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Dubuque Daily Telegraph: Saturday, June 22, 1901 - Page 1

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   Dubuque Daily Telegraph (Newspaper) - June 22, 1901, Dubuque, Iowa                               FOKECAST. imbmiiti.- and vicinity: fair: continued warm and Sunday. BUSINESS HEN arc after circulation in The Telegraph tliey get it all VOL: LVI. DUBUQUE, SATU.RDAY: EVENING, JUNE 22, 1901. No 398 Stovo Open GOLDENEAGLE Store Opart Cvonlngs. ackward Season. Too Many Warm Weather Suits, That Tells the Whole Story, UGED PRICES To Reduce Number of Suits..... FIRST LOSS THE BEST LOSS. MANY ARE KILLED Seventeen Burned, Suffocated or Otherwise Killed in a New York Fire. PEOPLE JUMP TEOM THE WINDOWS Cyclone In Nebraska Kills by "Whole KlVcctH of Dynainlto Explosion, for :i number of suits that have been selling; at ten and twelve and Light colors, Checks, Plaids and Stripes. TRIMMINGS GOOD TAILORING GOOD MATERIALS GOOD Just the thing1 for business or work or day wear during the hot weather to come. For This Sals here's si Pickup, WO tloznn Mon's Half Hnso in solid colors, Kod, Blue, W.-ick Brown. Ususiietrloo ISc POP pair, fhis PIGK- lOc ftoi' Heavy Straws arc lighter, Brighter and than ovor. Coniv anil soo. Wo to .Tnrktonvtllo 'fidptl. Wasliliigtun, Jiiiu- state fili-ut ut' thv A. It. of Florida, Mrs. I'viinls Hasan, of Jacksonville, aiipcaln v> tli1.- chapters! throughout tin; cuun- try u> si.-iul to that placo In IH.-I- c'liru as iiiiiny sewing machines, liuw or sec- oml-iiaiul. aw can bo gathered. Num- of womon who have -bei'tl by the llro could rfuppyrt. and help oth'.-rM If those siuioliliiL-s wi-ru obtained. Any furni- ture or clothing also would be very rocelvjjd.______ __ Cnnnevled n Itnllway Crystal Falls. Mich.. Juut.> 'I'vd'has lio'-u recorded hero cimvi.-ylns t- .tolin H. Walsh, of Chlt-aito. an In- In it liiriie tract of ore land In county. This conveyance Is sup- to have some connection -with the proponed extouslou of the Wlscon- and Michigan railway from Faith- orn Junction northward. Ilor Wntoh Sinvad KniTllsIi. tnd., Juno Klla shot and slightly wounded UiM'k Thursday afternoon. Tho i iiii-x- of the uliiiotlni: said to bo Jeal- ousy. A watch, shattered by Iho bul- l--t.' probably saved ItO'.-k'n life. UutU women ar hero. I.tiinlii-r Worth liimn'il. Inilutli. Mifin.. Jnni- Klro tit tho sawmill of tho Tower I.umber com- pany, iii-iir I'.Llir In tho northern tin' comity, di.-stroyoil about worth of lumber. Tho bulk urvation ooruer to six-upy mi- land when It Is opened uro in dustltute butchers at Denver arc- boy- cotting IIOUSCH which deal di- rectly with the consumer. Thu llrst Methodist church at Omulin has pu11. a ban ou wouiuu's huts worn at church. of it tu i'oepko, I.olclit Co., I'Ni-tii 'rtinnU rin.-iiinutl, Juno r.ii'l Ciii-lm-to, tiii'in'bi.-M of the I'orto cuiinclt. won- li'-'i'o to r-.-.- Si-nutcir Fornker and to thiinU him lik olllces in behalf of thoir I.oft I'nrlt. t'nris. .linn. the Euro- t-i'prwiitatlve of Agulnaldo. has Klvi'ii up his apartments here1 and loft a v.-wl; iiuo tor Marseilles. It Is suitl I.-) returning to his own country. In lit M-ItU Francisco, Juno trans- Ohio has arrived from Manila v.-lth twoiity-nino oillcci'M and 750 men o' the l-'orty-sccond infantry. KE-WSFACTS' IN OUTLINE Irv.-in Held, of Chicago, n grad- B.it-.-. SIO.TOO to tho Shetllold school nt New Haven. It Is rumored In Berlin that Jumeu J. Corlwtt will give a series of boxing displays before the emperor. Arthur SchuiltTilertaH been expelled from the ranks of tho reservist officers Austria for ridiculing dueling lu a Wk. Joseph Chamberlain will visit tho United States In tho autumn. .TUe health otllcur ot Burnsvlllo, W. chained a passenger train to tho truck for Jive hours to compel tho rail way company to remove u car full of suinllpox pntk-ntH. Ten members ot a gang of alleged THE YKOMEN. Syracuse. Is'eb., June big homestead has been put In here by the Yyomen. ____ --------------O-------------- Krf. Unpin City. ltapl'1- Cky.- .luno tor- nado did hoavy (Inmngo several miles wost of this city, totally demolishing tho houses on the Little ranch which wero. occupied by F. N. Allen and his They reached a cellar In time to escape death. Groat trees wore torn up and carried many yards. The storm overtook tho mall carrier and a lady passenger coming from Silver City. The buaif.v demolished and he two had a niiinculoiiM i-scnpo. Tho torsos liavo not yet been found. MiithTluilr IHoivii Oil'. Colvlllo. Wash., Juno Henry Fish, .son of Colono! J. M. Fish, of Ket- tle falls, and Jame.n Aldrldijo were cllli.'d by mi explosion of dynamite In Iho inlin.' neat- horo. Their heads wore literally torn olY. I.oiulan, Juno W. Aster lias contrluuu'd Ci.OOO to tho Queen Vic- Lorlu lubllt'i- itursi's' -------------O------- Very Clump Smuiuor New York, Juno peo- ple are believed to have been killed and a number injured yestorduy as the result of it flre following an explosion among a iiuuntity of tireworks lu tlio store of Abraham M. Kitteuborg, at Patcrson, N. J. Tho store was on the Ki-ound iloor of a tenement building. Tlio cause of the explosion Is not known, nnd the property loss will not exceed I.lnt of Demi, Wounded nlltl Mining. Tlio bodies found up to tills writing arc: Mrs. LuclmUi Adamsou, Mrs. Charles Williams (burned whlloUo'lns to rescue Charles Williams (helpless- Harold Rlttcnburu 111) months, child of the. keeper of tho lii'eworks Willie Klsaasser (0 weeks Mrs .iiert Bamber, Uiunbcr. (U monllis Mrs. Andrew Klvln (bond only Mrs. Ann Uurns, Clarence Burns (li years Mrs. Annie Lamiigan, Mrs. Mary Duf- fy; total recovered, 12. The missing are: Joseph Elviu (2 weeks Mrs. Anne Fcntonuin, two nephews of Mrs. Annie- and Mrs. Mary 131- The Injured are: Mr. J, Jossup, bruised and burned; Mrs. J. Jessup, bruised and burned: I. Barnburner, head and face burnnd; Goorgo Sodor, head severely cut: Nicholas Hlllm.in, cut on head: Fireman Edward S. 1-lng- land. Injured by falling wall: Mr. and Mrs. John McGlono. burned about face nnd body. A uumbor of people re- ceived minor injuries, but went to their 1mm os. Stilt ml Grim Uonth. The explosion occurred .shortly after noon and many of the occupants of tin- building .wore out Jit dinner. The building In which' the explosion oc- curred was u frame tenement, four stories high, with stores on the ground iloor. The middle store 'was occupied by IMttonbcrg. Ton families occupied Hats'In the building. So great was tlio force of tho explosion that a boy play- ing in the street half a block away was lifted from Ills foot, hurled against an Iron fence and one of his legs broken. A trolley car was directly In front of the building when the ex- plosion occurred. 'IMio burst of flame blown out Into tho street scorched the sides of -the- ear nnd singed the h'uir of tho passengers. .Flro I.lko T.lKlitnlllK. A number of lho.se who were on tho uppor floors-of-the building when the explosion took place wero either stunned and-then burned to death or found escape cut off and wore suffo- cated. Evory window seemed to bo omitting (lume within a minute after the IIrst explosion. Mrs. Williams, her clothing on lire, leaped out of one of the windows and fell to the yard bo- low. Her di'iul body was dragged out of reach ot' the flumes, but the flesh v.'as rousted and dropped from the bones. Her husljand was a cripple, nnd probably remained longer than It was safe In an effort to save him. Ho was found burned to a crisp on his bed. Some of tho occupants of the rooms dropped from tho windows and wero bruUoil. Others hung from the windows until tho.firemen came. DEATU-JDEAI.INO- HURRICANE. fiatt 'a'uille' soiifh "o'f'ICiilama, on.the'-new'Washington and- Oregon railroad, kJlllng and injuring others. dead are Thomas G'fahafn' iin'd Hugh" Jameson, of Port- land, The IHec- ney; of .tatally; James'Ycrke, of Carolltofti, skull frncture'd 'arid' baclt" liijured; John Bard, of Seattle, -rljfht arm nnd' right leg broken jvL'ee'- Montgomery, of Seat- tle, injured- about the'.head .and.oody; Arthur Hocliett, of Ivalama, right leg head and left .'Burkey, scalp .wo.unil. .-From the.survlyors'lt.Uvlearned that Thomas Graham and .ilugh Jameson were tw.elve-foot hole .with giant powder, and had put In about'..'100 sticks. Tt is supposed that they had_begun t'ainping the pow- der'with a.crowbnr wlicn the explosion occurred. Jameson's head was blown off ahcVt-frnham was blown almost into a'jelly.' "Scotty" :Heeuey .was thrown up on top of the cut, a distance of 'flf- tt-en -fco't. are4 fatal, though'he wns still alive at lasireport. His chjn was blown' skun frac- tured, nrins and legs'broken and holes blowu throuKli HOLDS STRIKERS Judge Jackson, (of Injunction Fame, Acts in the West Virginia Troubles. DOCUMENT ISSUED IS "SWEEPING" Mine Workers Ordered Off tlio JEnrth, an It for War Is Good. IMPORTS IN ENGLAND OF AMERICAN PRODUCTS ARE ON SIN CREASE. INCLUDES MANUFACTURED GOODS Another Move on United States Diiuisli Foot to .Have Purchase 'the Indies. Parkersburg, W. V., June John J. Jackson, of the United States circuit court, Issued a restraining or-' der last night enjoining lodge No. 558, of tho United Mine 'Workers, iiud two other, lodges, from interfering with the miucrs of the Flat Top coal region, at Thu'ckor, W. Va. The bill of com- plaint, among other things, charges that the defendants were couspiring-to Interfere with the coal mines operated by the Thacker Coal and Coke com- pany, the Lynn- Coal and Coke com- pany, the Logan Consolidated Coal and missiouevs Ca'iCu April' T9UU, 'imd subject to the approval and control of the secretary of war of tlic United- HENDERSON MOW AT lONDON Spcnker Will lie Shown Around nnd a Proinlnnnt Figure. rxmdon, June Hender- son, 'with his wlfo and daughter, ar- rived at Carltou House Thursday for a fortnight In Loadon. He will receive rnnny courtesies from tlic speaker c nd members of the parliament and will bo a prominent figure at the Fourth of July dinner, where he will spenk. This dinner will be unusually large and important. Representatives of every- self-KovonilDg British colony will have seats of honor, and Lord Strathcona will respond for them. Lord Goschen, Sir Ian Hamilton, LevI P. Morton and Frederick H. Gillett will attend the dinner. have boon Indicted by tho tximl jury at Chicago. A. A. Tnllmau, a Chicago man, paid for K drnjr store window ho had In gelttiii; oven with a uutiny hi-tln.'-slot pouuut machine that Couldn't work. U Is statod that the New York Chum of Coininorco dcloKUtlon tlint vlsit- tendon subscribed to tho .Victoria memorial. Excursion Tickets. Tho C'hicatfo Croat Wosltvn will from Tu'lv 1st lo Oth uml 1st to lOtli. nnki- the following very low vatcs: To at. Haul or Minneapolis ami ro- UTo" Duhitli and return. SIS.OO. To Denver, Colorado and Pueblo and rut urn. To Salt Lake City und Oedeu and re- TlH'SO tickets are to return until Cyclone Strlkon In anil TTIpei Out Ono l-'nmlly. Nnpor, Neb.. Juno of tho most destructive tornados to human life that over occurred In Nebraska crossed, down the Keyn Palm river Thursday evening at 0 o'clock. Ono family of seven are all killed, and out of another family of six two are killed and the balance, except the father, are fatally Injured. The family extin- guished was composed of the follow- ing: .laeol) Greening, father, aged -10; Mrs. mother, still liv- ing, lint not expected to .survive; Grace For further Information cull on V. ti. ODD. City Ticket Olllce. Sar. Main street. to y-lU. RODU. City SPECIAL BOUND TRIP KATES To St. Piiul. Minneapolis and Diiluth. Milwaukee' will sell round trip llckctis July 1st to 3th Inclusive and S.-Dt. 1st to 10th Inclusive- to St. Paul utid Minneapolis for SS.OO. to Duluth 00 good to' return until Oct. Slat, Juno 13th to 30th Inclusive and July 10th to AUK. Slst Inclusive, rates to same points will be one faro plus for the round trip, good to return un- AHk'Wundorllch of the "Milwaukee" Cor full particulars. 6-1-1- to 9-10. -O- LESS THAN RATE TO CALI- Chlcago FORK I A. North-Western R'y. Tickets sold July Cth to 13th; return limit AuKUUt Slst. Special truin party, personally conducted, will leave Ch- cuito P. m.. Tuesday, July 9th; lutivc Omaha p. m.. Wcdneaday, July Stops Groi-iilng, Koriotisly Injured, aged 14; Margaret Greening i.aged Maggie Greening (aged John .Greening (aged -I) and Jacob Greening (aged all killed. Out of the family of August Ander- In children, Ida nnd Clara, aged respectively 7 and S, j wore killed, anil the mother and her daughter Bertha, and son Theodore, nguii respectively 10 and 12. wero se- riously Injured. August Anderson, the. fattier, was away from home at tlio time. No other casualties arc as yet reported. Tlio families of. Jacob Berg and wore injured somewhat when their houses wore demolished, but not seriously. All communication with the outside world Is cut off, and It Is Impossible to learn what dumugo. the storm did along the Koya Palm river, west of whore the Greening and Audsrsou families were found. The big wagon bridge across the Keya Palm river was completely de- strovctl. Whore the houses of Green- Ing'and Anderson lino dwellings' and other Is nothing to be seen except kindling. Little Maggie and Jacob Greening were found GOO yards from where the house stood. They wero stripped of nil their clothing, but wero not disfig- ured. The other two children were close'to tho were in full view of their mother ami oldest sister, who wore both fatally Injured, and who could see them but render no as- Washington, June The state de- partment Is receiving gratifying re- ports -from our consuls In England the on ward, march of .American manu- factures. In nearly all the great industrial dls- tiict.s-oE the United Kingdom -the ex- ports to the United States of manu- tatcured goods are dwindling, while the Imports of similar articles from our ports arc Increasing. Consul McFarland at Nottingham re- V arts' the great growth the Ameri- can caned goods trade and of business t-.-atiaaclod by .our dealers. In hardware, stoves, hosiery, typewriters, cash regis- ters and shoes. Consul Stephens at Plymouth speaks of .the growth of our boot and shoe business, and trade In. our ready-made clothing; Vice Consul Renton at Brad- ford tolls of the .'boom In furniture business and Consul Doylo at Liverpool and Consul Smytho at Hull report the progress' of our meat 'and fruit, trade. Washington, June The United Plates minister to .Laurlts S.'.Wenson, .has been granted leave of absence to visit this country and is now supposed route to Wash- ington. :-When arrive it is said conclusive' steps.  run from the house, informed Mrs. Daniels' sister that she had fainted and was In the house. Ho was arrest- ed. June -Torn, .who was minister, of -communication in tho last stabbed yes- terday at 'a meeting of the city assem- bly, and died shortly'afterward. His assassin is. a and gttj-g acted for the gooo. FILIPINO FOURTH OF JULY Will ainrk the to tho IdanUen of Civil Government. Washington, June lioot yesisvday Issued the order of the president establishing civil govern- ment lu the Philippines. The order says that "or. and'after the fourth day of July, .1001'. ;untU it shall be .other- wise ordered, the president.of the Phil- ippine commission will exercise the ex- ecutive authority In all civil affairs In the government of the Philippine Isl- ands heretofore .exercised in such af- fairs by governor of the Philippines: and to that end 'the Hon. William H. Taft, president said commission. Is'hereby appointed civil governor of the.Philippine Islonda. "Such executive authority will be ex-. ei-ci'sed; under, and In conformity to, tuV'liistmetlors to the PJUlliPPJee cojn- llctulfiuarters to Move. Denver, Colo., uJne 22.--Georee Es- tes, president of the. Brotherhood of Railway that the headquarters of tlie brotherhood will be removed from San Francisco to Denver In the near future. This or- admits all railway employes without reference to their particular Jlno of labor. i _ What Hrewlns Culminated. Guntervllle. Ala., June that has 'been 'brewing between the ne- groes and' whites for some time cul- minated In the death of Clebe 'Mont- gomery, colored, who was riddled with Winchester bullets said to have been flred by Tump. Vaughan, :a white farmer.-______________ Think. Ilnrt About Chicago, June 22. Edward D. Morse, a horseman, has sued the 'Washington Park club, Its secretary and two judges, for. damages for alleged Injuries received in being ruled off the track June 4. A. Piukcrtou is also made a 'defend- He a Delusion. Chicago, .Tune Edels- member of an' ancient Hus- slan family, has been sent to''the Jef- ferson asylum. He a delusion .that he.is the 'Messiah.- coived at Kochostor. N. -Y., manufac- tured from crude -petroleum produced in Hussla. The collector of customs' at Rochester held that tho reflued ar- ticle was subject, to duly as a produc- tion of and assessed duty cordingly. While the import-atloh caiiie from England It was shown that the. crude olAvas produced iu Kussla. An; appeal was taken from the action of the collector to tho beard of general appraisers' at New York. This beard. on Jan. 28, 1J501, sustained the col- lector. _ 1V1IEX TJ1R TROUBLE KKA.LLY IJEOAX Treasury Doei Not Sec What Ground fin for Ketallnltotl. The secretary then shows where the trouble really began. He No protest or objection, so far as the de- partment knows, was received from any country against this decision, and the matter was not again brought the attention of the government until March of this year. On that date the department, replying to inquiries from the collector of customs at New York as to how he should ascertain the coun- try or origin In the liquidation of du- ties on petroleum or Its products arrlT- ing In this country, held that of products of crude petroleum be accompanied by a United consular certificate" showing the coun- try whore the petroleum was produced, the absence of this certificate the liquidation was to be suspended, and pending further Information .the rate of duties must be estimated at the rate levied by any country on sucl: petroleum. Further than this the department has never taken any action whatever ou the subject of petroleum. and even in these as? it will be observed tlie rules laid down apply equally and without dlsorlmlnu'.ion "to countries of the world. "Upon this statement of facts otlsciais are :tt a great loss to under- stand how Kussia can feol atwlevea at the government's and inaug- urate a system of discriminating du- ties against products of the United States In cons-nquoni-e. It Is hopfed that Secretary Hay will bo able to sent the facts so that Kiissla will re. scind her action and will show that is not seeiriuu' to unjust lo this coun- trv In tariff matters. The cabinet I'p'als that the administration a strong <-ase. and believes that If si.-i is entirely friendly she will be. convinced that her actloiHsiinfrlendly." TOOK CHANGES Captain of 
                            

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