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Iowa City Daily Citizen Newspaper Archive: October 11, 1892 - Page 1

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Publication: Iowa City Daily Citizen

Location: Iowa City, Iowa

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   Daily Citizen, The (Newspaper) - October 11, 1892, Iowa City, Iowa                               HN3H- COPT, 2 CENTS, THE VOLUME I. IOWA CITY, -TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11. 1892. TELEPHONE NO. 87 NUMBER 151. FORTY FEET SOLID PLflTE GLflSS FRONT! SQUARE FEET On FJrst in bauk and two sky-lights in ceatcr. This is why every- one says that lave tho lightest and handsomest store in the city. Our stock is almost entirely new, consisting of the latest as well as a full line of staple goods, selected from the New York and other eastern markets. We buy Trunks and Valises by the car load and it will pay you o get our prices before purchasing. -sCOAST eASLGY> T1E AMERICAN CLOTHIERS. LOST AT SEA. Awful Disaster on the Pacific, Off Port Townaend, -Wash, Steamships Collide During a Dense Fog One la Lives Persons Hurt. BENT TO THE BOTTOM. SEATTLE, Wash., Oct Cana- dian Pacific Navigation Company's steataer Premier was struck by the steam collier Willamette in a dense fog off IVhidby island, about 10 miles south of Port Townsend, at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Four men were killed, one drowned and seventeen badly injured. The steam tuff Goliath has arrived here with three of the dead, all ot the wounded and the other passengers. The dead are: The Killed. Johannas Hoe, ot Tacoma, aged 40. motorman on the electric line. Prank C. Wyacoup, 13 years old. son or D. J. Wyncoop, Tacomn; John Ranfcm, waiter, Seattle, aged un- known passenger, KRC about 40, still In wreck, uslinown passenger, jumped overboard oca drowned. The Disaster. The Premier left Port Townsend about fof Seattle, in a heavy fog. She was blowing her whistle continu- ously. When off Point No-Point an- othervessel sounded close "by, and al- most immediately afterwards a terrific crash was heard. The fore cabin of the Premier was smashed to splinters and the prow of the Willamette was found jammed right into the bow of the Ptemler. The Willamette was laden with coal and was on her way from Seattle to Han Francisco. Thejfe were several the Premier's cabin, one of was killed, together wjth a boy. A who was in the sa3oon eat- ing his dinner was instantly killed. Several other passengers were jammed in the debris. Some of them srriously wounded and all more less bruised. The stem of the Wil- was so deeply imbedded in the Premier that the passengers scrambled over tlie broken woodwork and 'on the collier. The women were handed up first, followed by the wounded as fast as they could'be moved. Men with oroken limbs, and both men and women with bleeding faces and bodies were helped up. It was soon seen to be impossible to draw of the Willamette without sinking the Premier, so Capt. Anderson determined to forge ahead, driving before him the steamer Spiked on Ins bow. He forced her back on the beach and was so tightly wedged that J'e could not back off without dragging the Premier with him. The Itah, towing out a, achooDer, was hailed and she took off the passengers, bear- ing them to Seattle. The receding tide left both vessels stranded and still in- terlocked. Kalemed from JalL LOITDOIT, Oct. Moore, of Burgess, Moore's partner, went to Bow street police court and offered to become sureties for tbe convicted prize fighter in the sum of The magis- trate accepted them as bondsmen, and the necessary papers were signed he iasured an order to the war- den of Hollo way jail to, immediately release the prisoner. A Big Vear'i Work, WASHINGTON, Oct. annual report   of tlie parochial Sfhools, Hud on n neighboring stand 900 tiny waifs belonging to the Children's aw 'ciety waved their miniature American fiags as the profession passed by. Carlfele Indian Uoys. Biit the feature of the parndo which peril apis attracted more utteutiou than any other along the Jiut- wits thi1 uiuirh of. not "six litth' luaum boys." but SOU of them iruiu Carlisle (1'a.) ii.- dian iudtisti'iul M'hmnt tfroinn mit'ii in tliuir owu biitul uf musk1 ,un! ;iui li dressed in Imli.iii n-tui" u.i. .'.v uniform of their school. Three stuvdy- Efoinjf warriors, admirably illustrated the fact that education and mil dor uud more humauizing methods tliun originally pursued are surely aud uven rapidly elevating in the of eiiilistu- tion the race whom Co-lumbtis found iu sole pOfasesiiion of the country he claimed by right of ChrUtiim discovery. Aoxito of tlifl The route of the was from the neighborhood of Fifth avenue and Vifty-seveuth Sstretit, neur the lower entrance to Centml park, down Fifth avenue to Seven- teenth street and Union sqimre, thence around theMJuare toFourternlhstreet, to Fifth aviiiiuu aguin, uud dowu Ihsit thoroughfare to Washington square. West Fourth street aud Broadway, at which points the signal to disband wus given. Reviewed the Parade. The presidential reviewing stand in Madlsoa square opposite the Worth statue was pleasantly shaded by pink striped awnings supplementing the fall foliage of tbe trees lu the square, The stands stretching to right and left of the presidential dais uud on the op- posite side of the avenue the entire length of the squure were thronged with spectators who were admitted by ticket only. At the first division, came to the waiting crowd. The carriage of GOT. Boswell P. Flower, New York's chief executive, drawn by a pair of spanking bays, drove up rapidly to the review- ing stand and the governor alight- ed, accompanied by Adjt, Hen. Porter In full dress uniform and followed by Gens. Earle, Barnum, Jenka, Ualsej and Other members of the governor's staff. The spectators cheered the governor and renewed the cheer ing when, immediately afterward, the guest of the Vice President Mor- ton, representing President Harrison, drove up in an open barouche and was received at the entrance- to the stand by Gov. Flower, who conducted him to the seat set apart for the absent presi- dent It was o'clock before the first distant strains of the numerous bands fell upon the ear and at the ad- vance squad of splendidly mounted po- lice and the marshals and his aids, wearing gorgeous sashes of the na- tional colors, rode past The vice presi- dent and governor rose to receive them aud bowed as each of the well-mounted aids raised his hat Next came Mayor Grant and Commissioner Gug- gonheimer, sturdily inarching on foot at the head of the first di- vision and lustily cheered aa they came along. Then came the boys, with their own bands in uniform, marching twenty abreast with a mic swing and a military bearing which carried all before it, and com- pany after company was greeted with shouts of applause as each seemed to march even better than the company preceding. MANY FISHERMEN LOST. Newfoundland Veaieli tso Down During: the tinla at Labrador. HALIFAX. N. S., Oct. tbe six fishermen reported missing1 from the Gloucester schooner Henrietta three were landed at Bay of Bulls, N. F., by the schooner Knight Templar, and tho other three are reported to have been picked up by a Newfoundland schooner. The Newfoundland schooner Reason has been missing since August 15, and is given up for with of ten men. The schooner E. B. Phil- lips has collided with an unknown ves- Ssd. Her crew (4 nine men were lost, Heven Newfoundland vessels were lost during a recent gale at Labrador. CRE8PO REIGNS. The Victorious Revolutionist Lead- er Honored in Venezuela. Triumphal Entry to Fol- lowed by Selection as Provisional Premier. A NEW Bl'LKR. CAHACAS. Oct., 11. llco Crespo was aoconlett nn en thus! instil- reception upon his triumphal pniry iuto Curactis Sunday. He iimrcliwl Into the capital at the head of the reniuintli'r of his urmy, mt-n having tultt'n possession of thu eity SnUiriliiy. Mtulv I' real ilc lit. A comu'il of Ins officers uud advtuurs was held and the rusult was the procla- mation of Crespo as pro vision til president of tht> republic. He is to hold oiUce only until Mva regularly uungressiuun have hml time to muet ami proceed to the electinn of ii constitu- tional Huucessor to ex- President liiii- muudo I Crespo then issued a proclamation naming the following1 Cabinet: Minister nr foreign Kzequlol Rojiia. uiinlstt-r of the Ulterior, Leon Collimr minister of ItnauL'M, Senor Plctrti, miulHlor ur wfti1, Alvart'r; cliic'f D( iifilk'tt, Ooti. Viutvr RodrUilloz. o! poldo BaptlNtii; mlnlsiUir or public worltu, MH- no'i Tubur: minister ol Instructions, Sllvn Oaudoipby; gen oral In cfalrt, Ktimon Rovernot of Cur nous So not Atidcude. Kami Tbeae are all well-known Venezue- lans who have aided tbe cause of the legalists by active service in the field or by financial contributions. The pro- visional cabinet general satisfac- tion. It will restore order throughout the diitr acted republic. The rumors con- cern in ff the of the de facto presi- dent, Vlllegas-Pulidg, and his minis- term we confirmed. They managed to get a vessel bound for Martinique. It la said to be their intention to proceed to France. ACCUSED OF TREASON. lit Conference. SALT LAKE, Utah, Oct. The si seeond conference of the Mormon church closed Saturday, with in attendance at the closing1 fcion. The president failed to come for- ward with the customary new revela- tion. The of tbe various stakes in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona and Mexico showed a total membership of over It was decided to dedicate the nfw temple on April 6, 1S03, This building was com- menced forty years ago, and has cost Chlel J ui Pax tou't Charge to Orniid Jurf at PIltilWKh No tar Violence at H out w tend Corpora- Have the Rlirbt tu Import Armed PiTTSBunau, Pa., Oeti 11. Chlt-f Jus- tice Paxtou, of the state supreme court, at 10 a, m. charged the grand Jury In the. treason cases against the Home- stead strikers. The churgu contained over words and embraced n graph- ic resume of the circumstances leading up to the riot at the Carnegie Home- stead mill and the subsequent charges of treason lodged against thirty-three uo-ion men. Justice Paxton said: "We tun liiive wrac sympathy With u mob driven to desperation by hunger, UK In duys of the French revolution, but wo can Hud none tor men recelrilig exceptionally high wagus In resisting tho tttw and roMortlnK to vlolencu and bloodihcd (n the nsaorlton o( rl and entailing flueti a uxponie 6poa itie payorH of tho uommonwoiiltli. It not a ury for bread to feed thotr furnishing lips, result I nf In a ludden outmge, with ijaod pro went Ion; It wan deliberate lit tempt by men without authority to control In tho finjoymcut of their righto ID defining tbe law, Justice Pax ton said: "When tho compacy shutdown Its works and dlfldinrgcd Its men it wus uullng utrluLly In tho lines of (no law; ft could not torn pel thfl tnun to work nor could tho men compel thu Lo employ tharni no could he nude in such regard Kxcupt In tho nature of a contract iigreud upon by the purllcs. Upon this nubjcut their rlghlrt wero mutual. The uompuiiy hut] tho undoubted right to protoot its property; for mis purpoHK It uould lawfully employ us many men DM it HUW proper anil arm tJitttfl It noti'MHury. Tin; ol tho mon wu4 Lo lefUHC to work unlrKS their tcrnid were acceded 10 und porHuad') others to join them In such but llui law will HUH tain them no further. Tho momc-nl they ut- tempt to control the works, ami to prudent by violence or threutttut vloleiica olher In from Kolnif to work, then tticy placed thcm- sulvea autnldc the piLlrj of the Imv. nan rial liu tolerated for it momont tint uno Idboror Hay to another laborer: 'You not work lor thin miin for that wugc without my and then enforce Much cttinmiind by Uiutal vio- lence upon his per ton, "You will obdurvu thill tho offense oliurifpd IH treason agft Inn t the Mtatft, ftnd not uKilliiHt United Slatea It !H a matter wllti whluh Iho latter bus nothing; to do unJ over It nin have no J U rind 1 nil on. A mprc niob, collr'uli'd uponthp ImpulBc of the innrueiit. wltlmui tiny deflclleobjccl licyotitl tlioirriitillLiittorMfi limtud' den not com ink trr-itsou, .1 it hough it dcntroyft property ;itid itlarkH hununj llrt. But when a Urge; number of tii'-tj acin Aid or- thsmiclveH anil In com- mon purpose to rtcfy lln- roMfit its offlccri nnfl rtcprlrc f'-flDilf-dll- zcnw of the rlifhis to wlilth thiiy tilled uniltir 1h'_ coMtftUtlou anrl It It v, feylnK of war against the tttmto, ottuiw. ii Vfhert; ft body til hnvc organ I 'or a vntj step which any one at tneai MkM Ib pwt n> ecu Li "ti of Hi' ir eommoti purpoM tl Mt atfrt act of UsttHon. Krciy imimMrtrf who KEEPING IT OREEN. Honor kr Vl.lllBK JtU (V-t, pevple who took la Sunday's demoiislratkm tn honor of the Omrles S. Pariwll in number those who irttemlsd his fuuerthl it year ago. Thouatitnlt. of rlMtort, to city from Cork, lialwtiy wudtlie worth of Ireland. Floral ID the form of harps other wero ro- from politlciil bodies the country. Hllcd nit'iaovlal cur nud two Tim pro- to I'ttrncll's tomb won uccum- punied by bunds nnil forporut inns ot bt in tiud Cork, who uttoniU'd ia ntntff. J, J. U'Kdlly dtilivoivd till lion thu A KILUNQ FROST. i Jujurtiil ii Miup IN CttntrHl llliiiiilH. 111., Oct. 11.--. The Hrst killing front of tlio MCUSOU in-t-urn-il in cuntt'tiL Illinois Siidtrtltty nitrlit. and vetfettttiou of all wn-s injnrtsd. The muviiury to ill ilcpivea. let" >vus foriui'fl htt thiul; us window uml out iloon w 1 th f nwt, A 1 1 were killed. H is tlutt little if uny tin mayo vvtut to the corn. Although tho wu dduveil UO per cent, ol' nil ttiu dorn wus Ijayontl injury from frust. The yield la this mul surrounding coiintloa will be about of u full crop. trmflure 111 llrltitlii. LONDON, Oot 11. In eoumiuntlnf upon u speclttl nucount of the condition of IlHtisl} crops KB piibllnhcd in its uol- umnH, thfr Timtfi tutyfi: Thu oonc'luslon on the whole i-utte is that tlie prugent yenr will be a dUaatroim one foi tho Urlttsh farmer. The chief low will bu In wheat, while thcro will be no ado quo to wtt-off In any other crop. The outlook for the winter la gloomy tor nil Knd it beooman it grm question how many farmers will be able to struggle through It (j'onnider- Hie continued of wheat cultivation, the Times ad vines fitrmen to turn their attention to hlgh-ulaai dairy produue. A Aa-nut Moll bed null PuiLADKLi-iHA, Oct 11 Drugged and robbed of all his money and jewelry, Cheater T, (Jrelnnmor, a prominent real estate agent of Tacotnu, Watih., WM found unconHcioun in the low dive al No, 435 Spruce street, and wta> re- moved to tlio Philadelphia hospital, where he died Sunday afternoon. Charged with having a htind in man's death, Hugh McDcvltt and Kate E barling were arrested and hold to CiltCAOo, Out. Mayor has issued a proclaniatton declaring Tluirsduy, October 20, a holiday in and for the city of Chicago, directing that all public offices be closed, HUd request ing that all buslnetiM bo subpemdad on that in order tlmt uitinen-i participate its actors ot1 Hpuclntot'fl in the jjrctit dainonetratlun In honnr ol tilt dedication of tlie World's Colum- bian exposition buildings, A. rimitnr PlNB BI.UFK, Oct. At 11 o'clock a. m. J. tl. Onlpcppnr, i nhot uml killed bi Stewart, who nctcri HM for Culpepper. The men over money mutters, nod when Cul- pepper turned to leavu JStctvarl lattur a, rflvolvcr utnl Ilrud Ihi bull striking Culpeppur in "Jut Imuk ol tho head, killing him iimtantly. Hlew- art wus ICIeclrln O., Oi-t. i During H fog two ftletitric mfjtnrn ind in collision, injuring two itiotormcii unil pna HI; liters Mutoj Hjuu'n were cniHhwd, anrl Motorman Hendurtori Mtd ernslrtd. manftRMT of terrlbtj body WM braittd. Both badly wrec Ftrf Weliverjr to four Jfore WASH ta'OTOs; Oct. 11. -The free delivery service been ordered at the following1 officer December 1: Austin, Tex.; 'Watertown, Independence, la., and Ahhtahula, 0, lu case any of these cities fail to comply with the reg- ulations as to posting1 names of and numbering- houses before Novem- ber 30, 1892, the order establishing ttw service will be rescinded as to plying1 aacri J OMAHA, Neb., Oct. 11. pned open the doors leading Into.K John's Collegiate Catholic cbumefc in-day morning and broke" safet, containing the church jewels. Articles to the ward of were stolen Of The following rtoyf ber oi ffanwi won J of the Xwttodtl   

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