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Dubuque Daily Telegraph Newspaper Archive: March 28, 1901 - Page 1

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   Dubuque Daily Telegraph (Newspaper) - March 28, 1901, Dubuque, Iowa                               WEATHEH. l-'oi- iMibiHiuc! itnd Uelnliy: Fair toiilclit anJ 1'Vltlay, no decided c'h.'iniio in tempo i-u two. Tliu J minimum ternpui-itluro tonlrht will In- slightly- below llto IntT point. A Newspaper That Advertis- ers and the People Appro elate. VOL. LVI. DUBUQUE; IOWA, MARCH 28, 1901. No 223 SHOT APLAYMATE EOY ELEVEN YEAttS oi- AGE SHOOTS A COMPAN- ION' IN THE LEO. DISPOMEHT OVER POOR HEALTH AH Unknown Man Killed by Train iit Olhor I.uto lown Dodtfo l-'arni'.'l'S T'jk-pliono C'O.. I'o- by M. A. Uuf.'.holl by tli" lliu.' Is eoiiiii.n.-1'.'tl i.i.-ai llnu ami rcei.'lvod thu .--rvk'i-. Thv fal'inoi'ti K-le- v.-ii-! iv'.'i'iilly organized by v.-hn hlM lloniu Muti'iii ami ran .wires to fiinii'jrs' holMus. Tho i-'lily ami soon pruiit- lliu: '.uglily established nil 1'iilliity. in tho Wooloy .March The was Kono ho found that It was a two dollar bill Unit had been raised 'to twenty. Tho olllcors lo Cleve- land Monday and brought Iho young man back with them. Tho follow I claims to bo Innocoin of any wrong doing, having KOUen tho bill In good faith rind passing It the sunn! way. Ho knows who gave him tho and says ho will disclose his naino In due tlmo. NEW ARMY HERO General Frederick Funston's Dar- ing Project Has Proved a Complete Success. SCORES ROOSEVELT Kov. Dr. Pnrlcliurat Points Out Toddy'H G-roiit us a Governor. ll j.-i-rnrii-il 'Boy Jjhoots Playmate. v i'nx. Maroh AK-T, t yi'ito1, was lust l.y ;i Johnnie llnl- M.iii'.-M's faro, tin.- HiUlk'I'I lad bo- picked Up a I'llli- Ii-- hail sninethiiiKf. tho Agcr boy for I-..IIM- -II-stall'.'" am! then shot him In tlv: Til-.- v.-dtiml not Wri'i-It on the Milwaukee. March v ,i v. n-iU "ii tlu- MilwauU'.'o ni-ar put l.i-'.t iilyht. 'I'lio frolxlit tho Karloy imssoiiKor J-.M.P -il tin- it-.K-k at tin- west of il'-rallltu: oiK'it ears loaded i-.al. No ono was Injllro'.! and ..n.; ilainaiiod lull Tin- plal- ;it tin- d'-i'ol wan Imdly toi'li vip. 'i.-, tnn'k was rli.-arod dttrlng tho i :ii: .ii.il aro ruiinlni; d, MUHM., March. Dr. ul' 'Xuw York .spolu- on liuiU-liml I'l-oblum" at the ljuai'il or Ijanciui-t h'.-i'e last night. prexent condltloiiH In New 'ork." In; .salil, "are a direct 1'lalt. Only the anU oui' two OH.MOH know what will Ijt.- the outcome f tho next municipal i.-k-ctlon, and only in sure. Platt'H consplrac.v Tt-uc'.-y to Low shows that o.s.siHin u which gnawy Into if wry vitals of the people-." Pai-khur.st. rvi'ci-i-lnyr tu tin; 1'latt- 'il'-ll row. nakl: "Xtrw York In now In a most Inti.-resl- U Max a. governni'. HIKISI-- "II nut a Kdwi-nor. Me dli.l not a iv to Ntund up iiKiiliiMt 1'hitt. lit- to bo a If lie had up Ilki.- a man he could have Ijorn "Vfi-nor thij term, and that olid have i.-riiiMillulvd an Ininn.-nsi' lilucy for Uu- pri'sl'liincy. As It Is h- M lukl up uii tin.- vli.-u preMltl'.-ntlal wlt-.-lC ml pri.-tty i.li-ad, unli-s.s McKlnley lunil'l ok- befoix- I'.nii. which Uuil for- lil. "H. 11. Oil-.-ll propoMi.-M to bo governor. k- lias sor-voil his notice on Plait to i-ftoi.-t. Thai IH the irroatc-Ht thing luia happoni.-d In Xc-w York In a ooil while." I'oli. Bciipntli tho .I'.uii'nl. Mui't'h un- ;i in.iii kllli'd III th': rall- v.'.-.-ils li'-rv yi'-iUM'iIay monilnjr. Ho Ii' bvarU ii wo.'it-liouml i. I'Ut mlssi-d tils UIK! d-ll .itli tti" Tli'- uiifoi'liinal-j v..is il-tupltntcil. lit tin.- pucUols MH wep- fun nil a nuinbor ti> Con OuiitJUill. and this is bclk-Vrd to i-..inc.-. tliosio Ivtti.-rs was "XvlIU- Wilson" umt boro llu: .if i.irlltin, Tills k-lti.-i- In- .1 dio pi'i'son to whom It was ;s.-il tliut -if out of iliuiiUI com-.- to wrltoi-'.i hoini! v. Tin.1 body ban taken lo city liiilt ami tin.- coronor Itiui n uii'l svill oiidvuvor lo itlunUiy. Tixo Zown' Soldior.i. Mi-liK-s. la.. March itajor whi'j luw roturnod to his in Ci'om a tlli-'.-o yours1 lit tin- I'h'.llpplnos, Is Iftnio from nt' an uccUl'-nl In which hu h.i'l ..r." of his foot crushed. The bonoa nut. unllo prop-.-rly ami bo will have to iin opoi-titlon boforo It rp- from -jaltt. Ho Is nil applK'iCnt a jiiaco In tho regular army and ti' ri-colvt1 an appolntmont lit in- ailjutuiil Ki-noral's ilopai tiitont. Ho v..'1-y p'-pu'ar "H olllcor svheit with ilio c.'ompanlos and Hlnvu !i" r-p...i'ls that Cuptutn tckls, ot Ci-os foiitulnoO In tho laluin.lH. wlu-ro ho lus a position oxamlnor oC tltk-u. t'.'-. la tin? civil sorvlco. Captain Hoss. wont from Slu-nundonh. UIIKUK in unruiilxliiK a company of Maca for lighting tho other pooplu of tli..- t'lilllpplnos. SoiToant JOIIOH. ot MulnoK. roaialin.'d In the ui: u s-.-liuol tt-aohor. (julte a nuinbor of ill-- Iowa boys In tho voluntcur aorvlco in tho Mail CnrvierH Hnvo Trouble. Tvl-do. March wouk the .irri-.-rs on tho rural UollVory routo; :i Tania county struck their Jlrst roa ii'.l and roads. Carrier Uer- on llouio 1 of this place, tilt! nol In f-.-.-.m his Friday's trip until tl Saturday and I'ont nuts tor I.-- starto'.l out Saturday mornlitj, ;i lioi-t-.-buck uiul It took III in iniK'ii niu-r than usual to maki' tho trip ii-.' lii-u wool: of the i-iirrlei-M nt nut front THIIIII and at Mmitoui r.ii-i'lor and his uubslltuto. each a half of tin- route, which IH soiiii" Mat tin; Mhupo of a k-ttor M. Tho mtu i liuli ikep. Bin But- of Duolca. IliimlK-liU. Mai-'.-h nuiubor.' of .lucks aro now boltiK bciKK'.-d on tin Moiiu-it rlvor. All the Kumo birds j'-.'-'in lo luivo wintered well and law lioi ks of gocsu, clsk-kotis am uuall aro to bo scon, it KUOIIIH llkt- kill IIIB tho that lays tho i.'oKlon to s..-.; tho froituont bags of ducks tha tl-.i- boys aro In. 'Che Itiv prohibit tho killing of'nil Bauv In tin? aftor they have os (.-aj-'l tin.- (UuiL'ors of the winter and half a. yoar of Mhootlnu and aro pro I'.irliu: for the neat and a. numorou family. Dcivoudont Over Poor Health. Cliitton, March Howe, t y-'iiii'.: man royldliiK with his mothc DeU'lll. this county, c-omnilllei Kui'Mc h'.tt ovonlitK by hansliiK him -.-if lo a rafter In tho barn. Ills found by lily slstor. Howe ha V'.-.-u In poor "health for aomo tlmo an wuj Ccspondont. Will Pny Dnmnptcii. Pavenport. March offer ha made and will probably be uc whoroby the Glucose StiRftr Uc I'.iilnt: compuny will pay damage I" live cnscs of men killed itnd Injure I" tin; explosion ot tho boiler at th O.ivi-nport plant November 'M. 1000. Jus t'lili'inun. D. I'. Cook, Charles Oelbel sioln niul John Peters wore killed uu Victor KofKi.-rt was Injured probabl for life. The suits thus settlud wer for ctich. Chnvlton Mnn la v Clmrlton. March 23.--J. .T. Smylhc ono of our business jnon, Is the vie tlm of a clever forgery. A youn nuin by thf nanio Fry, living non Clovolnntl No. -I. made a few purchns and offered a twenty dollar bill 1 payment. Mr. Smytho gave hln chango Irom and when ma (MANY BAD BLUNDERS 'ho Papal Secretary IN Severely Kobultvd by Members of tho Vutioaji. Homo, Rampolln, UF papa! wocretary of stato. Is bcliiK ovoi-ely crltlclsird by many iidherontK f tln> Vatican for allOK'-d blunders' In IM recent policy toward both Kurope ml Ainoric-a. Uanipullii'M i-i'ltlcH say.that It was the nrdlnaru woll known unfrloiuUlncss to that caused Kltitf Edward not o solid an'oinbiissy to tho pope to no- Ifj" 'ho holy xoo oC his accession to ho throne. The alleged blunde'rlnp? of Cardinal lampolla Is also hold larwoly rvspon- for antl-clorlcal ngltatlon in Iblo ninco. Spain and Portugal, and tho anio critics declare that the now on- ontu botwcon franco aiul Italy, which he papacy labored to pro-vent. Is no to the cardinal's unfortunate .pol- Tho papal secretary of stale has also, t Is. RSHorted, fallen out with the Ar- 'ontlno Republic and offended that American nation by raising the uinlco to Brazil to u rank superior to hat of the nunlco to Argentina. Tho mayor of Buenos Ayros, the chief Ity of Argentina and of South Am- rlca. Is now here. Ho boro lottors In- roducliur lilm to tho pope, but Cardinal tampolla would not allow tho mayor 11 see tho pope because the mayor mil dines at tlie quli'lnal. and had ilucod a wroatli on tho tomb of King lumboi-t. In addition to this, Cardinal Kum- lolla refuses to consent to the bestowal if the rank of cardinal on Archbishop ,'ustollanos of Buonos Ayros, u rank v.hlclt had boon promised to that pre- ato. ENGLISH CASUALTIES Only Two Killed' nnd Seven Wounded During Babiiigtou's London. "March d'lspa'tch from Lord Kitchener to tho war oltlce, dated Pretoria, March 28, says: "Out- cas- ualties In General 13tibington's r.ctlou wore two killed and seven wounded. The lioers loft twenty-two dead and thirty wounded. As their pursuit was rapid, many more Boer casualties are likely. "Tho operations of March 2.'l drove the onojny north frointhelrposltlonsut Knlllrs Kraal. On March 27, the pur- Milt was continued by'mounted men only. The enemy's rear guard was driven In by a. combined movement on both thinks. Their convoy -was then lighted nt Leetiwfonteln. Tho Greys, .s'iw Xoitlaiulers and Bushmen pushed on. The enemy attempted to lake up a position, but the Greys and other troops 'rodo down all opposition ami gave him no chance. The convoy w'as ridden Into an-J the enemy's retirement liocame a rnut. The pursuit was con- tinued until the horses were exhaust- ed." Cape Town, March encounters at widely separated points aro reported dally. l-'lghtlng took place Tuesday at Tarkastad and Hen- nlngfontclu. both In Cape Colony. The casualties were few. A com- mando numbering under Com- mandant l-'ourle, was dispersed at Thaba Xehu. According to reports re- ceived here, tho hills above Do wets- dorp. Just rcoceupicd by General Bruce Hamilton, wore the scene of a tight lasting several hours Tuesday. Twelve fresh cases of bubonic plague wore otlleially reported yester- day. Eight of tlie victims are Ku- ropcans and four 'are colored persons Two colored victims died yesterday The Malays are causing tho authorities much trouble, but tho priests are help- ing the government to enforce sanltar> regulations, although drastic measures may be necessary to Impose precau- tions upon the Irreconcilable. llc-iulf of n Weslnrn Denver. March of dead cattle, sheep nnd horses strev. the plains of western Nebraska am eastern Colorado as n result'of'the blizzard. In hundreds of small ravlnos and dry 'buds of creeks the animals crawled, to 'be covered -with drifting while other countless number! struggled against the-bllxxnrd to read shelter, but perished on the.rldgoa. .In coining passengers over the Burling ton nnd Union Pacific siiy that. In every gully are seen the carcasses of nnlmnls the bodies are-scat tocecl In every direction ILIPINO CAUGHT IN ISABELLA Intire Party Brought Back: to Manila on Board tlxe United States f Sulu should define his rights in detail. ____________ 'ASSENGER WRECKED ENGLAND SPEAKS Protests 'Against China Making a Convention with Any Power. CHINA DECLINES TO SIGN TEEATY lime Limit Set for Fulfillment of Miinchurlim Agreement by Kussiu Expires. Bad Collision Occurs on the Chi- cago and .Northwestern at Little Rapids. Wi's., 'March 'bad col- lision between a passenger and freight train occurred -on the Chicago and Northwestern at Little Rapids, live, miles soutJt of here, yesterday-after- noon, resulting lu the kl'llng of one and the injuring of .seven others. The lead: Hurry Jones, Green Bay, WIs., engineer., of-passenger train. The injured: .Tohn'TJonnelhui.'fireman of freight, serious; M. ex- pi-ess 'messenger, Milwaukee, serious; Tohn Young, Milwaukee, lireman an >assenger, cutJ.hbout lioad, taken to Apploton: Conductor Ralph Izand, left shoulder dislocated' and head severely 'Albert' Sehoettle, brakeman on passenger, knee badly bruised; Dan of Lac, head cut and thumb Rogers, Apple- ton, injuries'.slight; Mrs. Haueh, She- boygan, Injuries slight: The wreck -was caused by'an open switch. The north-bound 'passenger duo crashed into a heavy freight, standing on a side track. The passenger train does not stop at that station and. was .going at nearly full speed when the collision occurred. Both engines were completely wrecked. The passenger engine, fall Ing on its side, crushed out the life of Engineer 3ones; Fireman Donnel- lau of the freight'escaped death by jumping. Both engines were complete- ly wrecked, the'baggage, and smoking cars were thrown sideways off the track, the front end of the baggage car being wrecked. Most of the In- jnrod were taken to St. Vincent's hos- uital at Gr.oon Bny. REVENUE RULINGS Certain Legacies Not Taxed Prior to March 1' Arc Exempt. "Washington, March coiii- inisslonor of 'internal'revenue lias held that a legacy .for literary, charitable or educational uses "on 'Which tax has been paid .'prior, to March 1, 1001. is exempt from taxation. The decision was made Iti the case of a legacy to the Philadelphia for Women. The commissioner also has .accepted tho ruling of tho-'Unltcd -States, circuit court oL' appeals for. the ninth district to the effect that "goods are offered for sale" at the place where, they are for sale, and where u sale maybe effected. They :nre not offered .for sale elsewhere by sending Abroad an agent with samples or by establishing an office for the purpose of, taking orders. EMIGRANT8FOR HAWAII Hundreds of Porto' Ricnns Others Go to -Cuba. Porto March American 'whicl sailed from-Guaiilcu" Tuesday for New has on board '899 emigrants destined for Hawaii. Oil the .numbei 305 are men and the remainder are women and children'. The emigrants 'are physically suporlor-to those of the previous-expedition. The "American, steamer. Porto Rico which sailed yesterday, took -100 per sons, who'are to be employed in the CiVban Iron, mines. Hot Gambling Closed Hot Springs, Ark., March Hot Springs gambling houses were closed late yofeter.'clay afternoon by order qt ;-Mayor. Holding, acting upoi olnclal notlflcation from Governoi -Davis that he "imU'. signed the and gambling bill. result the club rooms were dnrk night for the first time'in many.years.in this city The law covers .'all of gambling, outside of the poolrooms, and thesi places were conducted as. usua throughout the afternoon. Spot-tin, men of'dollars In vested in.iolub-roo'in niucf demoralized 'by ten for cement of; th .law. and take .a-.-.djsaial. view ot -th la Washington, March British government has protested against China's mailing a convention with any power touching territorial, or lluaueial affairs until the .present troubles in that country are concluded. The fact of the British protest was made known here for the lirst tiuie yesterday'by u dispatch from one of the foreign of- llces of Europe. It says that the pro- test was made through Sir Ernest Satow, tho British minister at Pekiu. It does not state when the represen- tations were made, hue from the fact that the dispatch was received in Washington yesterday it Is taken that the protest occurred within the last day or two. Although" ,the Russian agreement Is not specltlcally referred to, it is said to be clear that the British action is directed against the. Russian agreement. Similar to Auiorlcan I'roteil. The language appears to be similar o that used 'by Secretary Hay in the Uuerieun protest. The effect of the British action is to place the United states, Jupiin and Great Britain In oriunl opposition to the signing of a onventiou by China with any power ending the settlement of the Chinese roubles. The course of Great Britain s the. more slgnilicant from the fact hut'that government and Germany live- a .'written alliance relating to Chinese affairs. Accounts lor Treaty Not Being Signed. The concurrence of these protests explain why the Maijcburian greement lias not been signed. There vas no delinlte Information received ere yesterday state depart- xient or at any of the foreign embas- les, as to whether the agreement had ieen signed or rejected. There was omethlng of a. stir in diplomatic quarters over the report, coming from (tidal sources, that the United States vas considering the advisability of ddressing Russia directly on the sub- ect. Heretofore the American objec- lons to the Manchuria u agreement lave been addressed to China. Copies were furnished the Russian authorl- les, though the protest in form has >een to China and not Russia. Several >t the foreign representatives advised heir governments that this step was lontemplated by the United States, jut there is no otllclal information tvii liable as to how far the consider- ation of the move has proceededl China KaUIng Kaw Troops. London, 'March correspondent of The Standard, wiring 'esterday, says: "Officials here assert hat Count Lamsdorff (Russian foreign accepted the plea of the Jhineseminister at St. Petersburg that an Imperial edict prohibits the signing f the Mnnchurian convention and that ae has granted a brief delay. "China s reported to be raising new roops and to be preparing to defend :he Yaug-tse forts, fearing Russian re- prisals. Eight" anti-Christian rioters nave been beheaded a.t Chang Sha. ill the province of Hu-Nan." TBEATY IS NOT SttJNED, THE CHANGE OF LIFE la the most important period in a man's existence. Owing to modern methods of living', not one woman in a thousand approaches this perfectly natural change without experiencing a train of very annoying and some- times painful symptoms. Those dreadful hot Hushes, sending the blood surging to the heurt until it seems ready to burst, and the laint feeling that follows, sometimes with chills, as if the heart were going- to stop'for g-ood, aro symptoms of a dan- gerous, nervous trouble. Those hot llashes are just so many calls from nature for help. The nerves are cry- Mns. JENNIE Ing out for assistance. The cry should be heeded in. tiiiie. Lydia il. Pink- ham's Vegetable Compound wns pre- pared to meet the needs of woman's system at this trying period of her life. It builds up the weakened nervous system, and enables a woman to pass tltat grand change triumphantly. I was a very siek woman, caused by Change of Life. I suffered with hot Hushes, and fainting spells. I was afraid to go on the street, my head and back troubled me so. I was en- tirely cured by Lydia. E. Piukhaui'B Vegetable Compound." Mns. JBNSIB NOBLE, 6010 Keyser St., Germantovrn, WILL GET RED HAT Martinelli, Papal Delegate to United States, Becomes v a Cardinal. POPE SENDS .NOTICE BY OOLAOIGOHI Nomination Korcshadowetl AVeeks Proceed at Oiice to Rome. lUliougb Time Limit Set by Kunila Kxplred. Peking, March Chinese had lot signed tbe Manchurlan agreement Monday night when the time expired. London, March officials of the Japanese embassy coniirm the re- >ort that the imperial decree has been ssued 'by the court of Siauf u, through Liu Kun Yl. the viceroy of Nankin, ordering that the Manchurian con- vention should not 'be signed March M, the date lixed by .Russia. An In- timation of this decree has been tele- graphed to the -various governments concerned. Yokohama, March a meeting of the parliamentary adherents yester- day .the premier, the Marquis Ito. re- ferring to foreign politics, said Japan had attained a position enabling-her to protect her legitimate interests and to take whatever steps the exigencies of the moment required. It was im- possible to deny that Japan feels the Intluenoe of the complications con- nected with her neighbor anil she lives not ignore the clouds on the hoTinon. NKGtOTIATIONS AllE HINDURUU Decftuso Germany Innlsts In Porcine Upon Clilnu. London, March indem- nity negotiations are says the Pekin correspondent of The Morn- ing Post, "because Germany Insists'in forcing, a loan upon Clilnu to meet the foreign "demands. Sir Robert Hart's scheme of internal taxation would occupy titty years. "A conflict is believed to be eminent between the French and the Chinese troops at Hwal-Lu, LI Hung Chans had ordered the Chinese general to withdraw from the province of Chl-Ll and the general replied that he would withdraw after he had swept the foreigners out. Thereupon General BaiUoutl, the French commander, left Peking yesterday with permission to flght if his force should be attacked. This permission is almost equivalent to positive orders. "The French have II f teen hundred men at Hwai-Lu. and the Chinese arii reported to number Victory would give the French- command ot tho main road to the province of Si by :i bettor route than Fo-Plng, which the Germans have secured. The French Intend to construct a railway to Kalgan as the lirst Btep in a -traus- Mougollti line to Lake Ballal.- "A remarkable testimony was borne to the excellence of American municipal government in Peking ycster-. day when many thousands of Chinese assembled in the. American quarter end presented a petition begging tho Americans f o remain-In Pekin. PeKi'ng.srarch bodies of six dul'lng the siege of the legations and buried in Russian legation were re- moved yesterday for shipment to the United States. In addition to the American troops In Pekia. the Mono- F. M. Wise, sent a detachment of marines to be present at the clisinterment. The courtesy of tho Russians deeply moved-all Americans. Two Russian companies participated in alltlie cere- monies. The Russians guarded the disinterred bodies all night and render- ed all the Russian military honors to the. dead. General Chaffeo wrote to M. de tilers an expression of his feelings and of the feelings of the officers and men of the entire command. M. do Giers. referring to this incident, said: "It was only natural. The Russians and Americans fought: side by side during the siege and were virtually brothers." C LAI MSAGAINST S PAIN Petitions for Damages Amounting to Tiled With IT. S. Government. Washington, March S'pafi- Ish waV. claims commission, which former Senator William E. Chandler, of Xew Hampshire, is president, has received from the state department a full list of the claims against Spain, growing out of tho insurrection in Cuba, which were tiled in the depart- ment up to the loth of the present month. These claims arc all those of Ameri- can citizens, for under the treaty of Paris the government of tho United States and Spain undertook to adjust the claims of their own clttons. The grand total of claims is about. and Included in the list are live claims in excess of a million dollars. Mrs.- Ruin, widow of tho dentist who was killed In a Havana prison, Is a claimant for S7C.OOO. The largest single claim is that of John W. Brock, on account of property losses, estimated at Slli pill HIT 'Kilt OK AtlvnitCAtl. St.. Joseph. Mo., March body blow was .delivered to the St. Joseph dealers and the manufacturers of grain yesterday by the new rate put into olTVet by the railroads, advancing theshlpping price two a hundred. The commercial club at once took up the matter and an appeal has' -beiwi taken to the railway coru- 'tulssioiW- for Xow York to Strike. New York. March 15.000 bakers tlii-catenlng to strike In Man- hattan and Brooklyn May 1, o.OOO have already decided to strike. M. Lurie, business iigent of Union No. oC. who was informed Tuesday night of this decision, by representatives of other bakers' unions, declared the strike would .be the largest ever known in the city. Tied Dynainllo tn Iliivlc. Falls, order to dispose of a ho had caught, in a trap, tied a half-pound dynamite cartridge to the bird's leg. with a fuse Attached, and set the hawk at liberty. The hawk and circled to a great height when a lord report was heard. One feather came down. Atlvnnco In Structural Stool. Xew York, March adv-ince in structural steel has been announced amounting to ?'2 per ton on the price of beams r.nd channels and on angles..to take effect at once. The de- mand for .structural material is report- ed'to 'be enormous and the mills arc full of 3-'iitnl FIro In Huntington, W. A.. March hon, Blake Stevenson's wholesale grocery 'burned yesterday morning. Less, Insured for John Wright, fireman, was killed, aud Will Sturgeon, llremau, seriously 4n- jured whllo lighting the tlamea. Union Scale. New York, March Ameri- can Bridge company, the largest em- ployers ;of bridge and' structural iron .workers in the country; have', signed the union schedule for .this district -Rome, March pope' has com- missioned Count Colaclcchi, of the No- ble guard, to convey Mgr. Martinelll, papal delegate to the United States, his nomination as a member of the Sacred College of 'Cardinals. Mgr. Martinelli's appointment to a seat in the Sacred College has been expected for several mouths, and notice of his prospective nomination was mailed to him early In February. It is expected that Mgr. Martinclli will come to Rome as soon as ho receives otlicial notification from Count Colaclcchi, and that a hew papel delegate to tho United States will be selected. Coiiftlittory to Ho Held In A It is ollicially announced that a se- cret consistory Is to be held on April 15 and a public consistory three days later. Tn addition to Archbishop' Martinelll, tho following prelates will lie appointed cardinals: Mgr. Frl- peti. Mgr. Oaltagnls. Mgr. San Mina- tftlli, Mgr. Ccunari. Delia Voice, the archbishop of Benevento, the arch- bishop of Fernrn. the archbishop of Prague, the archbishop of Cracow, tho bishop of Veruna, and tho bishop of Pavia. Hna Hold Prenent Position rlvo Yearn. The official news of the nomination of Archbishop Martinelll to be a car- dinal will occasion no surprise In this country, -where the appointment has long been expected. He has held his- present position nearly live years, having been appointed to succeed Mgr. Satolli on .Tuly 31, to Order. Archbishop Martiuelli belongs to the Augustlnlan order. He entered the cloister on Dec. (5. 1S03. when 10 years old.-was ordained a priest on Jan. 0, 1871. and rose so rapidly in distinction as a scholar that In ISS'J he was elect- ed general of the order, to which ex- sited position he was re-elected in IS'JC. Spent aim Time In Teaching. Up to the time of his election as general of the Augustinian order Mgr. Martinelli had spent most of his time in teaching. He was :t regent of stu- dies at the Irish Ausustinlan Hospice of Sata Maria in Postcrula. For many, years ho was prominent of tho "Gauges of the Augustinian Saints and Blessed an ottice of great trust .and honor. He is a member of the Holy Office nt Rome, which is called upon to render decisions on-the weightiest of questions in Christendom: PAPERS LACK COURAGE So States Alfred Harmsworth in an Interview Before Sailing. New York, March Harmsworth, .the proprietor of thet London Daily Mail and other publi- cations, sailed for'home on the White- Star Steam'sh'ip' Oceanic yesterday. Mr. Hurmsworth is suffering with a fever which he contracted in Florida. When asked whether he had reason ta change his opinion, which he expressed on his arrival here, as to "changes which will be made in newspapers, he said: "No. I believe that the changes will come and that there will not bo a. gradual change. Some one -will step In some time and make the changes. You are slow In many things in this country. 'Here they are fast as far as elevators, motor cars and other things are concerned, but very slow in other ways. In Kugland we are testing and beginning to adopt some Improve- ments which have already been tested and adopted here. Just so we have In use In Knglaiul Improvements which are not used here. The newspapers lu Kugland are too heavy and those here too light. Your afternoon additions are too frequent. In tho anxiety to get out lirst tlicro I-5 often not.enough tlmo to handle the nows. I have seen, many good things here which I shall adopt when I n-Uirr. to England. The papers here lack courage." Heavy German Immigration." Xew York, March North" German Lloyd steamer Grosser' Ker- rnrst. which arrived yesterday Bremen, brought steerage xengers. The largest number of steet age passengers previously carried one ship was brought steamer Barbnrosa of the sanity line, eleven das's ago. These groat shiploads of people show an unusually, heavy German immigration ftir Pnnlonetl by the Pretldent. Washington. March presi- dent has pardoned Wright Lancaster, who was convicted in IS'.H with a number of others of complicity In the murder of John C. Forsytuo. in South- ern Georgia. The pardon Is granted be- cause of the Insufficiency of the evidence upon which he was convicted. J. L. Bosley. convicted of money order funds while ho was postmaster at Paris, Ky., has been pardoned by the president on the ground that no fraudulent intent was shown at the trial._____________' Street Car Blown to PIccM. Xew York, March" com- pressed air cylinder in a car of the Metropolitan Street Hallway com- pany's Twenty-eighth aud ..Twenty- ninth street branch burst with a tre- mendous report yesterday. .The- bot- tom and sides of the car were torn out and windows in many nearby stores'and houses were broken. man -was slightly hurt. Cyllnclcr Explodes In u Oar. New York, March com- pressed-air cylinder-in a: car-of tha -Metropolitan -Street Railway "com- pany's Twenty-eighth and .Twenty- ninth street, branch burst, with 'h-tre-' uioudons report yesterday. The torn and sides of the car were torn out and windows In many near-by and houses were- broken. Oae wai tllghtlx hurt   

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