at noon. The mur- dered woman went to the room Friday night -with a man who bore the appearance of being a German. Nothing' more was seen of them until noon. Then the chambermaid found the door locked and secured a step-lad- der and looked over the transom. On tHe ted she saw the body of the woman, the head being covered with a man's coat The door was forced and the woman found to be dead, her brains battered out with a beer bottle, which, covered with blood, lay by her side. Suit Agalmt Hill. LnrcoLS, Neb., April 1 o'clock H'rlday morning Judge Wakely, on he- half of the state of Nebraska, filed suit in the office of the Douglass county dis- trict court against John E. Hill, ex- treasurer of Nebraska, and his bonds- men. This action is brought to recoTer deposited by Hill in the Cap- ital national bank of Lincoln and lost by the failure of institution, Church Killed Him. NEW YOBK, April F. Mor- sen, an invalid priest at the St, Denis hotel, celebrated his 67th birthday by committing suicide. In a note he said he was driven to commit the deed by the incessant ringing of the chimes of St Grace church._________ Will Open the Fair. WASBBTSTOS, April a ClevelandVill open the world's fair on the 1st day of May. He has definitely decided to do this and will send his ac- ceptance to the Chicago committee in a day or two. Five Persons Known to Have Per- ished More Than a Score of Others Injured. BURNED TO DEATH. Pa., Apri] at a. m destroyed the Higg-ms hotel, the Buffalo, Rochester Pittsburgh the Higffins cigar factory and the gro- cery store and building of J. Leroy. At least six persons were burned to death and the list of the injured num- bers between twenty and thirty. The bodies of five persons have already been taken from the ruins and are burned beyond recognition, Friday night 135 persons went to sleep in the building, and while it is known that many had jumped from the second and third story windows it was feared that many others had perished in the The deaoValready taken from the ruins are: v The Dead. George Parks, machinist. Buffalo, Rochester Pittsburgh shops; F. Havelin, engineer, Pennsylvania Eastern railroad; Miss G. Bond, Bradford; Tom painter; a child ofMrs E Tucker; E. Tucker. The Injured. Hal Rhodes, ankle sprained; James Bryser, face, hands und feet badly cut; W. D. Drys- flale, of Johnsonbwg, injured internally; J, D. Cady, Jamestown, hurt about the head; H. J. Campbell, of Bellwood, arm broken and tup dislocated; Harry Jones, cats about the head, face .and hands; James Brisson, carpenter, head out, W. J. HoUlday, Olifcg salesman, ankle broken; Mrs Weaver, burned about the head and arms, her baby is missing, Juby Haanon, glass blower, cut about hands and head and In- jured internally; J. Cody, clerk, badly burned and injured from jumping W. J, Osborne, Buffalo, injured, it is feared that hie back is broken, considered fatal; Mrs hurt internally and badly burned: J W Weivmeyer, leg broken. Mrs. E. Tucker and baby, of Elnura, both badly burned about hands and bodies; W. B injured internally: Kienard HiRgins, hand broken and burned: Ted Burns, fireman, Biidly hurt by failing wall; J Pickard, night clerk, leg broken, hurt internally: Cook Mc- Na.be, head and face cut; Mike Collins, hand and shoulder injured; W. J, Hasted, injured m- ternallj. Finding the It was after B o'clock before the first body was found. It was an unrecog- nizable, charred mass of flesh. The second was found soon after in a simi- lar condition. The search continues as this dispatch is being written, and itis impossible to state at present how many lives have been lost. It is feared that some of those who jumped from the hotel into the creek were drowned, Awakened by Alarm of Fire. The inmates of the Biggins building were awakened from their sleep by a man who rushed through the hallways, kicking at the doors and calling fire. The men and women rushed from their rooms into the halls, which were al- ready filled with smoke and flame, and the general cry was: "Jump from the windows and save Many did so, but the jump was a bad one to risk. From the upper story it was 30 feet on the west side, with a plank roadway on which to land. On the east side was the creek, which made the jump 40 feet Several persons made the leap for life into the stream and were res- cued. Mr. and Mrs. Higgins escaped from the burning building after they were nearly suffocated by the smoke. Mrs. Higgins was badly injured and was carried to the Riddell house. Scenes. The Riddell house has been trans- formed into a temporary hospital. In one room is Prof. Neumeyer, of the Jamison orchestra. His left foot was crushed and he is seriously hnrt internally. In another room J. W. Osborn lies, both legs broken and his back injured. In another apartment are two men hurt in- ternally and badly bruised about their heads. Two women are in another, burned about their faces and hands. One of the women has lost her baby and her agony is pitiful. John Johnson, a boy, was found wan- dering through the streets with a 3- year-old baby in his arms', its face, arms and hands burned and blistered. The cause of the fire is unknown, hut it Is supposed to have caught from a gas stove. The Joss will reach 000. _______________ Hanged. MACON, Ga., April Lewis, a negro, was hanged in the Bibb county jail at noon Friday for the murder o: his wife. The crime was committed in September, 1890. Lewis had three trials. The execution, which was pri vate, passed off without a hitch. The man's neck was broken. He died pro testing his innocence and claimed tha the shot which killed his wife was ac cidental. ______________ A null la As HOMER, 111., April The Home flouring mill was discovered to be on fire about 3 o'clock Friday morning and in two hours was burned to ashes The grain office owned by the Home Elevator company was also burned Loss, about insurance, Afbuey for a. Hlnniwottt College. HAVERHILL, Mass., April ton college, at Northfleld, Minn., has been left by the will of James H Garleton, of this city. Carleton left an estate of and left fo charitable and benevolent purposes. THEY FOUND1 THE SPARK. Two Workmen Killed Trying to Light a BlMt. PITTSBURGH, April S. Through lawlessness and ignorance while dis- charging a blast in the stonequarry at Edna, Pa., Friday House- man was instantly killed and Matthew Ijan fatally injured. The men had placed a charge in the rock and ighted the fuse, but as no ex- plosion followed they returned to the cause. Houseman got down on his knees and began blow- ng to find the spark, and Eyan ook off his hat, which he used as a fan to aid his brother workman in the search. While the workmen were in this position, one with his head over ;he blast and the other standing by his tide, the explosion occurred. Only Souseman's body was found, his head having been blown oft. HORROR IN A MINE. GALVESTOS, Tex., April Oyster- mea from the natural reefs in West bay, 10 miles irom this city, report the oysters dying by the thousands. The cause assigned is the creosoted piling used in constructing the approaches to the county wagon bridge across the bay, which it is claimed poisons the water and kills the oysters. It is feared that unless a remedy is discovered all the oyster beds in West bay will be wiped out of existence. Injured In a Wreck. LEADVILLE, Col., April -The Denver Rio Grande express going west was wrecked Friday night 1 mile from the depot, and of the 200 passen- gers about a score were injured, in- cluding Mrs. G. Wilson and E. R. whole family, of Chicago, all of whom, however, were only slightly injured. _ New Jecsry Forests Ablaze, MAT'S LANDING, N. J., April A large forest fire has been raging- be- tween Millville and this place. Friday night the Jewish settlement of Carinel narrowly escaped destruction. It is feared much valuable timber will be destroyed. The burning of brush by woodsmen is the supposed origin. FOOT Beported Killed. WINNIPEG, Man., April Word has been received here of a serious acci- dent to the Atlantic express at Agassiz Point in British Columbia. Stephen Whyte, brother-in-law of Judee KUlam. of Winnipeg, is killed; also the fire- man. Two others also reported killed. Heir to a Large Estate. WOSCESTEB, Mass., April James H. Ferguson, of Millbury, received word Friday that an uncle had died in Edinburgh, Scotland leaving a fortune estimated at and that he as a direct heir would receive a propor- tionate share. The uncle was John Ferguson, hut owing to an entrange- ment between him and Mr. Fergu son's father the nephew knows but lit- tle of the uncle's history. THB MAKKETS. Grain, Etc. CHICAGO, April l. Quiet and steady. Spring wheat patents, Straights, ter wheat patents, Straights, 340. Weak at No. 3, No 2 Yellow and No. 2 White, 10c; No S 38c; No. 3 Yellow, 38tf c; May, July, 4 Ixmer. No. S cash, 29c: May, July, Samples lower. No. 3 No. 3 White. No.n3, No. a Wblte, M149MXC. Weaker. No. 2 cash. and May, IB OSOc, Samples of No. 2. outside fine NO. 3, Qniet and low grades dulL Qood to choice barley steady. Low grades quotable at medium salable at and good to choice fair sale at and fancy 
                            

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