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Des Moines Gazette: Thursday, March 29, 1900 - Page 1

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   Des Moines Gazette (Newspaper) - March 29, 1900, Des Moines, Iowa                                VOL 4 NO 6 DES MOINES IOWA THURSDAY MARCH 29 1900 WHOLE NO 215 ELECTION OF MR HARTEN DOWEll AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE Despite tho charge made by Mr MacVicar and his adherents that the Citizens movement was a mere combination of disappointed office seekers am disgruntled politicians the actual truth is that It was a spontaneous uprising of all classes of citizens in protest against the methods of Mr MacVIcai and gross abuses in his administration of the mayors office It is true that there was a large class of men in the Republican party opposing his reelection many of whom were doubtless animated by personal dislike of the mayor but for this state of affairs the mayor is himself to blame The mayor has been an arbitrary dictator in his party and has Insisted that all other aspiring men must yield to his leadership and he has gone far txs to interfere in the politics of every ward In the city and to dictate the appointment of committeemen and has frequently caused hlb police force to meddle In affairs In which they should have had no concern It Is on this account that he has estranged nearly every prominent Republican leader In Dos Moincs and Polk county It Is a notorious fact that even prominent Republicans who took the stump for the mayor to meet what they deemed a political exigency were probably In secret sympathy with the movement to defeat his reelection The publication of the lukewarm Hull etter and the absurd speeches on national Issues by the Republican speakers while at the sumo time damning him with faint praise were straws pointing the direction of the wind Withal Mayor MacVicar has shown many strong qualities as a leader of the masses JIc hna an attractive personality and possesses a personal magnetism that has at times an Influence even upon men who distrust him Added to these qualities was a sort of superb affrontcry which his devoted adherents called courage and his opponents called gall and this has caused him to commit many indiscret ons which a more skillful politician would have avoided It would servo no good purposes to review all the charges brought against Kayor MacVlcars administration in the recent campaign but it may be truthfully asserted that there were two criticism which were pertinent and which had a powerful influence In bringing about his defeat First that lie used the power of the public patronage to build up a political machine and In so doing he incurred unnecessary expenses which the people had to pay in furnishing places for his political friends The next important factor and wo believe the principal one contributing to his defeat was In keeping disreputable men on his police force who permitted the notoriously evil conditions of Whitechapel together with public gambling and other v ces to exist and flourish While it is true that it is difficult to entirely suppress the vicious elements in cities the law Is adequate if an honest effort is made to enforce It to restrain it and janish it from the public gaze It was not altogether the church element of t ie city who resented what they deemed the wilful neglect of the mayor lo do his duty In this regard Conservative business men know that here is an economic value in the suppression of disorderly houses and the restraint of disorderly persons Thousands of dollars that flow into tie coffers of gambling housei and houses of prostitution are diverted from the til IB of legitimate business men and from the homes of their unfortunate v ctlms There is also the fact that every disorderly bouse in a greater or less degree requires the intervention of the courts and the taxpayers foot the bills Whllo we believe that the majority of the voters who were influenced by this belief that the mayoi liad not done his whole duly it Is a fact that the conservative men of Deb Moiues thought tuo time had arrived to draw the line between a fairly liberal policy and the wideopen methods of Mr MacVicars administration The election of Mr Hartenbower brings into the public service a man of exemplary character and good common sense who will we believe carry nto his office the same qualities which lave made his business career a success He Is not only an affable gentlenan who will be courteous to all c asses of citizens but a courageous am honest man who will regard public office as a public trust and whose inbition will lie to give the people of lies Moineis an administration which will do justice to nil classes and all interests We believe the people of lies Moincs have chosen wlsoly hi ointiiiR 1 1 Ilartenhowcr mayor and that they will never have cause lo regret lluii art ou Mayor MaeYicnr will curry Into liin retirement tho best wlchos of the people of lies Moincs fur his future prosperity and usefulness and they will give him the assurance that with all tholr past differences of opinion they still hold him In high MACVICAR ON THE RE any candidate on cither OF MILITARISM The St Louis Republic has the hoard most of the time At the ant examination the only birth mourn the loss of about iiiat had been intrusted to BY S It DAVIS fse DM HOWES IBM CRHSTON Kstablkbod Maj IBM Consolidated Jnuunry G through a combination o Ilillnences There is no question bu that In the Republican ranks In add tlon to the opposition from the old citj hall ring who were turned out of office I had pronounced opposition from the county and national organizations Congressman Hulls particular friends took the lead in the open opposition li the republican ranks There wore not less than four government ottieialb actively engaged in the caiupuigt against me Dr Miller a relative ot Captain Hull who was recently appointed to the position of surgeon at Fort Crook acted in the capacity of chairman of the Hartenbower meeting at the Tabernacle last week 15 D Sclby appointed bv Captain Hull to a position in the department of Indian affairs and Mel Stone holding another government position were home and in vigorous opposition to me IX R Way holding a position In tho agricultural department came home early in tho campaign and gave out that he was here to accomplish my defeat In addition there were the postoflice employes practically a unit In opposition to me Several of them notwithstanding the civil service laws worked in the court house and other precincts against me To be more spcctllc there were H C Bachrodt chief clerk of postoJHcc department Postmasters Atkins of University Place and Farr of Sevastopol as well ns all the other substation Influences In active open opposition to me Of course there were other influences My vigorous policy for the control and regulation of franchise corporations created powerful opposing influences and a liberal campaign fund which was put to effective use Evidences of colonization in the downtown districts in support of the favorite candidates of the street railway particularly In the Fourth and Fifth wards were abundant and of course contributed to my defeat In the court house I had pronounced opposition from the olflccs of the treasurer cierk and sheriff The deal which was evidently made between some of the candidates upon the repubIcan ticket whereby in consideration that no opposition be placed in the field against them they would betray the icad of their ticket has home fruit This betrayal Is particularly noticeible In the Sixth ward the home of Candidates Loveridgc and Brereton This ward one of the strongest rupuliIcan wards in the city rolled a tremendous majority against me I cannot but hope and believe that he vicious attacks made upon my personal character by the opposition have lot contributed to my defeat otherwise I should feel the defeat keenly I am particularly pleased that the results up to this hour Indicate that with the exception or mayor the entire republican ticket is elected It is a atisfaction to know that those friends vho have proven their loyalty by reusing to deal with the opposition am lot to be punished for it I appreciate especially the risks John lticas and rank Blagburn assumed when they refused to purchase a free field ut my expense I regret that the employes of the city vho have stood with me for four years and who have done faithful work at meager compensation should at thin ime through political adversity be urncd out to seek other employment appeal to them to not follow In the ootsteps of their predecessors and veary the public with bickering and strife against the new administration lather let them return to their former vocations where I am satisfied they can earn greater compensation in a more independent manner than tney an In politics Personally I am salsfled to return to the ranks of private Ife for a time and take up a business iiore profitable than politics has proven to me And I ask my friends to join with me in support every endeavor of thrtew administration to further the best nterests of DCS Monies I have th3 conscientious satisfaction of bolievfnir hat my four years in office has been of some advantage to the city of Dis loincs It has not been without faults grant but on the whole I am well allsfled and I believe that the results will be better appreciated when compared with former administrations and jossibly with future administrations JOHN MAC without opposition polling a tola of 9037 the largest number ol votes credited to any candidate 01 either ticket George M Kins rcclerfd city of militarism and impuriaiisu under the rule of McKiuley It When Mr Stout became a candidate for the position of mine vcry few months the public kariiB of similar instances of misuse of trust lunds The losses in OFFICIAL PAPgR OP POLK in tiiu approaching cam paigu to keep clearly before the peo pit the significance of thu Hepubli can endeavor to blind tltu American public as far as possible to the enor inously increased cost of the army This tricky policy of the imperia isls Is exposed in the Republican framing ot an appropriation bill man millions of dollars below the audio estimates of tho amount necessary to maintain the army for t iu IKXL fiscal year That there will be a deficiency of large proportions is known to the house committee on military affairs which had the bill In charge and tliG attempt to thus fool the people was condemned by the Democratic members of Liic committee but it was forced through by the Republicans The imperialists hope in this way to gradually tra n the people into acceptance of t iu army tax burden inseparable from a national policy of imperialism and militarism As yet howecr It Ig not possib c to an imperialist administration to holu back from the people those details of government which they have every right to know The army bin get for last year reached a total of exceeding the appropriation by 138000000 The appropriation for this year is 11200000u which is 16000000 less than the estimates and it is believed that the final cost will reach a total of Contrasted with the antcMcKiuley figures ranging from 523000000 lo for the annual cost of tho army these figures are somewhat startling A iiig standing army Is a confussed menace to a republic Us cost lh i tremendous tax upon the people African voiurs are not so helpless is the people of Europe crushed aiirost to earth by the burden o militarism It will be the fault of these voters if they consent to assume such l burden The European policy of militarism and taxation for militarism has no excuse for existence la this passed tho last examination He took the position tbat the examination twelve years ago was sufficient Governor Jackson established a precedent of ignoring all but the last exaiuiiiat on before the time for appointing mine inspectors but it is announced that Governor Shaw lias determined tu ignore it in the case of of the class that can least aitord to bear them Immigrants that cannot speak liuslish are the easiest victims of thcse banks In tho couniries from which these Immigrants come there are postal savings depositories whero small savings can be placed with absolute assurance that the money wiil be returned when needed In the United States there is no sucli encouragement to habits of thrilt The immigrant If ho would save his money must make use of such banks as ho Duds and too often in his ignoranco he deposits his money in some bank which is not at all certain to pay it back VUHLIIHED BSTiltY THOHiiUAY AT Ul TVUHTB iT MdlMJB Frank Blagburn republican was reelected market master over Walter T Kestevan democrat by a majority of 451 F A French unopposed reelection to the olllce of city assessor received 8407 votes W Kcffer for park iotii miss loner received 8738 votes For atdcrmenatlarge 11 0 Hanger and John Lovcrtdge unopposed received 8501 and 8391 votss each In the First ward J E Fagen defeated B H Barnes In the Second J P Patrick Republican defeated Milton Hrackctt Democrat In the Third Dr Dorr independent Is elected over Frank Kiest Republican and H M Belvcl Democrat W S Hall Democrat defeated John Monarch Republican in the Fourth ward In the Fifth ward Frank Bennett democrat was elected over Eric Rostberg In the Sixth ward William Brereton Rcpub lean was elected without opposition n the Seventh John B Gibson Kepnbican defeated Thomas Sellers Democrat At 11 oclock Monday nlsht when It was a certainty Mr Haitenhower was elected Mayor MacVicar went to the leadciuarters of the citizens commiLtrit n the Equitable building to tender his congratulations to his successful opponent At this time In Rplte of the IrlzzliiiK rafu and sleet that was fating remnants of crowds of enthusiastic supporters lingered about he Equitable and were shouting with vim and vigor for Jem as thcv familiarly called him The outcome ippearcd to make no impression on Mr MacViears good nature and when isked as to the results he assured his lucstioners they were all right foi rtr Hartenbower Mr Harteubowcr was not at tho icadquarters In response to the swellng demand of a good many lie had made a brief address to the crowd as soon as it was apparent he was elected then went away from the icadquarteis The doors were guarded o prevent the crowd from making too much of an Impetus to the beadquarters but the mayor was admitted with one or two accompanying friends le shook bands with the two guards vearlng citizens bodges at the outer ioor and then climbed several flights of stairway to the citizens headquarters Mr Hartenbower It was ound had gone as those below said hey thought he had but were not eerain In the headquarters grouped about discussing the oitoome were L J Bliitec C C lrtoiim L W imith exDeputy Sheriff Joe Dyer N Vertrees Sam Haworth Jim Stout and there Mayor MacVicar shook bands with Mr Blalse inquired for Mr la rten bower and being assured he lad gone home said Ue had called to ongratulate him He said he would xpresa his congratulations to the committee in behalf of Mr ITartenhowcr nd hoped they would bo conveyed to lim He was assured this would be lone by Mr Blaise and without urther formalities the visit was ended he mayor then left for his home in North DCS Molne3 Mr Hnrtenbower talked briefly with reporter concerning his victory In he course of his rounds with the paade he made no address but simply acknowledged the congratulations of he enthusiasts who thronged along he carriage He said I am not much given to taklng lo he newspapers and have little to say He was asked what plans he had laid ut for the government of the city and on what lues he intended to rui mnidpal affairs Well he replied I have not laid own any particular plans for tin uture All I can say is Im for dcency and for honest government I ropose to dress this city up a little t hink it needs it and I intend to do it The following is a recapitulation of he vote as canvassed by the citv clerk Mac HartenVicar bower First ward 93G 900 Second ward 9S2 S74 Third ward 1314 115S fourth ward 1117 ward S71 Sixth ward Sol 1392 Seventh ward 387 5SO Total G40S 7OS9 Hartenowers majority GSI FOR SOLICITOR Mcrshon McIIenry First ward 10S4 GSu Second ward 1044 751 Third ward 1448 Fourth ward 1008 1037 Fifth ward S10 iOtl Sixth ward tiiiG 1117 Seventh ward 101 500 To a 0754 G070 Mershons inajnritv fiSI FOR MAUKBTM ASTER Ulaglturn KLstovaii irst ward 11C1 649 Second ward 100 729 Ililrd ward 1127 tS5 mirth ward 1027 PSS viilh ward film 1085 mxth ward RSO 1221 Seventh ward 375 511 Tola 6560 6101 UlaqbuniB nnjorilv 4GZ Judw Silvara and Ccorge Kins for police and city iiKincer had no opposition and re ami M101 respectvilv Harry Oross for trensiirer hail no opimsiition Tho vole cast fur him was SS3o FOR AUDITOR litieas Prink Plrsl want 1124 C7 ward itll 77 Itilnl ward 147fl R70 iniivth wanl 1ISO Stlf Fifth ward Sfirt Sfil wrnl 10 Sinfilth ward M1 Total 707G G6S4 Lucas majority BUBIHBHB IOWA Txi CPROKE feiwrd tt FortitRUw ai Den MoloDa lotn aa Jlmw Mall Hoo POR YEAR IN ONLY DEMOCRATIC PAPER AT STATE bill lias been Introduced in tbe eglslature which has for Its object t ie prevention ot placing adulterated foods on the market It was prepared by the Horticultural society and is patterned after Hie pitrn food bill t lat is now before congress and will passed in a few days A careful reading of this measure will convince anyone that it Is one of much merit and that it should pass at this session of the legislature It provides that the present state dairy commissioner shall become state dairy and food commissioner and gives him power to inspect anything used for food which lie deems likely to be adulterated It provides that the article in question shall bo divided into three parts or so much of it as is necessary for examination one to be given to the person dealing in the article one to the county attorney in the county where he resides and the other to he kept by the commissioner who shall have the same examined by the state board of health If the dealer should have hia portion tcslci liy a competent chemist and it is not found to correspond with the report of tho state board of health the part kept by the county attorney may be examined by a chemist to bo named tho commissioner and his report shall decide whether the food is adulterated or not The bill will work no injustice to any dealer who is handling gcnuino goods and it is time that something was done to prevent any other kind being placed upon the market The class of manufactured frauds that is placed upon the market under names that deceive the mying public is something appalling t has been openly sworn to by many reliable manufacturers that but very few of the articles of food we buy are exactly what they claimed to be and that In many casas they are only obnoxious but positively injurious to the health ot the public This bill should receive the unanimous suplort of the people of this state aside rom te few who are benefited by being financially interested In frauds Copies of tho bill can bo obtained by addressing the secretary of the Horticultural society at the FRIENDS of lids paper urn rciiucslfd to wind os the tottiiiw ami addresses ut poreuug uf tnoir who aro or sllvor adtocales and whom Uiey know would iatentsWHl lii rondiug it reKiilut DEMOCRATIC COUNTY CONVENTION The Democrats of Polk county will IBOCt In delegate convention at the court bouse in Dos Moincs Iowa at oclock a m on Saturday April 14 1900 for the purpose of selecting delegates to the Democrat State Convention which meets in Dea Moincs Iowa on the 31 day of May 1900 It Is recommended that the caucuses of the different precincts to select delegates to county convention be held on Wednesday evening April 11 at such place as the several precinct committeemen shall designate The basis ot representation to the county convention will be one vote for each precinct in the county and one vote lor every twentyfive votes or fraction thereof tit fifteen or over cast for the Hon Claude Porter for secretary of state at the general election of 1898 Under this ratio the several precincts will be entitled to representation as follows DeleTownship gates Allen a Beaver 4 Bloomfield 4 First precinct 2 Second precinct 5 Clay 3 Crocker 4 Delaware 2 Douglas 3 Elkhart 3 franklin First precinct 2 Second precinct 3 Four Mile 5 Jefferson 3 Lincoln 2 Madison C Baylor I First precinct G Second precinct 3 Washington 3 First precinct 2 Second precluct 3 a Second precinct 4 Third precinct 6 Fourth precinct 3 Second ward First precinct 4 Second precinct 4 Third precinct 5 Third ward First precinct 4 Second precinct u Third precinct 4 Fourth precinct 3 Fifth precinct 2 Fourth ward First precinct 5 Second product C Third G Fourth precinct 3 LeeFirst ward First precinct I Second precinct S Third precinct 4 Fourth precinct 11 Sixth First precinct 3 Second precinct G Third precinct 4 Fourth precinct G Fifth precinct 3 Seventh ward Finjt precinct 1 Second precinct 1 Third precinct 5 Fourth precinct 2 Total 1S9 All electors of Polk county who believe in the principles ot the Democratic Party and who are opposed to the methods and policy of the Repubican administration in natioua and state government are invited to participate in the caucuses to select delegates to the county convention 13 B EVANS Chairman J C HANSEN la March 11 Farmers Tribune After reading the admirable articles by F W Stlwill I return to he contemplation of your tax bill I urn not Ju favor of tho bill and by your leave I will state my objections If enacted this bill would thwart tho very ends you wished to promote Borrowing is by no means so bad a thing that it Is wise to tax borrowers and that In the end borrowers would have to pay this tax there can he no doubt On outstandns and miniatured obligations the lender would have to pay the tax but on new transactions whether original loans or renewals it would bo paid by the borrower in higher interest The real value has been taxed when the property which gives value lo the bond mortgage or other evidence of credit was taxed and it is not any mans duly to pay any more I agree with yon that our tax laws need revising We differ only as to what changes should bu made Simple honesty between the citizen and the government would demand that as God Is no respecter of persons neither should the government be Government should therefore recosnizo that what God has made belongs as much to the humblest chlld as to tho mightiest potentate Natural resources should be held by private Interests only as their full annual value s pa4 Into the public treasury for the benefit of those excluded Two terms here need defining Natural rsoiirces and those excluded By the former is meant the earth or any portion of It whether consisting of land or water By the latter Is meant all mankind except the occupant of the portion of Gods earth occupied or held as private property Just na the taxing of evidences of credit makes it harder to get credit a note being notwealth hut evidence that theother follow has the so natural resources are harder to get IT something else is taxed and they allowed to wholly or partly escape Any man can afford to pay yearly all It Is worth for the privilege of excliuUns his fellow men from such natural resources as he wishes to use but no man can afford to pay all it Is worth for exdudrng others and still not use Thus unused natural resources would lie thrown on the market at once This would work no Injustice to any man but would solve the labor problem the tax problem and many others II D Easily Elkhart Iowa There seems to be a misunderstanding anioLis men generally ns to tho present law governing the taxing of notes and mortgages Nearly everyone seems to understand that the law in operation does not provide for tha nxation of this class of property at all This Is not true The present law makes it obligatory upon every owner of a note or mortgage to produce it to be listed for taxation and the man who fails to do so perjures himself Section 2 of the Tribune tax bill simply provides a weapon which will enable the assessor to compel holders of this class of property to produce it Section 1 of the bill repeals the section of the law which provkles that holders of notes and mortgages as well as money shall have the privilege of deducting their debts before turning in their property to the assessor To illustrate If a mnn hold five thousand dollars worih of notes anil mortgages and owed four thousand he would have the privilege of deducting the four thousand and would have only one thousand to turn In for taxation If he was a holder of real estate and olher personal property to the amount of five thousand dollars and owed debts to the amount of four thousand the present law would not permit him to deduct one cent Init would compel him to pav tax on the full five thousand This is so unjust that none cart fall to see it The object of section 2 Is to forcft tlie dishonest holder of notes arid mortgages to comply with the law which now exists If what Mr Easily says should happen the borrower would be no worse au than he is at present for be would not be compelled to do more than pay the lax in the way of interest while ie pays it now in increased taxation hit wo can convince him that he la wroni The money that is loaned on real estate in this state comes from everv state east ot the Mississippi river as well as from tho wealthy men of this state This money is not loaned by one man or firm but by thousands of money loaners All arc In fomptlition to loan their money aul OIKS vho Unm It the clieaperit will pet Urn takers Tbe courts have decided Ihtit notes held outsldo of Ibis siate are taxable where they are held and therefore they would nut be tjixiitto here Now let our money UCIIHTS attempt lo raise tho rate of interest to borrowers and what would happen Tlie oiilfltrto money lenders would pliicp all tho loans and Iowa mmiev would go begging This Is u cold fact that Mr Kastlv must yce the truth of No Mr Kasllv the of this law will not raise Ibe niton of intend H will not workan to tbe borrower It will iiit be to lender for lie should pay tax na well aa other people p g RAILROAD JUDGE The appointment of Congressman Smith McIkiVson the well known railroad attorney for United States district Judge lo succeed the late Judgf Woolson is another proof that under the McKinlcy administration none but corporation lawyers ueei ipply for places at tho federal bench Ibo Creslon American comments on the appointment as follows The appointment of the Hon Smith MePherson instead of Judge Titwner for the position of federal udge will be a great disappointment to ttie people of the Eighth district Mr McPherson has for many years jcen the attorney of the C B Q md has handled their important cases n the federal courts lie is sin able avvycr anil socially a genial gentle nan hut he has no claims whatever on thu party for such a position Ho 5 now serving bis first term in congress which this appointment will compel him to resign His long connection with the railroad interests and his decided corporation leanings should have pre ciuded his appointment It has long been known among the leading politicians of Iowa that ID one except he had strong corpur11 ion sympathies could secure any mporlunt positions under the Repub lean regime and knowing ones have said ail the time that Townor had no show because he was not closely enough connected with corporation nterests It was also predicted that the sceciion would be delayed until afte everything had been arranged for Mr lepbunfs renoinination so that Judg Towner could not be candidate agams lim This has been accomplished The Republican congressional con vention has been called to meet in i ew davs and MV Hepburn has tha slate all fixed Towner has been tie ip long enough so his friends canno now present him as a candtdat against Hepburn The railroads hav i friend on the bench for life an he corporate grin on the people lia another strongest opposition which we lave met in the discussion of the Tribune tax bill baa been from the single taxers who contend that the passage of this bill will take us farther away from the single tax idea we are now and Unit instoad ot Increasing the tax on personal property wo should take on all there is now and place It all on the land The writer lias tried to look at this question of single tax in an unprejudiced manner and learn its merits but have never ben able to see wherein the people would be benefited thoreby If we understand the proposition of the single tax advocates correctly it s as follows One branch proposes that the state or the nation buy up or tike possession by condemning it of all the land in the country and then lease it out to those who wish to occupy it at a certain rental which would be high enough to pay all the running expenses of government both oral state and national The other branch does not propose to buy the land but to repeal all tax laws now u existence and place the tax upon real estate and place the tax high enough to prevent anyone from owniig land which did not bring him sufficient income to pay tho tax and if be failed to pay ihe land would be sold or taken possession of by the government Either plan would amount to the same thing in the end for the land would be confiscated if the tax was not paid In the first place the tax would be so burdensome that it would be impossible for the farmers of this countrv to pay It and compete with other countries in the products they would raise Ono of the nmin nrfitimcnts advanced by the single tax advocate Is that that land should not belong to any Individual but to the people In common and that every man should have the right to what land ho needed at nil times Single tax would not bring about this condition for if a man could not buy and own a piece of properly he could lease it for as loin as lie desired o do so If he couhl not there would no inducements for him to Imlld and make other improvements If ho had the right to build and improve tho laud he must also have the risM to transfer that blinding and the land that it stood upon Therefore the title as lease holder which ho held would become as valuable to him us a title of ownership would be If be had possession of a particularly valuable or desirable piece of ground and had buildings upon it bf might have to pav a high rental for It but when He went to pell tbe Imildiiiss to some one else he location which lie could transfer willi the building might hrtng lim thousand of rtollnrs ns n rrrosWeration for bis lease to t e inireluishig party When all those tilings are considered we can soeno place where we won lil benefited by tbe single tax systrin It is nil right to talk of taxiig natural resources lint if it were not for lie Industry of man the natnral resources of beworld would not fcnl very many people F W WITH THE PHILIPPINES The war department explodes the heory about the trade following the flag in regard to the Philippines in a tatement just published which shows ho commerce with those island for tinquarter ending September 30th It is shown that of the total export of raw sugar amounting to onlv Sn002 went to the United States vhiie Japan and Great Hriain took luarly all of the reiuainmler Also us o leaf tobacco the expurls of which verc valued at the exports to he United States were trifling in imount Spain takiim the lions share inmelv 2MS18 and Midland S3SHI7 The United States also took of Manila cigars out of a total export of imi Hnw tho ther manufactures of tobacco came to he United States In fart rlgars ami iiiarctles to the amount of were mported from the United States Even n Manila hemp the Tinted States was second to Great Britain taking UCilfi worlh while Great llritain toitk Jl 147421 The totnl valw of hemp exports was SiTTOitOT and the annnml vas 10943 tons The imports of merchandise into the xlauds were valued it 5l437017 uiu the exports Silvir cmn t the value of was impmted STOUT AITOIXTKO MINE IXSlKCTOH It was announced Mondav cveiiini hilt 1 E Stout had been assured by Governor Shaw1 that he would bo appointed state mine inswvtor lo KIIC cecd Inspector Ilimplxlt Mr Stout was mine inspector twelve years aii He resigned to manage i Iane ciul mine In llio DIK Molncs iHMrlvt Before his appointment tho last time as mine inspector tho law went luio effect which requires candidates for he postlion to pass an examination Mr Stout passed the examination Since that time hn has been a member ot the ARMY POST Colonel Godfrey and D B Lyons drove down Into Warren county Tuesday to inspect one of the proposed sites for the DCS Moincs army post The site in question is the GOOacre farm of Robert Pilmor six and onehalf miles south of the city on North river Onethird of the farm is us level as a floor and the remainder is of a rolling character the whole tract being a model tract for an army post The farm Is three miles from the Keokult Western railroad BO that n spur could easily be built to the post The committee wish if possible to secure a Site near the city so that it will be just a nice drive to the post Thero lire a number of places the committee would like to secure and an effort will bo made to do something In the matter very soon On the Northwestern road just north of the city there is a flue site tncre Is another on the Hock Island just east of the city one on the Rock Island near Valley Junction and several just sout i of the city on the Great Western The coming of the post to his diy would bring a great deal of business to the railroads and the committee IK in hopes that one of thorn will otfor a suitable site Dos Moines has sure y done enough for the railroads am when the fact is considered that it would mean thousands o dollars for the road that seciiml thesite it soems strange hat they nrr not more nnxloi s lo do something The Illnicr tract inspected yosUrday ran be obtainoi for per aero and Colonel Godfrey pays that tho price is very reasonable If the railroads will not donate a Kite nil effort will be made to buy lie Illluer site by subscription For on new prilr e fnrms plant Scotch Pine Red Cedar or White CITY ELECTION Mayor J J HARTENBOWER Solicitor J EDWARD MERSHON reasurer HARRY F GROSS Auditor JOHN U LUCAS Police Judge L I SILVARA City Engineer GEORGE M KING Market Master FHANK 0 lUjAUlUTRN Assessor K A FRENCH ark Commissioner W B KEFFlOlt O HANGER JOHN LOYEIUDGE For Ward Councilmcn Hrst J 13 FAG EN Second J P PATIUCK DR E E DORR fourth W S HAL1 F J BENNETT SIXTH WILLIAM UREKISTON Seventh J 11 GIHSUN J J IlartenhmvLr candidate for uayor ou the citizens ticket was lected Mondav over Mayor lohn MacVicar the Republican nominee by n imjorllv of GSI Harteiibowor carried Lee township by HS1 votes MacVicar met him at lie river with a mamUv rf in DCS Mimics HarUiihower carried every precinct on the ICast Side with the single of the First precinct of tho Seventh ward and on the West Side tin Fourth nf First the Third of the Sicnml the Fifth of the Third and the First and Fourth of the Hi while the vote in the First of the First was a tie 1 lid ward Morshon republican was reHertd city ttollrttnr over Walter MiHenry democrat lv a majority 11 1 Ilarrv F Gross for treasurer had no opposlt ion and received n tola of S7CH votes John H Lucas far city auditor Aceated CJcnrge N Frink democrat by a majority of 1122 the largest rhiriign TCfvonl which is niakn g a gnllanl fight to linve a law lassed providing for postal savings tanks says nimlitl Frnnk a banker doing biulnosB nt 300 South Clark street las fled and his fellowcountrymen   

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Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

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Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication