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Iowa City Daily Citizen: Friday, February 17, 1893 - Page 1

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   Daily Citizen, The (Newspaper) - February 17, 1893, Iowa City, Iowa                               vv'--'V IFEOCFXiErS SINGLE COPY, THREE GENTS. TELEPHONE NUMBER flf VOLUME L IOWA CITY, FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 1893. NUMBER 261 WE ARE GIVING 25 Per ON ALL Winter PREPARATORY TO INVOICING, THE AMERICAN IOWA ClfY, IbWA DANCE OF DEATH. Terrible Disaster at a Ball in Hungary. An Explosion of Oil Sets Firs to the Deaths Reported in a Panic. THEY BETBEAT. HlttMd. A police officer who was on tbe car said the motorman was not to blame; that the brakes would not hold the car. INSOLVENT FOR TEN YEARS. TO-WOK. BUDA PESTH, Feb. dance was given Monday evening in Deutsehe-'Poreg. AAtll- o'clock, when about 100 parsons were dancing lit the hall on the first a child playing in the v. cellar a through thev.bnnghole of a cafik full ot petroleum. The cask explodedtkilled the child, -tore _-np._ the dance floor and scattered the burning petroleum 'among the dancers, 'A dozen persons1 in flame ran for the win- dows and doors, spreading-fire and panic among the rest of the com- pany. Half- the people in the hall were at -the -end.from which there was no exit, and as the floor on jjp-tbealde near the -windows had been. they were obliged to run. the whole length, of the biasing room' to escape. Ten persons fell-through'to the cellar and were burned to i death. ,'Sev.en more whose clothes had caught fire, died shortly after reaching the open air. Three were trampled into oiMonscionsness in '.the -panic and were burned as. they lay. on r the, floor..' Five men and seven women, whose clothes were half burned 'from theiri backs, are in condition. Many othersJiave slight fractures or burns. But thirty or forty persons escaped without injuries. ______ ELECTRIC-CAR RUNS AWAY. Killed -and-Many Injured, in an Accident at Portland, Ore. PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. fright- ful accident occurred on Suburban Electric railway Wednesday i afternoon in which' three persons were instantly killed and a dozen severely injured. A car was going down hill, when 'Its motorman lost control of'it and it -plunged down two blocks .at terrific speed. When the car reached a curve at the bottom of the hill it left the track and was over- turned. The momentum was BO great that the ear, leaving the dashed to pieces, There were forty- fivepassengers them 1 being twenty young people, who con- stituted the graduating _class of Wil- liams 'avenue grammar school The dead J1. Q. Dennis, aged 70 years; Bertram Dennis, his son, aged 8 years, anil-'T.. T. Johnson. James fee- was probably fatally Injured, 'early every one on1 the car was cut bruised. The motorman and oon< factor .were arrested, bat subsequently Latest Hens from Topeka Indi- cates a Republican Victory. Deserted by the Officers of the Stale Militia. Gov. Levelling Withdraws His from the Field. THE SISez BA18EH. TOFBKA. Feb. popu- lists have practically abandoned the field. The crisis raised by Sheriff Wilkeraon's ont a posse ot men to defend tbe republican posi- tion is so critical a one and one so filled with embarrassing difficulties that they decided not to meet it At noon the governor held a conference with the. populist house members and .various leaders of the party. Tbe, governor said" that the militia.conld not be depended upon to carry ont his orders; that the resist- ance of 126 men composing the force Of deputy sergeants and 100 provision- al troops (all that could he-depended. upon stand'. Joyal) would useless before the sheriffs posse' of men. It was decided to hire a hall down town for the populist house, and there meetings of the populist house will be held until the difficulties .are looked upon1 by some as a hut Itjs regarded as the logical outcome ijf the sheriffs action in sum- moning his posse to support the repab- in the Broken Reekafvllow Bank CenU on the Dollar. WJLKSBBAEBK, Pa., Feb. The as- signee of El V. Bockafellow ft' Co. '8 broken bank has made a preliminary report. Be finds things in very bod shape. The' bank- has been insolvent for ten years. Eockafellow, he says, never made a report of the bank's condition in. 4wenty -.years. Bockafellow was short' in! his accounts five years ago. He at once began a race with the insolvent -bank, He in- sured his life heavily. Had death overtaken ,him ;to. -1890 the hank would have won in the race -and -the -depositors ;would have been safe. In tbe meantime the bank's surplus was growing less and the insurance pre- miums were harder to pay. As a -re- sult-, the hanker, was compelled to drop several policies. At one -time he -was insured for According to the 'figures furnished by the: assignee it is 'doubtful if _the bank will pay its depositors 30 cents .on the dollar. _ More PANS, Feb. M, Lequay, ad- judged guilty of complicity, in the Pan- ama-canal frauds, was on- Wednesday sentenced to five, years' imprisonment Prevost, on the  lands under existing- ttwauntjl anch tune as eon- greu'ean provide a perininent form of government Islands. J3us, legis- lation should be, and I do not doubt wiQ iqit only Just to the natives 'and all other acteftieoV bjr for the rights ot all iae-people, and of all for- eigners domiciled, there, r, Terms of The terms of the treaty are briefly written on four sheets 'of .manuscript. A synopsis follows: It provldeslor the annexation gf the Islands by-.the trotted States, and tie present pro- visional government Is-authorized 1o con- tinue its iuncdoiia until further-, legislation by 'congress be'had' on. the" subject' Ample 'provision" is made 'for the deponed queen, who is to receive for thtt royal1 family.' Ail -the" property rights on the Islands are preserved, and, in tbe meantime 3he laws of tbe United States such as are enforced hi Alaska will be observed. All the'lnhabitants of the Islands "who Are restricted from 'citizen- ehip under the existing- laws are as sojournera. Tbis applies to tbe Chlnese'who ate The Chinese restriction act Is 'to be observed "there just aa it is 1n country.-'- .TheJETnlied States are to assume alt-the of Hawaii and receive-all tbe revenues -which are derived therefrom. It is understood -that tbe debts of Hawaii .are 000, while the :receipts from all' sources average about annually. The present republican fprm of gov- ernment IB to be maintained until congress has an opportunity to devise a more convenient system, Tbe present form of government of -Alaska is suggested as desirable, while a mission such as governs the District of Colum- bia is also proposed. The details, are to be de- termined later. Upon the exchange of ratifications of the treaty the provisional goverhment is turn over- to the designated-authorities of the United States wbat-mlght-be called tHe assets of tbe kingdom of Hawaii, and the government estab- lished by congress will take its place. Under the provisions of the treaty the sugar producers of Hawaii will not participate in the bounty provided by the HcKlnley law unless congress should extend It to the islands. Secretary Foster's Letter. In his letter to the president, Secre- tary Foster recapitulates the history of the revolution, relates .the facts oi the establishment of the provision- al government, the appearance oi tbe commissioners at Washington and the negotiations for the treaty. In re- gard .to. protectorate, Secretary Foster says: "An Instruction has been sent to the minister commending bis action In sorfar as it lay with' in the purview of standing instructions to the legation and to tbe naval commanders'of tbe United States in Hawaiian tended to cooperate with the administration of affairs by tbe provisional government, but disavowing any steps In excess of such instructions where- by the authority and power of the United States might appear to have been asserted to the impairment of the independent sover eignty of tbe Hawaiian government by the assumption of a formal protectorate." In conclusion the secretary says thai pending the negotiation he received as- surances from representatives of the leading powers of the world in this city and from our own ministers abroad convincing him that the incor- poration of the Hawaiian islands into the union will be regarded by these powers with satisfaction or ready ac- quiescence. .Opposition to ftstlfleatloMi A decided opposition to 'the tion of the Hawaiian treaty .ifas sprung up in the senate and it is of such pro- portions as to warrant attenator in dictingtbat it would not-4w ratified this session, Senators Vest, Urioe, Pettigrew, White, Gray, Black- burn, Daniel and Wolcott are- known .to oppose it, and though a canvass of the senate has-discovered two-thirds in favor ot ratification it IB fewed by' its advocates that tbe wttt filibuster against it Of the tneatyV- ultimate ratification, Aowever, then seems to be but little doubt v Some fanlt la fownd ;he apparent baste., of President Harrison in Bending the treaty to the senate before the sives of the queen had an opportunity to present their side of tbe caae. there is fault found because annexa- tion would work to the financial- benefit of some sngart men. But these objec- tions will not avail with sucV as Sherman and Morgan, who- look upon tbe question from a ilane. They believe that the ire indispensable to this country for mrposes of defense, and as it is prettf understood that unless tbe United States annexes islands Great Brit- ain will try to do so. The belief isttaiir the treaty will be ratified before. Harem- 4. _ _: TO SUCCEED SCHOLFIELO. Prominent Candidates for on the Illinois anpreme Beach. IU.t tictanKat the. capital are successor to Judge Schplneid on the bench of the supreme court "A special election will be nec- essary to fill tbe vacancy ernor'will :for in Hay. ..the1 ife whelmingly democratic; ind octat ..will _certainly, be chosen his successor- B. Bnr- rooghs, of Edwardsville; Phillips, of Hillsboro. and George W. ,Herdman, of 'Jereeyville. are mentioned for the place, lowjng counties the..distrtetr Madison, Bond, Marion, Jersey, Calhonn. Clay, Bichland, Iiawrenaev Jasperr ette, EfBoghatn, Montgomery, eonpin, Shelby and Christian. -CATASTROPHE fW 'lOvVA. Man Killoo and Ten, Injured .by m- Explewjon In a Mine-New Feb. ah ex- plosion of dust ignited by ,a> shot in thrf Cedar Amines, rS miles from WeinesdaTr one. man, ,Jowph1 gher, was -killed .ten otnen seriousiyC burned in their rlaeea and hands, "and 'afe ,niany attife WH ceived lesser Wounds.' -About one hmn- dred'men were inthetninesitthWtune, would: have, been the shot, Joaeph was by the explosion; and ihe Ahot for, 1W feet that to the' 'floor, 'some uneonsciona. HOOP8K1RTS FINp -NO to 'PnnMb HABBISBCKS, able amusement was created in isenate Wednesday, morning by the reading of a petition offered 'by Mr. Hackenberg asking factare and sale 'Of hoops and crino- lines be made a misdemeanor. -PreaJ-- dent Pro Tern. Gobin, referred it to the committee on retrenchment and ifortn. 1 SAOKAMKSTO, Cal, Teb. bitt introdncAd in the house Wednes- day prohibiting the wearing of skirts and providing a penalty for viohv 'tion of the law. ILLINOIS. Uov, Altgeld Improved to. of; the III. Feb. 17. Alt- geld returned home late Wednesday night and was in his office during the morning. He Is much improved in. and he will devote the next few days to business whicb has accum- ulated during his For present be will see BO officeseekers. The governor had nothing to say re- garding" the -of Gillia against ex-officials, In the house Speaker Crafts refused to recognize Representative McMillan, Morgan, when he wanted to explain his vote on a resolution compellinif members to vote when in their seats. -The resolution is intended'to prevent breaking a quorum; antU Mr. McMillan wanted to speak. .When by the speaker, he grew purple -with rage'and started to leave the house, de- claring he would resign'. He was ly induced by friends to return. Mr.' Carmody presented a bill from the labor bill making rail- roads responsible for injuries and death, of employes caused by the negligence- of .other company employes. It was ruled out of order on the ground that the bill was on a subject whicb had never been referred to the commit- tee. The bill defining the liability of employers to employes in cases, being practically a bill applied to all corporations of the state, was ordered to a first reading A favorable report was made on the- bill Increasing the liability of railway companies for deaths caused by rail- ways from to A resolu- tion was adopted requesting Illinois' congressmen to vote for the bill In- creasing and equalizing salaries letter carriers. In the senate the hill to amend Australian ballot law by providing that coupons be affixed "to tbe -ballots to be torn off by of' election before a voter the booth and compared to .'prevent fraudulent sab- stitution of unofficial special orderfor WedMadar nmk w> -tfln -5 3l 1 L   

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