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Des Moines Daily Leader: Friday, March 7, 1902 - Page 1

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   Des Moines Daily Leader (Newspaper) - March 7, 1902, Des Moines, Iowa                                SHI PES MOINES DAILY LEADER YEAR, XQ. 57. EE FOR PRINCE HENRY iRD MAKES HIM AN HONOR- BY DOCTOR OF LAWS. sents to the German Museum graphs of the tails Which tbe eror Is 1" Send The Kecep- :s at Boston and Cambridge. March Henry or tt.is the guest of Boston today v-Jcome to the city was a iror- Governor Wiuthrop Murry 1 Mayor Collitie, acting i'oi _- and the city, extended the of- uirtesies to him and when the .-eremonioufily returned their went to Cambridge to deliver LS of his brother, the kaiser, lermaa museum and to receive arvard the honorary degree of if laws. Henry's first act at the Har- lion station, shortly after he re- he degree, was to propose and cheers for President Roose- !0 is a Harvard alumnus. The a cablegram from the congratulating him on his honor. In the prince was given a din- the city of Boston, and eat :U with more than 200 of the rep- ive citizens of the common- He will resume his journey the morning and tomorrow he- t Albany and the United States academy at Point, en New York, which city he will iat night. Bright sunlight fa- te day and the streets and ave- thronged. before the special train was due began to assemble in the neigrh- of the great South street sta- I extended along the streets as- for the passage of the proces- "he mayor with his party of icials arrived at the station after 9 o'clock. The First bat- C cavalry, one of the best Mas- tts volunteer troops, had drawn ie station ready for escort duty, i open carriages were in waiting: thf prince and his party to Somerset, their first stopping i this city. Kuceptltm In Itoston. the carriages a battalion of the uisetts naval brigade was up, ready to assume duty as ii honor as the prince and his escort approached. With the as a band. The train was made vo engines and seven cars. Collins and President Doyle oard of aldermen and President f the common council were re- >y (Rear Admiral Evans as soon rain stopped. The officials were 1 into the car and introduced to rlenry. ;1 Bingham, military aide to it Roosevelt, led the way into station, where the cavalry was at attention. Then followed dmiral Evans, Prince Henry, it Secretary State Hill and Collins. Other members of the rought up the rear. e Hotel Somerset a few mo- were given the prince and his 0 rest. Crane and President C. W. f Harvard university called on nee. 'Governor Crane remained 1'siv miutes. Shortly after his ire the prince started for the ouse, where he was received by ,-ernor, the lieutenant governor e heads of the military and srces and the state department, Crane conducted Prince to the hall of the house. The were received with applause, ince merely >potveH in acknowl- t. Without further formality ty left the state house, proceed- the public library, where the was to pay his respects to Collins. Here he received the rs of the city government also ;t thirty-five veterans of Ger- ars. Mayor Collins introduced erans. One of them made a address and the prince replied man. He e-pressed delight at the veterans and shook hands ich of them. ving the reception the prince :orted by Mayor Collins through to the Hotel Prince Henry received Judge C. Lowell and Henry L. Hig- representing the corporation ol d university, and at 1 o'clock with them for Cambridge. The >p was at the Cambridge city lere Mayor McNamee presented e tings of the city of Cambridge laborately engrossed form. Ona id school children of the city jou the arrival of the prince. Kcceived at Harvard. after o'clock the party reached mncls. Th-ey were received by nt Eliot and the members of iversity corporation were pre- The visitors were conducted to V theater, where the honorary of doctor oC laws was conferred 'rinca Henry by President Eliot, jsident'said: occasion is unique. Twice in the of the university has especial aca- ipsalous been held to do honor to udeiit of the United States, making ess through the country; but never has this university been called to- to do honor to a prince. Weighty must have determined such un- nied action on the part of this of scholars. These are tho rca- turlcnts of history know the Teuton in the dim past, of many insti- smrl public customs which have aiismiUecl through England to this inland. Puritan origin of the university us hold in grateful remembrance testant. Maianothon ir kindred the German who upheld that precious cause 1 long yea.rs of confused alarms icl warfare. The Puritan govern- C Massachusetts had followed anx- ho vicissitudes of the thirty years' d wsis in the habit of ordering pub- akSKiviruf to Gort fur "good news crmany." itching the social and ethnological ie.ua of our own times we have int tho largest contribution which perm people made in the nineteenth to the population of the United came from Grrmanv, and that the i (junta was not only the most nu- the. best therefore, in exercise, if authority, fuo by the president and follows c board of overseers, and in the  OM-CHUSI! Iu the l.iw. I'.ut ssuj'ivnii1 i-inirt divisions j I day lio tiii! not a I'll! In-' ti> thv' l.iii'not-s of till- Ho Miia it Olivia u> I'o :tml tho tlir-'f stn.it i-ilii- pl.uod uiuu 1 a lxid> 1-1 oliiot in us.Uu um luvnr ;ul i-i ihv lai'Ki- atmnint of imllmK ihvit N wdui.m'd iu .U s. ,'t tho to H'-l jipiiii'i'iia- :.n- ihi> iius'.ltiuu'us. tl.t-t iMIIIl.Ml IIUMiltUt l.i luia'.lim eiliiv-atlonal liiMitutiiui> nuii-iuiUt a iul pliu-iitity WUM ilio Iv.iui of Control li.-iotv tho flMl-nallolls fOllinulli.'rs, i >tn t.n.i BI-IS tlioui lnoki'vl ul'tcr. Tiii- ol ih.  dunk ol il'.e ill of .tii'l- llii- jnv--euc titirtti-o -in Tin- pl.iM tlmt 1-. bo i.ilKni oi .Ill i-.Hu.ltioll.ll b.MUt of lor Uu- .iiipiilniiiH'iii Uu- fvnoi' ol ,i h.ur.t ot ttiroo ni. to lio i-oitiirnio-i Uu- MMIMU-, ua-t U' i -irry on llu'ir 'iiUU'h atiiiul Mini' o! as H'UV U> lhi' oi i-on'fvii oi stale histiUitU'iis PAYNE MAKES STATEMENT TOEING THE LINE. I'TION lelcphnlU' win ii. s lie a lilt' .iitv will p.'U IlllinU l-.'lllllll .Hid I. filiation lit 1, lephiinc ami fM-htinnoi li.'- omilloll.U il !ol The Illlrd nl" I 111' fiweoli-y iii.i. ins lone, cUii.mi'o tolo- pliiinc Mi'ins luidei- the control of i .niniiisMon, l-> iu the liulldM of llie iiiiunilltiK i'li Iclcpli.inc. toUi-.l.iptl uliil RBUEF IS TO BE GIVEN SUGAR PLANTERS OF CUtSA. Twenty Tor Cont Meiluctlon tn ot All Other i'ruiiofcltlout 1'otntvtl Out -Ciilihiot Midi la Mo Vult. .M.iri Ii 6. -Chaii of the ways mul means i-nuiiult- loo today K.IVO. out ilio lolliuvhii; nu- ih.irls'.oil sl.iteiin-iil in comiiviioii ivllti Ule discussion ol' Cuban I think tho lurKiS n> ijnritv >u' ivpi-c.-i'ii- t.itivus havo m.uie up liiou- ml'.ul- uui-t ilo Aoiiuithtiift j.ir v'liKi. Th. n ilu-i-o propwltloin .1 lileli ll.lVO tlll.1 I'tHl III 'I'll" proposition .Mr. Motri- of Mmno-.'ii I'ucUiUs for .in In, re is.' in tiro i.uii'l iui In tho oiit-M'k- Vioi-K! and .1 II il.u-.i on Imi'oru-il not M .'in In luc Hint in my 1UO to Then tlu-ro Ihe "i Mi. tn unit dollars uirncilj I'lio. tlw OOIMM tii-asuiy ;iiul to ti-A thin'uii.in l.i iSl-'ti-lliiitn about olio million doHiii-. accordlni-: ID hH tlijiiiv-a, l.i name tiiin phinlt'i-.. Tills III'.-.'! K to lio. p.ild wltlKiiit liny eniupeni.ulloii (mm >'u- IM In any nr inuo iili'l to I'ul'.tn v.oveiniiient. U hurdly cc vi'toil l.i icpi'H for IM-.- i opinion of Inwjvr t'> Hint ''the iininilt'e vet -d li 'clmll for in-" I iiplUloll of wwjiT t'> hliy Hint hlli'lv iill- .iii.l iMMi'odimi tm of ,ii 11 or ii'-'s, to HM" j 'in i' ci-it .if H to p.iy ii hkii Mini 10 i.il uiiiil In eieiii' a pull, liin.l I roolpr.iea! .-mil the p.r. In- 'li.ioliiiiii lull llie ii-nuiii iRi- >'f "iir lni'.uli.iutloii Jiid H nino iiinllo'ls lillle.l. Thn Toai-li- ftGENT SAILOR PREPARES REPORT Gratifyiiic Increase iu Boot Sugar Pro- duction of United Statoe During Vast Tear, Washington, March F. Baylor of Des Moines, the special agent in charge of the beet sugar investigations of the department of agriculture, 19 in Washington making his annual report. He gave today to the Associated Press the following: figures: The total production of beet sugar in- the United States in the season 1901-2 has aggregated tons, an increase ot" U 'per cent from the tons pro- duced during the- season of 1900-1. There were thirty-one factories in op- eration in 1900, according to the census figures, and eleven more were started in 1901. There are nine factories in course of construction for operation in 1902. Other companies have been organized with a total capital stock of and would require annually a working capital, in addition, of Ac- cording to Special Asent Saylor thfy would purchase from the farmer an- nually beets to the amount of besides many other crude materials. FIVE MEN WERE KIIXED. Mine of Fntal Explosion in Catsbursr iltonougnliela Company. Monognhela, Pa., March ex- plosion in the Catsburg- mine of the Monongahela River Consolidated Coal and Coke company today resulted in the- death of five men and serious in- jury of five others, two fatally. The dead are: MINK BOSS P.OBERT HOWBT. -TAJIKS HOWEY, son of mine boss. ISAAC KASTWOOD. JOHN GOLDKR. M'FARLAND. Fatally injured: Ranger. James Tcrrent. On Monday a premature explosion of dynamite caused gas to ignite and since that time the mine has been burning. All the air channels were closed and jt was hoped that the flames would be smothered. This morning twenty men entered the mine to investigate. It is not explained what caused the explo- sion, but it, is thought that the turning on of the air, which had been shut off the fans, caused the jras which had accumulated to ignite. A terrible ox- plosion followed soon after the men cn- tpreri. A relief party, headed by Su- perintendent Seddon ;md Mine Inspec- tor made an effort and nearly succeeded in reaching the imprisoned men, but were compelled to return for ,nir. All were overcome and tonight ;ire in a serious condition. Three at- tempts. ;il! tolrl, were made to reach the men. but proved futile. Further efforts will be made during the night. At .1 late hour tilers is a crowd of women and children about the pit. Knrlil Carrier Debate. WaFhingfon, Mnrch hous-f, dp- vntcd another clay fii the' bill !ri thi' nirnl fr-.-f delivery ;'nd to pl.'K-f.- oHrru-rs nmlrr i-itt'.f iiiiercst was in the ths- fiissiin, A vote Is expected tomorrow. when he closed lie received congratu- lations of many of his colleagues. Early in the session ilr. In charge oi the pending shipping bill, ob- tained an agreement that Ib.e senate should vote on the measure arid all I pending amendments at 2 p. m. Mon- day, March 17.. that "being- entirely sat- isfactory to those opposed to the bill. Before consideration of the shipping bill was resumed, an extended debate occurred on the measure providing for the protection OL the president of the United States. Mr. Bacon Georgia took the ground that in its present shape the bill was an invasion ot the' jurisdiction of tho states, and that it ought to be amended carefully and rad- ically. Mr. Patterson of Colorado, while he agreed to the general proposi- tions of the bill, urged that it ought not to pass in its present form. No notion on the bill was taken. Resuming his speech on the shipping bill, begun yesterday, Air. Clay oi Georgia predicted the complete failure of the pending measure. Natural changes alone, he argued, could increase the foreign carrying trade oi' the Uni- ted States. Mr. Hanna then addressed the senate, his remarks being- principally in an- swer to Mr. Clay's speech of yesterday. He said that when Mr. Clay quoted from Mr. Frye's remarks that nil there was in this question which required legislation was embraced in the one question of labor, he was correct. "1 stand by that proposition, but 1 go fur- ther. The ore in the ground is wnrth about 25 cents a ton. After it was touched by the hand of man it was labor. Ninety-five per cent of the cost of a ship built in American ship yards or in any ship yards is purely labor. The cost of the construction of a ship in the United States as against that in either England, Germany or France simply measures the difference of wages and the efficiency of American labor." No AsuUtancoior Merchant Marine. Mr. Hanna declared that the mer- chant marine was the only industry in the United States which hfis not re- ceived the fostering care of this gov- ernmgnt. "Will anybody said he, "the absolute necessity o" having an for our n.ivy in the form of a merchant marine, shaped un- der the direction of the navy depart- ment and, in time war, absolutely in the hands and the control of the presi- dent of the United Slates to use it in the most effective Senator Hanna said that it tho United States failed to profit by tho ex- perience of the older countries of Europe, who have adopted a policy In reference to maritime matters, it would make a. most serious mistake. Every merchant ship constructed in foreign countries was meant to be a ship of wnr in time of need. Mr. Hanna cited the feeling of uneasiness along the Atlantic, coast at the be- ginning of hostilities with Spain and the relief which was experienced when the four steamers of tho American line were called by the secretary of the navy, under tho conditions of the law passed ;by congress, to perform picket service. "There is something more in this transportation he said, 'than nercly carrying- letter bags, there is more in it than dollars and cents lo the United States." He like it, he said, be discussed above party considerations, because f-veryonc a like pride in our cotintiy's ment and development ami whatever is best for the interests and safety anil the perpetuity of our institutions is best for all of us. Mr. Hanna declared that not an Americ.m ship yard hnd a contract for another merchantman after the nine or ten vessels now unclfr coiioSrtu tion were finishpfl. "Everybody continued Mr. Hanna, "that i lu- Uni- ted States is engaged in a ljar.d-lo- hand contest with foreign to secure the commerce of the Orir> it, anil the TnitPd 'States has been foremost and steadfast in its policy to the markets of China and hold thf-ni as an door. Tbo Philippine was (lie key to the Orient, lit and trans-shipped to South American ports. By carrying American goods iu Aiupri- ships there would bo nil increase of American truilc. Closing, ho again Uiverted U> Ifio r'tiepthm ot tbp of thi! laoor, maintaining: that. wngfM In this country averaged 50 cent higli- T than in European countries. The -owl of ships built in the United States was from 25 to SO per cent higher than those built in Gri-at Britain, the dllTcr- once in price of labor making the dlf- 'prence in cost. Tho difference' between the cost of opi'niling American ami foreign ships wus about 27 per cent, the highpr nitc1 hoinjf paid on Amt'H- can vessels. He- urged (hat Ihc pending measure be enacted lulu law as the one way to demonstrate to the- satisfnction of all that it would be beneficent in its operation. More as an important item than as argument to those who were riot yet convinced of tho excellent re- sults lo be obtained from the bill, be said IIP besought congress to keep pace with the world in exorcising the nat- ural advantages and resources of which all Americans were so proud. iVt the conclusion of Mr. Hanna's speech a resolution was adopted ex- pressing the sorrow of tho senate at tlit> death of Representative Polk (if Pennsylvania, and an an additional mark of respect the senate, at p. m., adjourned. KO DA.MACKS FOK SAILORS. Spautsli Treuty Claims Tumi Uown Suflitrorg of Bltilne. JIarc.h Tlip Spiinb'h treaty cbiims comnnisfllon, today handed a. decision ogainst, the claimants nf tbo deaths and injuries by oill- ctr.s and seamen in tho wreck oC bat- llc-S'hip Mainu, in Havana harbur. Tim commlsslcmi holds that tho "in- dividual of citizens! ot onu nation may arise against the KnvernniPnl an- other nation lor rctlrch.-a of Injuries to persons or property whk-hi sui-ih. injury may from siu-h Kovi'ia- mr-nt nr any of its agents, j'.nl Mjch in- dividual claJm.s -do ,iri.so in fa.vor of tho ouicorw and. si-urn  of a'-ts of a for.'ijrn povf-rnrr.eiit he th< rlw'nt ain 'ither tn r.hirn in- for wrongf. done by ii-icign KOV- i-.n' I'.'iiti.icl-i ttllli le-icliel i and llu< llas'.el.iiilM !i I I 1 hiiiiRlui; tlio time for UV.IMU.M- i nf in.li- Ui-itrlefs I" t.-iKo ollli.- n-oni lurch to jVnitust It IIUcwl-i r m'er from niiUn to iiilll.'i. The liiiiisn eirniinllteo on ooiinU- nnd owiK.hHi rceomiiicnded a Miilislllulo for lli.i I.ei-eli bill 'or tin' nompllatlon of IIIWN relulliiK lo ownMilpH nnd townslitp ollle.ci'.'i other Hum notices of llm pcued nnd eoiiMiihloH nnd .liclr ptihlteiillon In n volnmn lo he sold tit il.rm. Tim oiislnal hill thi) price, 11 fj Hi. The judlelary coniinittce if a lurgn volume of j estcniny. I'Sie inoHl Intportaiu iniiiLsure on which U. aeled WIIM IhiM-lui-Kc hill for jAHKIO i h-e codhleal Ion Mini u lorinlly of tlin lirw-, relullvii l''AV'iH.Wri. to liiflriiniiMitH, Thl-i l-i Ihf. Mil 1'iirlliei'cd l.y Ihe American P.ar It. 1ms hodi In elRhlecii .-lalcM nnd Iliu Dlnlrlut f I'olumbln. H doe.-i not make any [erlal HialiKo In the workinwn of prijienl on ni-xi-itkilde liifii'iMiioiilH, -hill Hm iltleH nnd condt them, Tlio Tou'iioend hill waf nNf reported for and ;dx other inniit- '.s ot minor liniiorlaneii were dhposm: of. Huperliilnndenl J'nwi'll nf illenwnoc ppenred the eonimlllco In linlmlf of Hi., bill lo the Hni-IIiiKton u I-IH of-wtiy Ihe l.'ind'i lit route. The IIOIIK onimllleo on nnd (irphiiii.V home hilled tli-o 1'nyno hill lo admit, the ol' KAldlert married prior in IMI.I, of ai Ihn law now !o tho Soldiers' home. Tl I'ccnnirnellded I'or tin   cenlf alihoUKh this latter detail not liuit ly sr-tllr-d upon an yet. Annlhcr I.ouln ISrllxiry St. March G.--A beiu h witri'an VV'.LS Jsucd today by .TudRr; Jty.in lor th arrest John H. Keeker, city factor Inspector, on the- -charge of bribery Th-- warrant, it K H.iiil. is based ti nn Jill'-Kf'1! to "llx" Ihe sjiccliil jury that W.IK in try ,t Uie.-nlii r of the1 ImllK" nf itl- dif i bv the IViiver jury on the charyu of bnijcry. iif cnur.io no ol' Ihlrt Mud cimlil e di: Lrlliule.l A t.enndiil iiint ,i xiul. In Ihe unvt phii-o f Ihn i.'nlmn would i.tlll remain 'llhonl 11 'tin ni tiii'it to n. Ion on the iiiKar limy Ixiiir.tit (in nc.-onnr. I1 tlu) hnlintv ii'- to otilulu ii l-iu lioio IhtH pbinti'i' liiinw hn wju to hiiv.i Uj per cent Iu th.ii, I r T.ivinoi'.s iii-opn.-itllnn linn over ili.it I'or n ai coin loilut Ion ami II II.IK the nauied. 'Hie tiUrd proposlllnii 1-i tlh-il for a er cnul roduotlnn nl' duly. Tlilr> i Him Ui% Imluilry, ('ouplnd ho pi-ovNIoii In exleiul our he oomnillten nn and nu--in-( i-on- elided thai It no dnpiri) home. In. All tinr.Hiil Ih.u' ihe prli'ii of nt.-.ir lo the American ciiivimiier emiiln tho Maine, N'or wmilil It limiire in i Tii'iu-llt nf tint trtiht. 'Hie wit. o.v  Klnllnli'w prove-thai ho triKi hiis reeelvod no lionolll !u Inn- iui1 Mie.iir eiKu-r In 'Hiiwull or I'ntMo lice, -luce the duly win reduced m m. iloved, 'nin eillll-K lii-Meltl-l luivn hceit eaped hy Iho phip.lerH Iu the'ie VVi> Vlino evcl-i- riMMill to believe Ihn nine would prove II-IIH mi to Culm. iiUliindliig iil.ileiiH'iitM ni lo Hm iiliitiid'i if tlio prehldfiil, Ihn cabinet mid llm mii.in republicans HIM nppotirhm In llm u'Wupnper.i. I cnn only tipoiik wilh onii- Ideiien or thn president. Hut 1 h.ivc every iiiiiuiriiuee Ihe i.ih. net 'l'i not divided on lire iiue'iilon, nor IIIH n. miilnrliy of llm I'IDIHC vepuhli- eommilled tlH'in-elven ellhor in ih.i UorrJK. tluiTnwuev or I lie p.d- ey. Tim of ,i :J'I per cent i'e- luetlon. it adopted, will put ,nr. In my tHlKuietil, If iiilopled, will pnl, i.ff. In inv nany yours. Who will not oonm uiitll hei1 iliilt-n, It will fi-om Itio iiiienllou for U'lioratlmiM to come and rent and I'amiulllly lo tin, hu-liii'-is If llm iniiiln no f'm-lhor eh.ini'o uiil in nmile unUI '.Vc Inivo iinneMilleii nn.l fi'i'H Iriule. To I'el'iue lo niullllm; ivnnlil pnl. the limij.ii hi n hos- Ho lo llm preAlonl, would cause imeie l.'iluly ,ind n loo" I'llo prodllcel-ll of would 'he iillerly iji'iii'di'iVllss'lnK Tlllrd The Ihli'd i-oul'cri-iiee ni1 lepublli'aii Ilinilllll'I'M ol' the llvt-n lo eminldor flic nl I'libnn lill'llf cmicodHlmill U'lIK belli IdlllKllt 111 Illi' lln.il ol' Hie limin1. Ahoul IJB inepi wen- prcKciil ami KI'I-.I! wni niiillll'cMleil, invliiK In Iho Klini'p IImI him doom red belucen llm Miipportei'Mdl'ilio wiivii ami meaii'i pnip- oHllliui per eenl i-i-eipruciiy, HM put forth by Clmlnnan I'aviie, .mil liie ey of Mluuefinln. I'liur Iu llm iiK' Hpenkcr I leinlci'tioii nml Hop- eMenlallve Cnniuui id' HlliiiilH, Ihc he limiHii nml In luno held a I'lii-llier ciuil'i'i-i'iiee with the urenldenl on Ihe iilliinlliin. Win n Viiiiln imule nn cxleiiiii'il Miiet'ch. Hcnllnif nlijeclliiiin In Ihe Tawiiev prnpoHlllon. lie imilnlnineil thai nlveti n hiimily In Cuhnim mil In iinrmiHl il iitinnnl. ly phin. Hfiylnir Ihcre were Hniiie llinuiKli UK) nildille- ineii, HU lluil It unlllil be ImiKiHHllile In make iui eiiullabh'- illHlrlbutloii. Mr. rcfrjri'i'd Iu Ihe wMoHnrouii HCII- tlitionl of Ihe III'CHH I'a vnt'ablo In reelii- rni'iil rnnrcHHliiMEi. WIIH by u lire (if us lie iiru- ceeck'd. Mr. Dulzcll ilPclnrnrl lluil. the ropuh- lleiui parly )uid never run itvvity fnim nn IfiMiif! mul II nhoiild nol run nway frnin this one. Ifu spoke (if I'l'i-itshletil; HiKiHevcll.'M jHiMlMnn nml reml from llii> prenldeut'si mi-UHHKi-. fuvorlnif reel- jirni-lly. Al nne pulnl Iti-prciuinlatlvn Mfilinu (if f'oiinfiylvntilii, Inlcrjeeteil 1lnt "HuppoHc 'fluhn'fi pi'iiiluelH were arid nlnel liif-ileail nf nnil lohaeco, fhiiuld they rccelvi! per cent. Inrlfr One (if, the T'lillni'ldplilu niemberw nrlderi Ihe Hliileninnl that hhi illulrlnl; did not frtvnr Ihe redproclly plan. Mr. Dnlznll pi'iuieeiieil with hill ui'KU- miMil, nuiltitalnliiK that from Ihe ulainl- rinlrit nf wKpodlency mirl practiuallty Ihn J'nyno plan nffercil Iho hiiHl doln- llun of Llic iit-nhleni. Tlepri'Heiitn I Ivr- of Ohio, resenting HIP old Mi'Klnlcy dliitrUfl, followed In a Hpooeli that. there should be no lnrnarl.1 In tho doc- trine- nl' prrd loll. JtiiprnMentiiUvri Mnlion followed the brief hri had ol! Mr, 'by prcKcul- IHC; a reMolulloii for Hie poHtponoinont of lhr> ftillro Hiibjeel, until the imxt rlou nf coiKjreiid, In the courm! of n, lihorl Mpeecli h" il'.'darod tlmt tho west hart Blood by I'niilinyivanln vvtUMl UiOI'ii WHS! not a KtnokeHlnck In Ihd west, anil In return ho prnuoflnrl lo Ktaml by licet pugitr HinokBHlnclc of tho went. HcnrcHerilativc! of Mlcblium BnuKlit lo rocoKUlllon for a altion Hlmllur to thnl. of Mr. Million, poribponltiK itciion, but the rcxolntlou wan nol. formrilly prosi-ntcd. Hcpre- Rcnljtllvc Ij'irts of KdnHiiH Mpoke In fa- vor of tho Puyn'i nnd liml not oornplderi hlH M'Kumt-nf. nl, 11. o'clock, hi; to iWpOHlter llender- pon. Tho latter counseled Ihc. fulk'Hl lliefiire ncliori trike-n iu order that differences mlsht 1m rscon- cllfid nnd .111 nrnlc.able reaob'icl. The opnnknr'H HilKpunllou met Hccept.iiicc at ponfTPtico adjourned tinlil next TucKdny nlRlit. f'hlciiKO, March H.-Tht; Gcors't' M. Hill compsiny, pulillshc is, went. Into th-i hnndK ol' a. icmporury receiver today. by order of .lucllvi Kohlna.it of th-'r TTnltcd Klalew diHltlet court. em- liiirrsiKHment. of the firm is alii Ihulivi In (iver-produc-ll'in. Tim Mini expeetH rC'Puni'i buKliias.s in n. Phnrt time If il, CHII (ft rid ot some of Its present stock. Us liabilities nre r bruit unil it4 nssfts about, th" same. WEATHER FORECAST Mitrr.h For JKln or mnow FriiJuy. Mil lirdiiy roldor, Svltli f.iir In TvcntorTi and rain or MIOIV in enut- ern iNEVVVSPAPERI EWSPAPE.R!   

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