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Weekly Times Newspaper Archive: June 27, 1861 - Page 1

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Publication: Weekly Times

Location: Dubuque, Iowa

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   Weekly Times (Newspaper) - June 27, 1861, Dubuque, Iowa                               W f t y t f 1 x 4-MB. J i VOLUME IV.r-NXX 49. 1 H V f 'f j 4 .4 A i F I I t V PUBTTQUE. THUBSDAYi JUNE 1861. NTJMBERS200. -Art HTMI FOB A f LAO-BAIIIMe. juaain mosca stowi At tot ralftM of tto start and itripas oter Andorsr Bemlnaryf on tbe Mh. tbe follow log .written for the occasion by Mri. H. B. wai mag to UUM of Here whers our fiithen Bearing the holy flame To light oar Hear where with laithand prayer reered theee wall in Now to tbe beaTeu to fair Their flaf we imlfs. Look where free it Over their hallowed BleMf OK their Now ptedgt jour heart and hand. Sou of a noble Bound this bright flag to ttand. Till deathto keep. God of our now To Thee we oar Jndve and Let banner wave Till there be not a fihow thjrMlfttroitf to Unto the end. THE LEOI8LATURE BEpOBD. The State Register of the 19th Con- tains a history of the vote on the loan. We reproduce it in a slightly condensed form. After the fall of Fort Sumter many of the leading Democrats in this State professed throw away political end unite with the Republicans In an vigorous support of the Federal and State Administra- tions in prosecution of the war. Wishing to reciprocate this apparent political magnanim- the Bepublican members of the General Assembly at the late Extra Session elected Democrats to about half the offices in either and for the accomplishment of the work of the Session were willing to throw aside political flow did the minority meet this exhibition of Of course the important measure of the Ses- sion was an act authorizing the issue of State Bonds to raise a War Fund for the HQW did the Democrats fulfill their promises to furnish the Governor all the material aid necessary for a successful prosecution of the The following transcript from the Journal of the House will show. The loan bill being under In Sec moved to fill the Mr. McQuinn an k .with of Louisa. moved w Mr. Kellogg moved Mr. Bremner moved moved moved Mr. of moved Mr. Dennison moved The question then recurred on filling the highest t I The yeas and nays were and 12 Bepublicans and 2 DemocraU and voted in the the rest of the House in the negative. The question then recurred upon filling the blank with The yeas and nays were and 26 Bepublieans and 2 DemocraU Voted In the the rest in the negative. Mri Bereman moved to pottpone the fur- ther contideration of the bill ontil Friday morning at 9 o'clock. Mr Jennings moved to amend by laying the bill upon the table until both had acted upon the military bills. Mr. Cutts moved to lay the motion on the table. The motion to lay on the table was lost The amendment of Mr. Jennings with- drawn. The motion of Beremaa was lost Mr. Ellis moved to adjourn. Lost The question them recurred upon the mo- tion to fill tin blank with which was lost. Twenty-eight Bepublicans and 2 Demo- craU as voted in the affirma- tive. The question was then taken on filling the blank with when it was Republicans and 4 DemocraU voting in the affirmative. Mr. Claggett moved to reconsider the vote just for the purpose of if pos- a unanimous vote. Mr Clargstt moved to fill tbe Wank with On this motion tbeyeas and nays were or- and were as The yeas Messrs. Be- Bowdoin. Brem- of of Cal- of of Lee. Mitchell. Merrill M ffcalk. Price. ft of Wright aftd Mr. Tbe nays Messrs. Beal of Dss of oTWami-tt. All That UMTS sfcoaU have beea winioa as to the prabe Ifurethe Loan aboaU bs Ited is Ml bat alter it domoosifatet iacoatestiMy that evea the Meat fer tbe Stale for the next six asoatha wwU Varying from' to how gtatendect friend of the State or Katlonal jidmlnUtratlons coriiliUntly vote to restrict the resources of tbe State to a sum less than Half a Million of Dollars t Yet the very men in the Democratic ranks who had at the opening of the session declared themselves ready to pledge the credit and resources of the State of b6th in men and money to any amount and to every to uphold the proved them- selves unwilling to vote for even the smallest practicable and on the final pi of the bill appropriating Twenty- Pour of them voted Throughout the entire session the fact was palpable that as a Party they were opposed to a vigorous prosecution of the and sought by pro- posed Border State Commission and al Conventions to patch up any sort of a no matter how humiliating or illusory it might Far be the intention from us to do sny in- dividual or any party wrong. But while there are a few Bepublicans who seem willing to commit the administration of State and National affairs fc Democratic it is right that the record of Democratic votes during the late Extra Session of the Oeberal Assembly should be fully known. With this record and the openly-etpressed sympathy of almost the entire Democratic Press with the enemies of the Federal we are not yet quite willing to concede that the Re- publican organization has fulfilled its sion and is ready for This War in due time will be the People of the insurgent States will be glad to return to their allegiance. Then will come up anew the question whether Slavery shall be National- or whether the limitations placed upon it by the Fathers of the Government shall be and the Republic become ultimately in fact what it is in the asylum and the home of Free and the ttgifl of free r The treason mill here in Dubuque grinds slowly. J. backed water the wheel a few days Judge CLAET did the same thing now about fifty Democrats right here in follow suit in a They have addressed a protest to the Democratic State Executive Committee protesting against Mr. Muiorr'fl right to make a call. Here is the Dei Polk Co. Mahaska i DubuqueOo. Claytot r I 2b Democratic State Henry Sodtt Co.. H. W. IM H. H. Davis D. Sigouraeyi Debatur Go.f H. M. Bioui Woodbary J.M. J. BL1 D. A. A. P. C. Bdone Co. The members of the Demo- cratic residing in the County of Du- protest ftgftftst the call for a State Convention on July made by D. A. as Chairman Ism. of the State as published in the Htrmld newspaper of the 8th of which he is editor. We are of the opinion thai the time desig- nated for the assembling of the 4 is premature and inopportune. Congress will meet on the 4th of but nothing im- portant will probably have transpired by the tenth inst. The future policy of the country will not be and U would be denying ns a great advantage to hold oar Convention so near the meeting of Congress that we could know nothing bat conjecture as to the mo- mentous issues that will be brought before that body. between the time desig- nated and the day of many events might and facts be brought to properly aflecting tbe action of the Convention. There is no in any that the Convention should be hrfd at so early a day. The time between tbe date of thecall and the meeting of the is too short The call could notmck the distant parts of the State in season to enable the Township and County Conventions to assemble and appoint their delegates. The consequences would be inasmuch as voting by wosy is that the Counties would not be felly and equally represented in the Slate Convention. The undersigned an more ready to appeal to the committee in as much as they believe that this call is made without your or authority. We do not know what power may have been riven by the Committee to tndr but Mr. Mahony doss not make the call ns Chairman of tbe but nsChalrsMnfm teas. only. If he proper' hold that without express authority tbe be can make that oaf L We understand Mr. Mahouy claims to to acting unto au- thority derivoi from Mr. Atantft your late tot InusnMMh as to left f SOSM vesta for FIWs we it with theOoesmtttee who stall be jour Wo also unasmaul that Mr. Mahouy told no oonflmnoa with the Com- and that therefore hk action b vol- untary and UMUthorMalivo. Wo feel that In the tmeot crisis M sups should to Ukon without delitoiution and cam. Wo also protest agaiast theefcrtof Mr. aeuag ns Chairman In Jtetiflng a fiatfsm tor Jto ttpou great consUturtoual and political f Mt wouM to JJPMSSS it trnovers instead of being merely the The power of oiaklaf ana Muluf pestflois tor tto toloofs to the repreicntativcs of the as expressed through No his can arrogate to himself any such right For these reasons we protest against the Lincoln 8 M Wm A Jor- HS Henry J B Edward AH H T B A Gep W H JoBepb D P 6 B Luther B E O FHet- DavidS WT GL Thomas Wm Horace T Fahmyt James G H H James Wm Wirt B G H Amos H C W John F A Charles Wm L George J 8 John L D Abram George Ord G B Jas F H Wm 8 only as to A as to time. June Nearly all the leading Democrats this except BEIT M have signed this protest. is too bosyhelping LIAKS in the chorus to to attend to such small what will result from this movement of DemocraU in this city remains to be To ns it is very gratifying to know that we have at least fifty Democratic neighbors who are more patriotic than and who will not endorse tbe treasonable acts of the self-appointed Mogul of the lowaDemocracy. It is understood that hundreds of other names could have been obtained here had the paper been thoroughly circulated. A Sharp Criticism omthe Great Affair. The Boston Journal publishes the following sharp criticism on the Great Bethel affair from the pen of in Of the sufficient to say that it was begun without any knowledge of the enemy's and so without any plan it was car- ried on without any each man fighting on his own attd it was ended fittingly by a tout and a during had the enemy been in condition they might have killed our men like sheep. And the retreat was ordered when the Massachusetts men had already partially gained the enemy's and wheti a' little more energy and perseverance would have given ns the victory. The enemy's position was masked in front by bashes mhd and iras flanked by woods and thus putcling a man who had a few rules to fight and could go no farther. Yet the retreat was the most unspeakably dis- graceful of all. A fresh regiment arrived Just before the retreat was ordered. Another was and yet in such a horiy burly did the men retreat that eight wounded one sick and two dead men left behind to the tender mercies of the to say of the stragglers. Nothingbut the cowaidiee of a band of tome eighty Vir- ginia honemen who porsoed saved a little squad of and ail these from being cut off. Nothing can express the sense of shame which every soldter here foeis. Item's name is a synonym for imbecility and the least the soldiers hen will be satisfied with is that be be recalled or compelled resign. Now I have told a dark and shameful but it is true every word of it. In bright re- lief to this is the conduct of many private. So far as there was any battle every man fought pretty much on his own and Massachusetts men and the Zouaves wen in the fon front Three of the four or five sachnsctts men who wen .killed fell on the very edge of the trench behind which tbe emy's riflemen wen standing. From this time on the cry of the men men from the regular army if he be only a Lieu- tenant to lead man whose bostaess His to we will follow him tmlber than any civilian oflcer. Had poor who was every man who died was wo wooU have taken the place doubtless with the kss of life. A sergeant who is an who has studied seven years in tbe military schools of baa held a msjor's commis- sion under fought with hisa ia Eu- rope and Sooth and MW carries four soars of wounds received in saakestbe following criticisms. It was a blander to take oat raw recruits at night. It was a blonder to start in the night with a force three times as large that of tbe It was a Mmitt to start off witboot a train park was la tbe fort. It WM a blunder to start off wbw the QcacnUMaet know tbe character of tbe poaitkm WM to attaefc. ItwMaMmdcr to start without for the Everything of that kind we were to piaafor ATOM tbe MMh men but tbk te woogh Tovrs traly. J.BCiKT Tm Mwlyappoialsd 8mgeM Official of uUesit is a native of -----by rank to Uoa being al tbe bmi SatfWM rankinc He will beMebrwwdnwk will lUffMMlal Oolooito. Bisfmi MSW rssipioa vis He WMa D Fialey's test pro- place ytars am. so be bM bis Ths War Worth all it is an expeosive luxury. However humanely and discreetly is a serious drain upon the life of a nation. We shall COCQO out of the present struggle impoverish- ed in many ways. With tbe best success we shall expend buodfeds of millions of treas- ures and sacrifice thousands of lives. We shall feel the bruises of the conflict for many years after the rebellion has been crushed and peace has been restored. Thousands' of fortunes will be of homes will be made of bright careers will be arrested. The mourners will go about the streets. There will be sorrow and will be dispair that no human sympathy can many a gentle bosom. The wrecks that lie thickly around charred and battered ruins of high hopes and sublime attest how severe has beqn the trial through which the country hiu.pasied. Will it pay the cost thousand we come out of the struggle conquerers 1 If we succeed in crushing out this miserable we exterminate the fatal heresy of we shall be able to teach treason such a lesson as history will never weary of we shall succeed in convincing the world that WQ have a vigorous determined to overcome all combinations and whether from con- spiracies within or invasion if we shall be able to impress Christendom with the conviction that our Western empire is built upon a which no convulsion can shake and no tempest if we shall be able to do and to do it the no matter how long or how ately will be the cheapest enterprise upon which the nation ever embarked. Every drop of blood that has been dollar that has been purpose that has been.baulked and hope that has been fructify into future blessings. We shall emerge from the conflict stronger in all that goes to make up the life of. a great people. We shall resume the calm pursuits of chastened by the trial through which we have by the affliction with whicnwe have.betn visited. shall find oursalves elevated to a higher moral and quickened by. nobler impulses to performance of nobler deeds. We shall find ourselves more more more able to grapdle with future and avoid future dangers. We shall find ourselves leas bound slaves of toil and less grovelling in oar less eartbgy in oar aspirations. The suocessAl termination of the war will be the dawn of a new era in the history of the country. The Bepnblic will e.Urupon new stage of its career. The public heart will throb with more generous noller issues will engage the attention of statesmen. A loftier stand- ard of pnbftie morality will prevail. A bet- ter class of public will come upon the stage. Purer .aims and mow exalted conceptions of truth and will animate people. The sterling metal of oar wes- tern life purified as it were by ed from the dross thnt has ao long tanished its shine oat as U has never ahonj Evening JounaL V V irmt its They havenssai comprom Lst ths Lion j H From the June 19tb. The rapidity of movement and promptness of action which have market recent Military m Missouri on the part of tbe fed- eral troops under commafid of Brigadier General ipeafc In no uncertain tone of the eminent fitness of that officer for .the im- portant duties with which he ia Without waiting for the enemy to gather in provide a receive arms and throw up and by impunity of give secession the prestige of even cooault- ing that venerable volnme- of tightly bound twtth red which eyeryold fogy in the armv is supposed to carry in valiant little emu- lating the energy of and with such force ae be could and with such supplies as were in the military larder at SU started out in pursuit of the rebels and their judging .that in as in wins the day wha most vigorously backs his cause. Well done Gen. la these when the Old Man of the Mountain seems to ah astride of our every military when disorder reigns and inaction the his Napoleon- ic promptness IB worthy of our highest Admi- ration. We already see the results of the activity which Gen. Lyon has. displayed. Missouri is to-day virtually in possession of bis hand- ful of men. If they are not enough to extir- pate they wilt at least hold it in check until reinforcements come. erable body of rebel troopers and raaurauders nor even a respectable number of Border Ruffians can be gathered together without drawing tbe fire of his not a TTnion man can be harmed without subjecting tbpse who are guilty of the crime to a visit from the loyal men of the GeneraPa Not a field piece or any great number of mus- kets can be sent into the State to be against the without danger of seizure. J This is as it should be. The traitors of Missouri are learning what Virginia and ought long ago to have been tspght treason has its penalties as' well or .other crime. It is a son that will do them good.. Down to the day of Gen. Lyon's there .was no example anywhere of prompt and vigor- ous treatment of that malignant Bat he has set the inAugumted1 ac- tion upon a new and' at ita root. We trust that he wiU be to go on and consummate whit he flas tbat neither timidity nor apprehenrion of violat- ing the precedents wich tape detighti td .resoantt nor MiueatnishneM about Jiurring sbtkiebody's feelings or infringing some des- perate villain'i will cause tbe _ emmenu to hold brave men back. his and tarn r. One or two treasonable sheets in this which have chattered about are now doing their best to prove that some one has taken notice of their folly and thai a compromise maybe had. The trick is obvious the fetnity No one North or South desires a unless it be timid Union men who have been swept into the ranks of traitors al the and traitors who prateod to be Union at tht North. Straight out rebels at the South want to tght it oat. They compelled loyal mm at the North to accept the arbitrament of the sword. Tbe loyal North forbore and was divided till Santar and then ad- dmaeditself tothetask MOB made compromise impossible. What is there to What middle term between law-abiding and law- Formerly then were political and then compromises were not oat of place. Formerly there were conflict- ing and a umpire in Congress and the and then corn- premises not impossible. Bat now rebels have revolted from the mult of the ptftcefol arbitrament whersift tbw joined and shared tbe chances of soccers. They retired from wbeie they might have had a mnjoriiy. They tried to break up the Union. Thev trampled on tha Constitution. They bave token car have trampled on tbe nation's Thev are in rfally-etocted its ______r. is pomible Will pncicus pair of the ffnj fta Dsilf have the o staU what there to to be and wbo can be parties to a com- ia. Evea John Bell declares a rabel and bis a and be rs act does any em tbe lie term between revolution and tbe esn- of tbe lav of the land. UcosarefueecssM. or Uny are not. cessfal the but does not If tbe revolution is pat the government may be bat U csaaot Uoft UM rebel a aapalar A will be Mil moatbi Wim Mr. Joehaa bos bariei bis eAlirs oo4 Dsad Soldiers te he m fran Yorfc Sutoj Hews. Dr. well known as a sut embalming surgeon of yas receivea his commUsion as eurgeon in the United States to embalm tl may be killed in batU whose bodies it U desirable to transportation or other porpossik The Doct- it will be emtaltneii tbe partner of John Brown in the Harper's Ferry with great success. thinks he has knowledge of how Southern killed bodies should b e He has also operated very successfbTly in New Orleans and other fikrtUbern cities. The Doctor has received to report himself at Washington and will depart thence early this he will establish his headquarters titt ordered else- where. Preparations have beta tensive busi Tbe necessary apparatus has btf en mads for ambaTminf tbrse.oodUs at a and Aree of embalming fluid Jns.ve beenmade and will he carried to Washington bj tbe Doctor. This will embalm about nine dred bodies. The by which deed bodies are preserved by this process is to open an artery in the wrist aad inject a quantity of this fluid into the veins and arteries. The method is very simple and efffctual. We have seen bodies in a state of vation which were embalmed by this process eight years and are perfectly scoad hope the Doctor will not have occasion to the whole of his fluid tipoa the Federal army. expresses the hope that if employed upon any one of it wilt be no less a personage than Davis. He would take eepecial pleasure in injecting a very large amount of embalntiof fluid in his vaias aad radcring bim as rigid m a marble states _ ______ Mover mitma FAM Parrur- The rebels have bit aa way of raiitag tbe wind. Tbe Cbarlestoa that of the merchants in that city sabscribed four hundred dollars for tbe sapport of the family of tbe marderer of Tbe Cbwmr with a spiee of canning whkh wili readily be tbat mofisy has beta wfetly ia- in Confiederaledlale boads for tbe Tbto deeldedlv n cool It farnfebes means for carrying on the -ml the fiunily of murdered mav whistle fcf the neither tbe principal or ioUreft whtet they flrst aew wbeat of tbe ceitei al UM The price paid I __ FhiladelpbU with bis femfly.   

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