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Des Moines Daily Leader Newspaper Archive: February 6, 1902 - Page 1

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   Des Moines Daily Leader (Newspaper) - February 6, 1902, Des Moines, Iowa                                THE DES MOINES DAILY LEADER IT-FOURTH YEAR, SO. 32. DES MOINES IOWA, THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 0. 1903. HE POWERS STOOD JTION BEFORE OUT- OF SPANISH WAR. OTn of Wkich Credit from BrJtlm. Feb. The Associated en put in possession ot the .patches -which have never published and which are )ly authentic. They cora- .ular telegram of the Span- ent to her representatives the European courts ana n the replies: ot state to his majesty s is abroad (circular tele- rch 25 Spanish rep- o Washington has just re- e is informed by the United iment that on Monday next tha American commission on tastrophe will be brought be-' without previously commvj- same to us or having the rt communicated to them. isons stated in my telegram and in view of the fact of >n of that matter to a popu- thus taking it out of the f the executive a step opinion, may provoke a eon- the two nations-the Spanish deems it a duty, and con- be in accordance with the iverning international ma- il Christian powers, to com- facts to that government at its friendly offices (to in- cident of the United States within the jurisdiction of tne bearing on the ques- with Spain, in order Bin to an honorable settle- so convinced is Spain that h her and that she is acting ce that if ths above men- 5 not attained she doss not ask the advloe of the great in the last term their arbitra- settlement of difficulties now of those which may, in the disturb tie peace .which the on wishes to preserva as far a with her honor and tha tn- :r territory; this not only for Its but also for the conse- ilch the wax, once begun, 'or the other countries of Eu- larica. >ad this telegram to the mln- eign affairs of that country. Gullon, ambassador, to the minis- ch 25, This afternoon I ong conference with the min- reign affairs and have oom- him your circular telegram he last verbal note presented ter of the United States. tion would facilitate an understanding between the United States and Spain. Nevertheless, our government commis- sioned Herr von Radowitz, the German ambassador to Spain, to inform the Madrid government that Germany was not in a. position to prevent the Span- ish-American war. "After that several attempts were made to win Germany, or the dreibund, for intervention, in which the pope was especially active. The final result was that Dr. von Holleben (German ambas- sador at Washington) was instructed 1 to join In the step proposed by Austria only in case all the other five great powers "We are unable to state the details of how the united action came about. At any rate, the collective note was hand- ed to officials at Washington April 7, advising a peaceable settlement, and was signed by England, France, Italy, Austria, Russia and Germany. li was believed for a week that war would be averted. General Blanco received or- dars from Madrid to offer the Cuban in- surgents an armistice, for Spain was resolved to give them far-reaching autonomy and to arrive at a settlement of the Maine question through arbitra- tion. Diplomatic circles, however, en- tertained no illusions and when Eng- land, April 14, through her ambas- sador, proposed a new collective note, in which the powers should declare that Europe regarded America's armed in- tervention in Cuba as unjustifiable, the other ambassadors telegraphed to their home governments asking for instruc- tions. The step failed through Ger- many's positive refusal. This gives, as it appears to us, a picture essentially different from the English end. A fort- night later war was declared. "Afterwards, in June and July, while the United States was making groat progress in the Philippines, England tried to induce the Spaniards' commis- sion in England to ask for peace pro- posals, for to no power was the Amer- ican encroachment in the Pacific more annoying than to England. "The above is the historical connec- tion of events. We hope that, in giv- ing the same, we have thoroughly ex- posed the absurdity the English legend." London, Feb. 5. The Associated Press has the highest official authority for denying the story printed hy the Kreuz Zeitung of Berlin todny as to the part taken "by Lord Pauncefote, the British ambassador at Washington, in the Spanish-American war interven- tion, in spite ot the of the story by the German foreign oflice. FATAL EXPl OF GAS __ CHICAGO BLOWN INTO KINDLI Ten From tlie RBtni Three Othi Ttoni Known to Have Feriihed lotion Followed by Fire, WU mad Rapidly. Chicago. Feb. lives were lost, many people slightly injured, two buildings at 372 and 374 Twenty-second street were wrecked and J50.000 damage was done by an explosion of BUS to- night at ,the intersection of Twenty- second street and Archer avenue. Following are the dead: OTTO TROSTEU 3S years old; butcher. MRS. OTTO TROSTEU aged S6 years. OTTO TROSTKL, JR., aged 3 years. iuem street, many ot the with iear. On several etreet cam near the windows were Breeched un ptissengers severely shaken up. people in the cars saw ths Barnes gush from the ground, all hands rushed for the doors. A number of persons were bruised and knocked down lu the excited exit. One car filled with passengers was thrown frem tho tracks. Amonjf the dead are suptxnsed to bo children of the Trostle ftxnilly. whone bodies have not yet been recov- ered. It is not known positively that they were in the house at the time, but a search of the neighborhood hus not shown any trace of them. There were BILL FOR STOCK PAVILION WILL BE INTRODUCED IN SENATE BY HOPKINS TODAY. W1U Cmll of for BulUlne SloilUr to the Ooe I111..1. Slat, ralr Work of Senator Hopkins will introdif- in the senate today the bill of ihc Utah de- partment of agriculture authorizing un appropriation of BW WO for tho erection F1RKPKOOF of a. stock on STRUCTUUK. the s I   'iVwu-oml. providing for a bond when an action is eommeiu-ed for the violation of ter 6 title 12 of the v-o.te, house (lie by Willrtt, jMovidlnK that the (oiiniy attorney in i-.ti-es pro- and !1U> Indictaients without the intei-vemUm of the jury. The only iiuvnUon with committee as to the Wlllut related to its con- stitutionality. PRICE, THREE CENTS___ WOULD MAKE CUBA STATE NEWLANOS INTRODUCES AN NEXATION RESOLUTION, iBTltKtlon lo4Ua to Vint m Ttirrllory and Later Vutf It HOW BRENTON'S OPPONENTS MIGHT SECURE A GENERAL ATTENDANCE AT HIS VAUDEVILLE. that, as the crisis has reached joint and demands rapid ac- ;ht that, besides actively co- i obtain a European eoncsrt, Hcaeious thing in these J be that France should ad- ad invoking the traditions of 1 policies regarding Cuba from ig of the century, and pro- both nations act In common to peace. er for foreign affairs accepted on in principle and asked me time to think and to submit to the council of ministers. Leon y Castillo. ty's ambassador at the holy ninister of state rch 25, have commu- Sardlnal Bampolla your tele- night relative to the declara- d from the minister plenipo- the United States. His emi- ssed himself much impressed ;ments which I made to him. res ot the answer you Ive to the American goverh- es the calmness and modera- recommends leaver to'Induce the European USB their influence in 'Wash- void a war. He is convinced i, -whose form of government lire- suspicions to the United nimated by the most friendly toward Spain. He will inform f my manifestations and as- ve have the affection of the Merry. X- ty's ambassador, to the minis- [arch under secre- eign affairs writes me that Mr. i taken into earnest considera- slegram and the peaceful pur- Spanish government; that the Inet sees with regret any jn- may unnecessarily disturb the etween Spain and the United i t t> )ur telegraphs to the British in Washington and directs mds an opportunity, to inform ;r (the secretary of state) of itory attitude of the Spanish t. (Signed) Gascon. sty's ambassador, to the min- ite larch 27, minister of lira believes it necessary that oE the Spanish commission on bo published as a counter posi- American report, and in order arbitration. I a 4 dcrs the maintenance of the ie one of the most important Europe today and thinks that action should be principally cop. (Signed) Hoyos. sty's ambassador, to the min- .te sburg, March 27, have long conference with the min- oreign affairs. ssed great sympathy for Spain iasm for the queen and assured ie emperor of Russia was ani- similar sentiments. Villagonzalo. ambassador, to the min- te Vlarch 27, liave just conference with the minis- 'oreign affairs to whom I ained in detail the inconceiva- ct of the government oC tho ites as compared with the pru- moderation of the Spanish gov- I then read to him a French i ot your telegram. He an- e with visible conviction that n 'government, Tjeing: animated ist friendly sentiments towards regent and the Spanish nation iliately act in the direction you He supposes that our govern- have addressed all the great the same manner and considers should reach an understanding i. 9 ng he repeated his affectionate and good will towards our (Signed) Mazo. __, ___ HISTOBT KEPT STRAIGHT oreifn Office Tells Spanlrt War obi England of Claimed Credit. Feb. German foreign firms the substantial accuracy ibjoined statement which the itung prints today relative to 's course toward the United ring the war with Spain. The. ident of the Associated Press ids that the article was pre- Professor Schiemann, pro- history at Berlin university, >ys special official sources of Ion. After a preface quoting raent made by a British for- official to a representative sociatecl Press January 21 last, "Almost exactly four years panish ambassador here asked whether Germany would lead against the United States for Action of the monarchic prin- he answer was a definite re- d Ihe same answer was given later, or about the middle of when the invitation reached to participate in the inter- mdertaken upon the initiative ta. This UMS in the weeks fol- Ihe sad <-ataslrophe of the Ften It was believed interven- SPAPERflRCHh TUR8RD TO SDB-COIIITTEE Scale ProWem Too Larie to Be Handled by Fall Joint Scale Indianapolis, Ind., Feb. The laTior ot solving the ecale problem between the mine operators and United Mine Workers was taken from the joint scale committee this morning and turned over to a sub-committee with instructions to enter at once on a con- sideration of the scale propositions submitted by the miners and report at the earliest possible moment to the general committee, which will then call the joint conference together to act upon the result. The subcommittee was in session all afternoon and at adjourned for a night session without having arrived at satisfactory conclusions. As understood the operators in the meeting of the joint scale committee have set their faces sturdily against the 10 per cent increase and the ran mine and differential propositions and have openly announced they would not recede from this position. The operators will, as a compromise, agree to the price for mining coal now In force for another year and will grant the demand for an open powder market. On the other hand the miners, as reported, have served notice on the operators that there will be no aban- donment of the demanded ab- solute run of "mine, the seven cent dif- ferential between pick arid machine mining and the uniform scale for all outside labor at the mines. DEMOCRATS. TO HOLD FcoiPEBHCB Methods for Uniting the to tlie Nation Will Be Dliouwed at New York Meeting-. New York, Feb. Prominent demo- crats from many states will attend the reception to be given at the Manhattan club February 22, when plans for unit- ing the party in the nation will be dis- Patrick A. Collins, mayor ot Boston, will speak on "The Democracy of New England." Former Senator David B. Hill will have for sub- iect "The Democracy of the Middle States." Gen. Charles TS. Hooker will respond for the democracv the south. Some equally prominent democrats probably some editors, will be invited to speak for the middle west, while the views of the party men in the far west be expressed by one of their num- ber, to ba decided upon later Edward M. Shepard will have for his subject "Washington." COME BIG JIM INSULT THE DEAD AMDTElLtlOWHE'i.L'HP COMMIT RIOT TROSTEL. a sou 7 years. ANMTE TROSTEU aged 9 years. MAMIE aged 11 years FRED ivjphew of Otto Trostel, aged 2i years; butcher. SOPHIE KNIGHT, domestic ill Trostcl family. BOSBNTHAIj. aged S3 years, 211 374 JJD WARD KATJFERT, aged 14 years. with Mrs. Kaufert. Tlie injured: Lucy M-erranosky; cut on head and face b Andrew Finstalki; cut, arid internal in- Augist Rosier; cut about face. Sing blown through window-; cut and bruised. Nellie Mcrchand; cut by glass Kata Seaver; cut oil face and head. Emma Folz; cut by glass. .T. W. cut by glass. Mrs. J. W. cut and badly Tj'mothy Moynihan, fireman; hands bad- yp. F. Donohuc, fireman; lett arm cut cut by J P Collins, street i-ar conductor. blown Uirougli car from end to cud; rut slight internal in.iurles. A Barnes, street car conductor: blown from car into street; hadly bruised. Long List of Injured iHOTHER ROIiL 60EST IS COMISG Crown Prlnee of Plan, ft Trip tba Unltea States the Coming Season. Tokio, Jan. 24., via Victoria, B. There is a possibility that the crown prince of Japan may visit the United States before long. He has long ex- pressed a wish to travel in America and Europe and has now taken tlje necessary preliminary steps oC com- municating his desires to his majesty, the emperor._______________ Department Appropriation Bill. Washington, Feb. o.-The legislative, executive and judicial appropriation bill, carrying- the appropriations for numerous branches of the government service, was completed today by the house, committee or about half a creases are on'account of rural free de- livery. It is proposed in the bill to con- tinue for another year the temporary force of employes now in the treasury, war ana postoffice departments, whose services are necessary because of in- creasing workings incident to the war with Spain. A genera.! provision is made against paying compensation to public employes who are "Incompetent or incapacitated, this term being substituted tor the pres- ent law against persons "permanently in- capacitated." The report on the bill gives the result of an inquiry as to the extent of leaves of absence of govern- ment employes, showing 'an average of 33.8 days of total leave last year. An Anti-Anarchist Bill. Washington. Feb. anti-anarchist hill which will be reported to the. houso In a day or two. contains one feature not heretofore alluded to. This is a pro- vision giving to foreign ambassadors and ministers accredited' to Washington pro- tection against assaults and punishing -with death any such assault which re- sults in the death of. a. foreign am- bassador or minister. The section pro- vfdUiB for severe penalties for .consp ra- cies in this country against foreign rulers does not. however, embrace ambassadors in! mini-UTS, as Chairman Ray ot the iudielarv committee, who h drafting the reoort feels that great care is necessary to exceed the right to nuni'h originating within the tinted The protection of foreign rulers "lirst con'plraeies Is considered iu.Mt- hv the'law of but it i-- not The list of injured might be extended to seventy-five or one hundred, as there were many people in the neighborhood who slight from fly- ing- gXss or slight bruises -caused by but whose names have not been reported. Only one of the bodies ot the that of little Lena '1 has been recovered. All thai, is known oF the fate of the other twelve reported dead is that they are thought to have the most of them are known to have in the demolished houses, and since the explosion, no trace of them has been found. The cause of the explosion is un- known and it has not yet been deter- mined whether it was sewer gas or illuminating gas. Mams filled with the latter were instantly ablaza after the explosion and a. succession of explo- sions followed, the flames shooting up through the manholes in the street. It will be difficult to ascertain whether the illuminating gas exploded or wheth- er the mains were broken by tlie ex- plosion of sower gas. Many people living in the vicinity be- lieve' that the first explosion was in a main at Twenty-second street and Archer avenue. Two other explosions of gas followed so quickly that it was hard to distin- guish them. First to explode was a main at Twenty-second street and Archer avenue. Then the manhole half a block south on Archer was thrown into the air by a lourt explo- Flames leaped and roared from the hole. The lire spread below the street and smaller manholes were blown into from the first gas rnain shot high into the air and reached. with the aid of the wind, the Trostle six children-in the famiiy, and there! is little doubt that all the eight membera of the family were killed. The three other people who are said to be dead are supposed to be cus- tomers in the meat market at the time of the explosion. The direct cause of the explosion is not yet known, but all indications show that it was due to escaping in the basement of the Trostle iiouse. The explosion came -without an in- stant's warning. There was a dazzlinK Hash, a deafening: roar and a cloud of dust and shattered timbers where the Trosllu house had stood. On both sides of Archer avenue be- tween Twenty-second and Twenty- third streets every pane of glass was blown out and a number of the resi- dents in the damaged building-s suffered slight injuries from flying glass. Adjoining- the Trostle building on the west, at 374 Twenty-second street, was a two-story frame building, in which John McLeod had a saloon. It van- ished in. the same second as the meat market. It was reported that one or two people were killed here, but the story coulO not be substantiated. In tho ruins of the buildings occu- pied by Trostle and McLeod flames burned so liercely that even though the inmates had not been killed by the first force of the explosion they must have met a quick death by fire. Clone to the Trostle building stood the People s hospital, a small affair, which had but a few patients. The building was bad- ly wrecked and every window in it blown out, but none of the patients was injured. One of the- hospital attendants sus- tained slight cuts, caused by ilyinK glaas. The patients were hastily, re- moved to safer quarters in the neigh- borhood by the firemen. SIV 1IVKS WERE JLOST. Corrected of the Victim! of the St. J.oals Fire. St Louis, Feb. was. positively stated today hy the fire department that only six men lost their lives in last night's fire. Three of the bodies have been recovered. The dead are: AUGUST first assistant chief. MlCIIAlSfj KEI1OE-. assistant foreman foreman com- ral 'BUNDON. pipeman company No. eu was a three-story frame structure and it had been weakened and nearly wrecked by the shock It is supposed that the occupants of tlie building were knocked unconscious or were tw panic-stricken to rush from the The flames caught thj welther-worn timbers. The dry and rotting wood was food for the fire, and in an instant the flames had enveloped the structure. With a roar the bui d- ine collapsed, and the occupants, with one exception, were carried with it to eag building, a two-story structure, llared tip, the next building was wrapped in flames, and then an- other structure caught fire. Entlro Kloek ThronKmrd. It seemed that the whole hiock would be wiped out before the firemen could bring the blaze under control. A fire wall of a brick building: at the corner of Archer avenue and Twenty-second street held the fire in that direction. On the west of the burning bulidinKS were two small one-story rottages. They were u. few feet from the burn- ing building; and that snvp the {Ire- men ,m opportunity of holding off the 'window glaas throughout the naigh- "FRANK MCBRIDK. truckman. CHARLES KKKNNING, pijiemnn com- pany No. 12. The injured, none of whom are ser- iously hurt arp: Chief Swinglc.v; hurt by falling brlckB. AVm Wann. forpman company JJo. 13; hurt about hips legs. Patrick Mcfarlhy. ftnfflnocr company No. K; Ftrutk by Hilling bricks. Monroe Moore, electric light Inspector; fell through a .shaft; bruised and Vrank VTm. Jurlg. driver for Assistant Chief Thierrj; fractured skull and in- ternal injuries. c Frank Lingo, assistant driver S truck; bruisfd, and hurt internally. rhief Swlngley, who was knocked down and stunned by flying debris, soon recovered and bent all his energies to rescuing the men in the ruins. Cominl'.tee Fa Tom SIosj. Washington. Feb. 5. Honso election No. 1 today dectdpd the con- election case McKenzie Mosi RciiiW Representative Rhea. democrat. of Kentucky, for tho seat of the Third Kentucky district in favor of the con- testant recommending the unseating of Mr Bliea. The vote was on party linns, the" democrat-; voting against unseating iftelr colleague Tile contest is In- volving- alleged, election irregularities state fair grounds nt SprlnRlicld. ami it Is proposed to follow these plans In erecting the building In DeK Moines. The bill was prepared yesterday after Mr. Brown's return and a number of the members of the bonrd now in city had inspected the plans. The bill uill probably Introduced In house today also. The building "contemplated will be n steel and brick fireproof structure wherein live stock exhibits may be shown and judged to the beHt posfiltiln advantage. Tlie dimensions'will be 17B by 225 feet, and the show arena 120 by 170 feet. H will have a seating rapa- city of It Is Relieved by Secre- tary Simpson ot' the department tlmt tho bill will meet, with a favorable re- ception toy the legislature, as then; is, he thinks, a great need for it. "we at the state fair last he nald. "within 100 head of as many cattle ua were at the Chicago live stock exposi- tion had more Shorthorns than Chicago had. This year a sixth pre- mium has toeon added to the beef breeds and the indications are. there will be many more cattle exhibited than there were a year ago, to Hay nothing the excellent prospects tin to other kinds of live stock. Under the circumstances, I believe there will be a senti- ment toward erecting this building. The merger bill Introduced In the senate oy TTubbard Tuesday was the subject of no end of discussion yester- day. No denial is MERGER 13ILL longer made that the jH i." introduced to DISCUSSED, further the Northern SccurJties plan by those best competent to understand Its inwardness. There IK run son to be- lieve the bill is bPlng furthered by a powerful lobby of railroad attorneys that has been gathering into the city wince last Sunday. This lobby Is keep- ing a careful eye on the developments In railway taxation matters and is helping along the Arlhaud bill to re- peal the law whereby cities and towns may vote aid to railways. The pur- pose in aiding this bill is mi obvious one__to strike a blow at the interurban lines which an; threatening serious competition with the steam lines. The sub-committee of the senate ways and means committee that to consider railway assessment legislation held a meeting yesterday afternoon. This was the first meeting of the aub- commillee and it developed 111 lie, the lime being take.n up with a. discussion of an informal nature of various phases of the railway assessment situation. The house on con ticn of pul'Hi- oflleiTS voted to repm- for pussHge yesienluy Cmnuiinss' to the Mil FOR INORKASK of Uw dlsti'U-l IN PAY .HulBfS. The lull OF JVIVSHS. odsimilty tor ;in increase from to AM aiiK'iulod ami uv- immcmlml by the committee. It pro- vides for ;iu increase to The committee Imlolinuoly poslpon-x! OH- ll'immin hill, to require payment of iinuuy iitunniy? monthly, uiut u-.i- ilertnl :i heui nift Sheriff Mntti'in mill repivwiit.'iUve.x of tho St.-ue- soci.'tlon of ShiM-lftn on the "111 to thn salaries "t deputy shenrfu im-1 pro- vide for their payment the fees nve not nufliclem to meet the cost of deputy hire. The housu miiMluK niul lo.in commit- tee gnve a to a number ot bmMlnR and lomi men, who seek tlie pi.MKiuro of house We SI, tin- 1'HI to strike out tho 1-co.uUwuent (hut the secretary ft the .issooliUlou ve- iiort the slum-holders   laws on asHeasiiifiit of them? companies-. The rhanKea soutlht. In tntj mnl" thnt reports for purposes Khiill be mud" to the t uy ol' oxecutlvf ixuini-ll InsU'iul ol to tlK- nti'ilior of iiml thnt tviin- piinloa sluill hi' riMiulreil to provide coiintv auditors with phitn showiiiK tho lunouiit of lint' In <-'ich govenuiient sub- division. Tho committee will 1'VHiK out two bills on theso will he prepaivd by n. nub-commit Ieo con- hlstliiK of ICilwnrdB. HntHClnnitlt mul Mil tics mul will relnto to toUvrapli inul U-lephoiui compunli'S. Tho ollu-r will ivliite to companli'U anil Will he pn-pnrcil by 11 nub-commit of Uirrabee, Ullchrisl. mul (ireene. The conimHtoo on public, hi'iilth ol the house decided to report fiivonilily on the Huchanan bill to the sale of iinvUnc except on iirwcrlptltm milieu ami nilninpr commit- tee netert fiivorubly on tho Kulidiill bill iflntliiK to the competency of niemlier.s ut the hotird of for Btiilo mine The inllllary committee, took fnvor- nble uction on Ihe Teiichoilt bill Intend- ed to authorize tho Uen Mollies Witter Works eompuny lo use the liiKliwnys tu lay malnn to the iirmy post. Tlio Rriice-Kuiiiicrt content UK lo tho senatorshlp of Iho Cium-Shelby dlnlvlct u neariiiB n close. Tha count IH com- pleted on all but Cuss CONTEST mul Noble "NEAR mid the vole of IhoHO THK OLOS10 lowiwhlpn will bfi tlll- Uhed today. AH thn ult- Uiitlon now sluuilK Iti-uce la 20 votes iiheuil mid ho IH conlldent. of wlnnlnR. After thn count M the evl- cimieo of witiicwsew, Juduea atid IIH to allogcd IrreRUlnrltlefi will be taken by thn com-nJtlce. Washington. Feb. New lands of Ntvmtu. of the tvnd me.ins ronunlttiv, who WHS ihe author of the ri'soUUiou for tlie annexation of HawHll. today Intivdiieod a Joint r.'so- lution liivliniK tin- ntmtillo of Cuba tu iHiixune ;i ptirt of the 1'iiited ilrat ji  and tlmt iiBiilnnt the r'lilnow. nlono WKH nol to tha imblln luteres Primldnnt Oompnra nf the Ferjerallon or continued his Blatement in support of (tin lilll. Hn oxhtWted of Instructions mint by Hie hlnewi to their friends In f'hlnti, iiolnllng out itwi way to ret Into Hill country. Mr. also stated thai Maxwell KvyH of New York who advocated an exlemlnn of Um fJ'-aVy law. hntl litluck.d Hint l.iw In the miDieme eonrt and tti.it the tentlori nf Invalidity wni "till lufor- the court, 'I'In; hearing lonliniie lornni- row. ______ Hause K Compollcil. S-Tlm tiili-cotninlt- tee, of thi) ensile eommitl- on foreisn nvlallonf. whl'-h been giving attention to tlio legal nip- c t t t nroclty luiullei, today roiinrleil lillndlnM to the full rornmlttuo and Senator hiiann- er wan to a writ en report on the The commitle.. em elides th.it the uuncr to mahe enmmci- Invorvo of taHff don-, rmt re'i- It that the nlxiiild WBATHER PORBCASf Wn.Iiinitton. r, -For Iowa: Snoir 1-rnb.l.l.T rolder I'rlilHj; vnrlablo wlndf, liicomlnc north-   

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