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Hamburg Reporter: Thursday, May 9, 1929 - Page 1

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   Hamburg Reporter, The (Newspaper) - May 9, 1929, Hamburg, Iowa                             IE HAMBURG REPORTER Hamburg Republican Established 1870 VOLUME XXXV _ Hamburg at the Fremont County H. S. Track Meet Hamburg Reporter Established 1894 CONSOLIDATED WITH THE HAMBURG REPUBLICAN, JULY 2. 192S HAMBURG, IOWA, THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 9, 1929. :A few athletes went from the Hamburg high school to -Sidney Friday, where' they competed in, the Fremont county track meet) held there that day. Though en- tered in most of the and worn down by constant competition, these six men won two firsts, eight seconds and seven thirds to place third in the meet. They also won the 880 yard relay and second in the mile relay. Sidney won the meet and Tabor placed second in Class A competition. Farragut first in Class B division. The athletes from Hamburg com- peting in Friday's meet were: Dahl- gren, Phillips, Brace, Langston, Workman, McKean, C. Boldra, G. Btildra. Dahlgren won third in the 100 yard second in the 220 yard dasn, second in the shot put. Several of the other men won in their competitions. Summaries: 100-yard dash: Won by Penney, Johnson, Tabor, second; Dahlgren, Hamburg, third. Time, 220-yard dash: Won by Penney, Tabor; Dahlgren, Hamburg, sec Gave Towels to Best Room. The Lone Chapel Ladies' Aid presented the Hamburg Comfort Station with a sanitary towel hold- er and 500 towells this week, -which is greatly appreciated by those op- erating this rest room. The com- fort station was fitted out by sev- eral of the city and since opening has proved popular. It is a great aid to the woman of the surrounding country as well as out of town visitors and is well worth the cost of operating. The Done Chapel ladies are to be com- plemented for their spirit in help- ing to make better this service. Tcetens Here Friday Night. The American Legion will (rive their weekly dance on Friday, May 10, at the opera house. They have secured the Teeten to furnish the music on this evening, All those who patronize dances in this section of the country are well acquainted with the music that this orchestra puts out and know are. assured of plenty of _peppy musiif when "they "are" present. Train Wreck at Shen. A Real Old Paper. L-. A. Rees brought in a paper this week which is a real old timer. It is called the Weekly Times and published ill on March 20, 185C. Thjs makes the paper seventy-three years old. It is a nine column Kuuell Wins Third. Kusseli Case, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Case of this place, and a former Hamburg boy, who is now attending high school at Sbcnan- doah, won third place with his cor- net playing in the state music meet, which was held in Iowa City the years ora. n u past week. It will be remembered sheet of four pages and carried that Russell took first place in the national news and has several de-1 district meet held Bluffs partments or columns as the cur-j rent poetiy of that day, an agri- cultural column, political, interna- tional news, woman's column, fam- ily circle column, etc. This paper has been in the Rees family for years and was given to the father of L. A. and S. C. P.ees, at the time of its publication, by a stage coach driver by the name of Thompson. This was over in Guthrie county, Iowa, and at that time Mr. Rees, Sr., was operating a stage coach line. recently. This is the second year that he has competed in the state contests and both times he placed third. He is an accomplished mu- sician ami'- broadcasts regularly from KF-S'P at Shenandbah. He also plays in the Craven orhcestra, which broadcasts from that studio and plays for dances, etc, in this section of the state. Sunday School Convention. There will be a convention at Reporter Bird House Contest Next Week On Friday afternoon, May 17 and Saturday afternoon and even- ond; Johnson, Tabor, third. Time, dash; Won. by.. Travis.. Sidney; Bruce, Hamburg, second; the Sunday schools of Fremont ing, May IS, there will be a dis- eounty at Randolph, Thursday, I play of domestic science and man 'IMay training Wmk-rf the-Knmbari Sunday schools of the county will schools, and the rural schools, i McKean, Hamburg, third. :56.0. Time, 880-yard run: Won by Benson, Sidney; Rittenburg, Sidney, sec- ond; Reeves, Tabor, third. Time, Mile run: Won by Benson, Sid- ney; Bennett, Tabor, second; Por- ter, Sidney, third. Time, 880-yard relay: Won by Ham- burg; Tabor, second; Sidney, third. Time, 120-yard high hurdles: Won by Pennev, Tabor; McDaniel, Sidney, m.-cuiiu'; Weaver, Tabor, third. Time 220-yard low hurdles: Won by Travis, Sidney; Weaver, Tabor, second; Langston, Hamburg, third. Time, :2B.l. -Milo relay: --Won Time, Pole vault: Won by McDaniel, Sidney; Hamburg, second; Workman, Hamburg, and Weaver, Tabor, lied for third. Height, 10 feet. Shot put: Won by Penney, Tabor; Dahlgriin, Hamburg, sec- ond; Doldra, Hamburg, third. Dis- tance, .10 feet 11 "j inches. An open switch in the yards at Shenandoah caused a bad wreck at that place Saturday morning and injured several people. The morn- ing passenger train on tho Q branch line had sust left the station at Shenandoah on its trip to Red Oak, and came to the open caused them to hit the caboose of the northbound freight No. 98, which was in the yards there at that time. Conductor W. H. Longstreet, of Red Oak, was in charge of the pas- senger train and had just started to take up tickets, standing in tho aisle facing the rear of the train, when the collision came. Ho was thrown against the door of the car with such force that the panel of the door way -broken by hifi body. His back was badly wrenched and he received several bruises about MB person. He wus given medical attention und later taken homo re- covering from his injuries. Mrs. A, 11. I'orkins anil tin. Jew Owe, of Farmirut, wore nisi) oii train be represented. The program will begin at S a. m. and will last throughout the day. There will throughout the day. There win occupied by 0. C. Johnson, on be a picnic lunch at noon and in door south of the Central Market they desire to make a display, in the Cummins building, formerlj occupied by 0. C. Johnson, on the evening there will be a tional and musical program. Mrs. R. F. Hickman of this place is in charge of the'Educational de- partment this work in the county and in the morning will give an ad- dress on, "Some Contributions of Christian Education to the Church." She will also have charge of the This is in connection with the Hi; porter bird house contest. Th public is invited to attend and vie-, the exhibits. The" grade nrches tra will also be on hand to play io the event. This is free to every- one, and it is hoped that many wi avail themselves of the opportur ity to view the work of the school leadership training work during tho i jn' these departments, conference period in the afternoon. County Musical Festival The Fremont County Musical Festival, held under the spcmorship of the Kiwanis club, was held in the high school auditorium Wednes- day evening, and was greeted by a jttioso entering in'.in, nui. ii .u fair house. Musicians tl10 to sell their entry, and elfo Tabor, Thurman, Farragut, Sidney, socurl, a H.iinlmrir RrlinOIS. __...._. ...1 and were thrown Hie .'-.cat m front iver the hack of if them. They were somcwiuit bruised but not Koriuiudy 'hurt. Tho engine of the passenger train, but did not turn over mid the v The bird house contest and dis play will be judged and of 53, ?2 and SI will' bs mad judging being based on workman ship, design und finish. This con test is open to any boy or girl o school age, and docs not necessu ily have to regular school wnr houses remain the property i entering them, bul if ai engineer Javelin throw: Won by bills, Tabor; Silton, Sidney, second; Laird, Tnbor, third. Distance, feet 11 inches. Droad jump: Won by Penney, Tabor; Phillips, Hamburg, second Langnton, Hamburg, third. Dis- tance, 18 feet. High jump: McDaniel and Sit- ton, .both of Sidney, tied for flrrt and second places; Boldra and Langston, both of Hamburg, tied fireman were Randolph ami Hamburg schools, mimberiiifj over SCO, took part. The program was varied, composed trf'irlce clubs; orehertran, vocal ftitrumcntal nrid endinjr-wlth the grouping of the clubs, some J50 voices, in one selections. Tho Hamburg grade orchestra und glee club made Ihi'ir first public apeparnnci', and brought forth much pr.-ilse. They have only ecure a huye Get into this contest and sho what you can do. Arrangements ttmdo for a ghuio Carrie Lair Bragg. Went to Des Moines. The typing and shorthand teams the Hamburg high school went Des Moines, Friday, where they ok a part in the contests of the hools of the state. Hamburg as represented in al! four classes f competition, having won in these epartments at the district meet eld in Hamburg recently. The students making the trip nil the class in which they com- eted are: Amateur shorthand, Or- s Smith, Eleanor H. Porter and Isie Louise Stacy; amateur typ- ig, Ruth Good, Eleanor H. Porter nil Elsie L. Stacy; novice short- anil, Maxine Miller, Marguerite ude and Hazel Xelson; novice typ- njr, Maxine Miller, Marie Castle- lan and Hazel Xelson. The complete returns of the con- ests have not been received by the acuity of the high school as we 'o to'press, but from what could e learned at Des Moines before the earns came home, they ranked high n the competions and are very ,-ell satisfied with the showing made here. thought have -been made by the students han in the district contest here. At this meet the Hamburg high school was the only school in the district to win a place on all four classes and the only one entitled to place teams in al! four classes at Installed New Counter. Louis E. Carroll, proprietor of the Market Basket, has installed a new refrigeration system and now has 'his grocery store equipped with the latest fixtures in this line. It is a large counter, which is cooled by electricity, guaranteeing an even temperature at all times. He :has made some material changes in the store, placing the new cooling counter across the back of bis store, where he keeps all of his meats, butter, cheese, and etc. To the rear of this he has in- stalled a wrapping counter, which will aid materially in his sen-ice to s customers and give the clerks n opportunity to put up the orders nicker and much easier than be- >re, as well as affording a system- lie manner of handling the trade uring the busy times. The Hamburg; Schools Will Soon Come to Close shaken up a bit. Tim caboose of the freight train was thrown against the rar In front of it anil was bmlly damaged by the crash. Mrs, Scott Dies. 0. U. Scott, of liivorlon, sister of Mm. William Welch and Charles Monk, of Hamburg, away :it her home in Kivorton, hist Wednesday. Mrs. Scott hud been ill poor health' for many months and for the past ten weeks lias been bwifast. Sarah Elizabeth Monk was born in Harrison county, Missouri, Aug. 1H07, ami passed away at her home In Ulvcrloii, Iowa, May 1, aged 61 years, H months anil 27 days. She hail spent a greater part of her life in lliverton. She was united in marriage to 0. D. Scott, January 1884. She Wo often hear of rain attacking to mourn her departure her cats mid other animals, but organized since lust fall. music was of very With for third place, inches. 'Height, li'fect 8 Discus throw: Won by C. Bol- dra, Hamburg; 0. Boldra, Ham- burg, Bccon.l; Penney, Tabor, third. Distance 101 feet '.z inch. Hats Put Up Fight. order and was convincinir evidence thiil music in the schools is a worth while feature. It was n won- derful sight to see spcndid young people gathered together for an event of thin kind. The total receipts from tho "onlcrtnlnninnl was divided among tho different schools. it is'not often that they make any determined resistance with a hu- man. Last Tuesday morning was an exception at the Sullivan eleva- tor, when Chark-s Ln Port was feeding the last of a bin of corn there. As the pile tecanie small- er, the rntx Iwcame more numerous, whctlvr they took courage with the knowledge of tlu'ir number or whether they won; just making a just minute stand wtaii cornered is not known. NVvcrthcIoss sin-era   hj ilm. He Is an expert in his line ind should find a large practice li this community. We welcome- Mr ind Mrs. Shepard to ouMiUlc city Sullivan Elevator Sold. Ihc last. l services were nilucted On Tuesday of this week ,T. B purchased the elevator an' coal property of Flo Sullivan, an took possession of the new prop urty this morning. Since the los of the Xuck elevator by fire ho ha been handicapped in caring for th grain part of the business, and liu made plans to rebuild, when the portunily to purchase came of of tho bin, and as a result thi' tor is minus several of the t iliem with his rake, -while others were forced to iru through with the 'c-f.rn W llis sh-iier. DiHlotadil Shoulder in I1'1'11- Mrs. Dan Graham, "f near I er- cival, fell Hunilay morning m n manner as to dislocate her shoul- der. Klio was feeding ''hickeni- nt Ihelr farm homo and in some way her fool, which her suddenly to tho Hour "f the house. Her back was aim badly wrenched from the fall nnd she is miff'-rimr considerable pain, from the Injury. V. I'. L'. fo Itally. Members of the U. t> Daptisl church will (to to Councl Bluffn Friday, for the mid-yen rally of the Southwestern mwi Daiitlttt [waoelaUon. I'UCOrai Services wuri: at tho Church of Christ al River- -Inch woifc to an advanlag ton, Friday, May IfllSI, at 2 p. in., conducted by liov. N. Gil- lett, of Hamburg, assisted by Hcv. ill enalile Mr. to gi'l goin full blast mui'll oarlicr, and I. I', tii-inyoi- of llivorton. A i'ti'l siinit tlm'O Iwaullful Bongs t tiio son'irc. '.vas nnili- in Mnunt Xion ooniotory. At Slininl Xlon Chilrrb. Xoxt Sunday will bo a big day at mo loss olevator in ti town. Tho business is undor ll also ntakp inaiiiiitiMiionl of F. C. Moad, wl has had years of experience in tl business, and is favorably known ovnr thi.-. country. Mr. Sullivan lias not announced his plans for the future, in fac Tho remains of Mrs. Carrie Bragg, a former resilient of Ham- rg, was brought Ui Hamburg for iriai, arriving here hist Satur- y. Mrs. Bragg bad passed away her homo in Angeles a few .ys previous and her desire to be uried in the Mount Olive conic- ry at this place wan fulfilled him her son, Ralph, and daugli- r, Leona, accompanied the body, ire. Mrs. Dragir was the widow of r. T. H. who practiced ledicino in Hamburg for a num- er of years nnd in the early his- jory of' the town was one of llm vie and social loaders here. Shu Hie daughter of 51 r. and Mrs. wiioch Lair, who were of the pinn- er stock of this country. Thyrza Caroline Lair wan bo n Lincoln county, Kentucky, Octo- ler 22, 1K52. Hor family niovci 0 southwestern Iowa when slu vas five years of age nnd her girl lood ilays were spent in am! neai lambnrg. She joined tho Muiin' Olive Baptist church at the age o ixteen. She was married October 25 1873 to Dr. Thomas Howard Dragg 1 prominent physician of Ham burg. They moved to Austii Texas, in 1K3IJ, where Ihcy mad .heir home for several years. I the late OO's Dr. Bragg moved t Mexico for the benefit of hi health and died there June His body is buried at Guadalajara Mi-x., in the beautiful America cemetery at that place. The las seventeen years of her life, Mr Dragg spent in Los Angeles, Calif where she died April 28, at tho age of 70 years, r. months anil 0 days. She leaves four children, Idella, of Los Angeles; Hubert, of F.i Paso; and Ralph and Leona, also of Angeles; one brother. M. :1 Lair, of this phu-o and Mattie U-n A. Lair, of Chowrhiiia, Calif. a line, i.'liriiiliail life and was ail example and in- spiration to ail who know her. SI Refund to Fremont County County Auditor R. R. Armstrong las some of the strongest argu ment for the voting of the bond issue, whicU is being voted to day, in the form of 7-ecords in tha office. On Apr! 17, before th' petition was even presented to tb1 board for the election h had received a refund of from the state auditor for inter on the county bonds which hnv brcn previously sold. This inter ost. is paid from tax un tho sab: o gasoline ami tho automobile lie In addition to this tin.' record? i the auditors' office shows tha Fremont.county in IMS. receive OiM.O-N.fifHn refunds for the con ruction of highways, bridges nil maintenaim? of same In th year. When wo rumpai ..s to tho amount uf taxus i o of gasoline and auto li nsos this looks mighty Kimd for mil Is There wait P. E. 0. Entertained. The P. E. 0. held their annual lather's Day meeting at the home f Mr.-. W. S. James, Tuesday, at time some twenty-five of the Ider ladies were guests of the and were royally entertained V tlicmT A playlet, "How It was resented by members of the club mil was greatly enjoyed. It was a ake-olf on gossip and humorous ketches were quite amusing. Miss Catherine Mitchell sang a solo, "Old ''ashioned Mother of Jline." At he close of the afternoon's pro- gram, delicious refreshments of sandwiches and tea were served by- he hostess. Hand bouquets of lowers were used as favors. Held Missionary Tea. The Missionary society of the M. E. church held their mite box open- ng .tea at the home of Mrs. S. James on Wednesday aflenloll of week. Short talks were given by Menlamcs C. E. Danforth, C. M. Workman, A. K. Wanamaker, Wm. Van Lnuven, Fred W. Hill. Lee Smith, .lay Kirkemlall, Whit Good, II. D. Coy and Mifis Ethel (inod, taking up different phases of the v.-jrk. A playlet was also given, '.he. Home Guard girls taking part. The second opening of mil. boxes rtjllco" fir" 'of fSS- A. enjoyable time is reported. ;ho Mount church and all an invited In attend and participate in !io services. At 10 o'clock there will lie Sunday school anil preaching orvk'os will be conducted at the isiial hour. Foll'iwiitK the uiorn- ng services there will bo a basket dinner at the ehuivh, ami in the tftornoon baptismal services will lie eld at the river west of Itivorton. Caught l-'.levell Wnlvi-H. Frank Callalmii caught eleven wolf cubs last Tuesday (in thi! Hoy Carpenter farm east of Hamburg. They were quite small, but Mr. Callahan received four dollars each an bounty on Ihem. hail i "r fll- work, l-'nr more than thirty- Ing, and I IK- deal was mad" so suddenly thai ho lur five years Mr. Sullivan iileiitilied with tlio grain in llninburg, hip many May 1, and tl Hint in' will decide to remain llamhurjr, wlioiv in these taxes in th tunty darliiK which it is an to see, shown that this enmity iroivoil more In umls than they paid in taxes. This u din-el result of the former ond iiisuc and nhouhl it luit have itoii tin- would avi: been spent in some other ounty. Wo just BOL about 00 of taxes jiaid by some county hat did not vote bonds as well as 11 of our taxes paid in that year baek to us. Should we ill! the bonds today the same will 10 true next year. Mr. Armstrong wrote Mr. C Coykondall, the administration en- gineer, concerning the amount that rill be refunded under the pnwp.nl >onil issue and that gentleman ro- ilied that we would received an- nually ti> llnancc our bond ssuo. Mr. Coykendall writes follows: Ames, Iowa, May 1, U. H. Armstrong, County Auditor, Sidney, Iowa. Dear Receipt if acknowledged of you letter of April afith., in which yoi ask IIH to the amount that will b annually available on the area al lotment basis to take care of in teresl and principal on primarj road bonds in Fremont county. Fremont is practically the size as Page county and 1 rfi cenlly had nceasion to (igure ou >a ile'liiil si-hedulo in eonnectio 'with a bonii issuo in Page count: and found that I'lico enmity coiil hamlle a total "f bot lo jirineipal and intori'st an finanre same wluilly fmrn primal mail funds. On the basin of present ri-reip in tho primary road fund and ta! 'ing no credit redm-liun it A Bad Auto Wreck. Monday morning Will .mil Kdwunl Day driving on No. .1 between Kidney and Tabur, lieu their car turned over while lint; down a hill. Mr. Grass- ier was fortunate in escaping oriour injury and survived the rock with only a few minor scrat- and bruises. Kdward Day, ,wovor, suffered severe hicora- onu of the face and head :IK lie as thrown through the windshield f the ear. The injured youth was taken te lie Hamburit hospital, whore he given medical attention. Hi.s nee was badly cut nnd bruised re- uiring oved twelity stitches to sew p the wounds. He also suffer- .1 a broken collar He is uffcring considerably and will no oubt bo incapacitated fur soino- imo. The car was badly wrecked the accident. The end of the present school term will soon be here and already the youngsters may be heard tell- ing how long it will be until the last session, when vacation will start. If you want to know just the number" of days, ask any boy on the street, for he has it all _fig- ured out and can answer you "right otf the bat." The high school activities are drawing to a close also and the. upper classmen are busy making arrangements for the coming com- mencement week program. This is the last week of school for most of the seniors and their work from now on .will be confined mostly to their commencement activities. On Sunday, -May 19, the bacca- laureate sen-ices will be held at the high school auditorium, Rev. William Bueliler, pastor of the Evangelical Zion church will de- liver the baccalaurete sermon to the graduates this year. On Tuesday ami Wednesday eve- nings, May 21 and 22, the senior at-fw high school auditorium. The play selected by them this year is, "Square and the cast has been very well chosen from stu- dents of" the class. They have been rehearsing for sometime and Harold Kirkpatrick, of Omaha, has- been secured as coach. On Thursday evening, May 23, the commencement exercises will be held at the high school auditor- ium and a mixed program is being arranged. There will be two one- act plays presented by the stu- dents of the high school as well as- musical and the regular numbers of the commencement programs. The graduates will also receive their diplomas on this night. The program on this night in free to all. On Friday, May 24, the annual Alumni Haliquet to the graduates will be held nt the high sclural building. This is the climax to Uio open house held on that day by the alumni; There arc forty-nix graduates in Wra class thiii'vear and larg- est to be completing high school course. They are as folluws: Mildred Ackley, Sebiia Ander- son, Heniieo Drown, Kvelyn Drown, Mcrlban liruno, lOlinora Case, Marie Castle-man, Frank Coplcll, Ruth Ci'Slell, liulli. Cummins, Stanley Cummins, Okla Dahlgren, Hertha Piivissun, Carl Di-iini.-i, Doom' Finh- or, Rus-Rcll Flelchor, Lilah J-'nialcr, Mildred Golden, Itu'.h Good, ICulii Hale, llarec Han-is, Alma Jaockcl, lioulah .lohnmin, Walter Kirkemlall, William Kubcl. Wayne Langston, vii'o-presi'leiit, Helena Lesley, Uus- Hcll Luckett, Neva Lyons, John Miller, Kloannr Porter, secretary- treasurer, Dillic liageth, Jean Carl Heiil, Charlotte Hlc-h- Sieve Scott, Mario Slaylon, Orvis Smith, Klsle Stacy, president, Arnold Slrmiir, James TiniK'll, Amil Ward, Kllen Waters, Donald Wilds, Inna Xach, Haw-l Riverton Girl Honored, devoted mother, ever lov- kind, .....nfortiiig. She ineinoi-y. eld ill Los Ani'i- body brought In .ervii-es wore h'-ld In Haniliurg. ICnipyrean Liinclieon. eMlanie.i H. Stowart, Dana P. Long, Klza James and L. 11. l-'or- nytli wore hostesses to tho Empy- rean club at thi! liome of Elza Jamen on north Argyll! Btroet, Wed- nesday, to n onn o'clock luncheon. The ladles report a very peasant lime. at Mount Oliv- ooniolory, .Sunday, May fi, oon.lurted Rev. J. .Stapio.s, of tlio HamlilirK ISaplinl i-liun-li. Kin- rests in Mount Olive bosido hor father, Enm-li '1. Lair, nnd her inollier, Lnry Slapp Lair, Nothing us lose cimfldonn In UiR fcmlnlno raco as a Ihn viow of a fal wiiin.'ili'.i knoo from the rear. Lonaiiro i-ii-ts, whieh will on-i'.r a.slliv aro enmploli-d, tin-.-'- is ivailalile fur lin.inring bonds in Alllen Spoke to Kiw.-mis. J. S. Alllen was the principli peaker nt the meeting of tiiu Ham- iuri{ Kiwanis eluli, last Thursday and irave a very intercst- ng talk to the men. He Hie relationhhip between thi! city iml country people and of the ac- tivities that aid in bringing the two together for closer association ami co-operation. The dull found his talk inlornsline and entertaining and felt thai they hail received sumo very good pointers from him. Mrs. T. T. Brown Injured. Karly Friday morning Mrs. T. T. Drown'was seriously injured while working at the factory of tho (Ho- Fund Produets company. She was assisting in the unloading of cans and was working oh some seaf- fol.liliir at the linn-. During her work altomptoil to turn quick- ly and lor.l her which to fall on tiie floor H.-.P-.KI e or six feet hi-inw. She jluiir on her left side am! fell .ui-ii a wav as lu lin-ak her loft t a uiinty npproxi Very truly yours, C. Cnyki'iidall. Adioiiiistratiun Kngino I he .-houlder wa.- very injured and the lady has been fi-'riiii; severely. In the do ut- oont I" thf llnor her hem! a mail tiin'k nl.-iiidiiiir nearliy, whieli inHii-l.e.l :i bad hrili.-o lu her head. was taken at once In the llaui- the Won From Anderson. Hamburg base ball team wonl to Anderson Hunduy and won from tin- team at tluit plan: by Uuy Carpolltl-r Duys HOIIK liny' Carpenter this week the will play al Hlu.-liaildoah next fill day afternoon. chased tho Suialloy homo on upper G atreet. 1. K. Frnsl family occupy the home at this time. Miss Marian .Morgan, of liivcr- toti, who graduates from Simpson- college this spring, -has been .signal- ly honored during her senior year at Hurt, school. Klie was chosen at the beginning of the school year prei-hleiit of the Phi Mil Gamma sorority, and has served In that capacity the past school year. This week she was sent by that sorority as a delegate to tile national con- vention held in Boston the past week. In addition she now has the sig- nal honor of being elected grand president of tlio sorority. The Phi Mil Gamma is an honorary fra- ternity of professional dramatics and tiie honors that Mis.-: Morgan has received from them is much lo )ior credit. She is also a niein- uf I lie Pi Phi sorority. Miss Morgan will teaeh and KiiKlish in the Klliotl, Iowa schools tho eext year. Madison l-'arm Iliireati. Tin- MadiMui Kami will hold Ihi.-ir the .Muwiti i-huirh, Weiini-Mlay evoiiing, May A fur tin- meoliiiK. On- uf th- fea- tures this prugrani will h- lilay, "Tin- Hull's pre'-i-nleil llllilel the dinrti.....it Mi.-.-i Kula Kucli family i. asked to liring pie or :-and- wii-h-s. Kveryuno is eordially in- vited tu he pn-.-enl. Mother's Day. Hay evoninij at tlio Church "f Christ a pageant, "The .Mother's of will lie giveK by tho mothers. The niu.-ic will be Mother's Day mu.de. All an1 iuvileil to attend this .-erviro hi honor of mnther.   

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