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   Council Bluffs Nonpareil (Newspaper) - January 2, 1956, Council Bluffs, Iowa                                The Weather Council Bluffs and Vicinity- Clear and cold Monday night; low in mid 20s. Tuesday increas- ing cloudiness and continued mild. High in upper -ESTABLISHED IN 1857 -fl COUNCIL BLUFFS ONPAREIL to SOUTHWESTERN IOWA VOL. 2 Telephona 4061' COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 2, 1956 PRICE 5 CENTS Egypt Rejects Bank Strings On Nile Loan Difficulties Pose Serious Threat1 To U. 5.. British Offer By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON Egyptian Premier Gamal Abdel Nasser has protested hotly_ against some of the conditions imposed -on a British-American offer to help Egypt build a huge dam on the upper Nile River. It was learned Monday that Nasser in effect has rejected some of the economic control strings attached to the offer by the World Bank. i Unless the difficuliips can be resolved, this poses a serious threat to the U.S-British offer to help build what would be one of the wcrld's greatest dams and thus, it is hoped, deliver set- back to Russian designs on The Communists, through Czechoslovakia, already are sup- plying planes and tanks to and Moscow is reported bv diplo matic sources to be prepaid to put 250 million dollars or more into the dam project. Nasser Has Choice Nasser therefore has a choice between Moscow and Washington in this instance. U.S. Ambassador Henry By- roade is due to leave Cairo Tues- day for two weeks of consulta- tions here. The negotiations over the dam are a prime reason for his return. Britain and the United t States informed Nassar three weeks they were ready to give Egypt 70 million dollars as a starter for construction of a great darn, a hydroelectric and irrigation pro- ject, on the Nile River at Aswan. The project is estimated to cost Hround SI ?0fl 000.000 over perhaps IS years. The Egyptians say they need around 400 million dollars in foreign financing. Under the Western plan Britain and thp United States would joint- iv up about 200 millions and thp World Bank wonM Egypt a Ion "-term loan for a pirhilar amount. The World Bpnk has not formally pledged such P loan but has rr-ado clear thnt thp will pet the money once ''iev rrfl'e a MaH. Certain Cond tions But the bank has tentatively nt- l-chcd certain conditions. One is Hi Fit controls and watch rloa; nrncrdnrps should be 'he b.r'nk in the management of economy. Thr bank's po- litinn is Hint it '.sanK to he sure thnt rronomic whif-h it fonsVUrs unsound will not icopar- d'-'e its loan, Nasser is rpportpd In have told Rvronde bluntly he considers that an unnecessary intrusion into Font's af-i'rs and in tome ro- Tmrts a demand on Quadrup'et Boys Born At Lancaster LANCASTER. Pa. let boys were born Monday to the 26-year-old wife of a post office j worker. The first of the four babies was born to Mrs. Regina I lohcmvater at a.m., CST, and the others then followed quickly. The father, Norman C. Hohenwa- ter, 27. is -employed in a Lancas- ter post office sub station. The couple has two other children, boy and a girl. Doctors at Lancaster General Hospital said all month placed in incubators. All were given an excellent chance to survive. Hohenwater said that he and his wife had expected twins. Hot Disoute On Farm Supports Sen. Johnson Takes A Crack At Benson WASHINGTON JP Sen. Hum- phrey (D Mmn.) predicted Monday (hat a dispute over new Ipgislation designed to bolster saggine larm income "will cause the hottest bat- tle in the Senate this session." Humphrey, a member of the Agriculture Committee, opposes the flexible price support system strongly bs.ked by President Ei- senhower and Secretary of Agri- culture Benson. He is one of a number of sena- tors who have forecast a tough fight, generally along party lines, over the question of how best fo reverse the downward trend of ag- ricultural prices and income. Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson of Tex- Admiring The First Baby is his mother. Mrs. Carol Ask Senate Inquiry Into 12-Week Strike WASHINGTON Ten Demo- cratic senators said Monday "the public interest requires an early Senate inquiry" into the 12-week- old strike of tmghouse Elec- tric Corp. employes. "The stalemate seriously harm.; not only the best interests of the company, its stockholders and em- ployes, but also the welfare of the country as a they said in a joint statement. In proposing a Senate inquiry, they s-poke of the "deeply disturb ing circumstances" of the stnki and what they called "the appar ent failure of collective bargain ing despite many weeks of discus sion." Iowa Traffic To C Courtier. The baby s name is Ricky Nonpareil Photo. First 1956 Baby Is Boy; Born To Carol Courtiers as, the Democratic leader, took crack at Benson Sunday in tclt- np reporters the Senate will be asked to act early this year on a cure for "three years ot Bensoniz- ng thc farmers." No. 1 Trouble Spot Terming the low 'level of farm income "the No. 1 trouble spot" m the nation's economy, Johnson said: "It is generally by some Republican their program has been a failure and has got to be reworked something has to be done early in the session." Eisenhower is planning to sub- mit new farm legislative recom- mendations in a special message, I perhaps later this month Sen. Francis Case (R-SD) said in an interview that unrest in thc farm belt "could cause" the reten- tion of Democratic control of Con- gress in the November elections, but thai he does not think that will occur. Bettor Conditions "I think conditions in November fpim areas will be much bet- The New Year was only four hours and 33 minutes old Sunday when little Ricky Gejie Courtier arrived to be the first New Year's baby in Council Bluffs. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carol Courtier, 1619 Seventh Ave. And he was born in Jennie Ed- mundson Hospital. "It's certainly a happy event." said Mrs. Courtier. "And I'm very thrilled it happened on New Year's Day." Courtier is employed by the Omaha Production Co. This is the second child for the Courtiers. They have a daughter, Nancy, 3. The new baby weighed 8 pounds, ounces. The second New Year's baby also arrived at Jennie Edmund- son Hospital, when a son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Coulton. 1801 Fifth Ave., at a.m. Sunday. Mercy's first New Yeor's ar- rival was a daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. John Morrow of 101 Eu- clid Ave. at 2.12 p.m. The father is a city policeman. The last New Year's day baby, also at Mercy, was a girl born nt p m. to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hanna, 401 Glen Ave. Russian Embassy Burns In Ottawa Conflicting Reports By Officials, Firemen OTTAWA six-hour fire Sun- trr than they were this fall." Case day night detroyed the Russian said. i Embassy, lip and other inleres-ted Rcpubli-j City officials out of The Tlcvndan eovornmenl has objected al'o lo a remiiroment that contracts for work on the rl.im be let on the basis of compe- titive I World Bank rules are snid to rooi'ire comnctitive Irddinr in j ll but Vio'ievo Hip (iiffieiillies on this point can j bp negotiated. can's, as well as some Democrats, have predicted that some sort of soil hank program will be enacted tint! year. Benson has indicated support for such a program. The idea is to provide a special Treasury subsidy to farmers who take land out of crops now surpluses and plant grass or odicr fertility-building crops. said the got control hrcaiii." embassy personnel at first obstructed fire- men tr> uig story brick Embassy to enter the three- building. officials voiced com- VA Takes Issue With Proposals Disputes Hoover Recommendations WASHINGTON The Veter- ans Administration has taken is. sue with three of the Hoover Commission's major recommen- dations for changes in its opera- tions. In a statement sent to the House Veterans Affairs Commit- tee, the VA Sunday disputed these proposals from the commis- sion on government reorganiza- tion headed by former President Herbert Hoover; 1. That it consider closing 19 hospitals and abandon plans to build two new ones, at Washing- ton, DC. 2. That its GI life insurance be reorganized to p.iy ts own way. 3. That it check the financial status of who get free for non-sprvice- Roulette Wheels, Crap Games Out At Royal Nevada plamts from thc sidelines as more than 100 firemen fought thc flames. The Russians said the equipment was inadequate, the firefighters slow and hose direc- tion poor. Entrance Difficulties But Mayor Charlotte Whitton. who was called to the scene when Fire Chief John Foote reported dif- ficulties m getting JTito the build- Stamoede Kills 124 In Japan Worshipers Panic At Shinto Shrine Japan (.T) Mourn- ing relatives ranged among neat rows of hooded bodies to claim loved ones Monday as authorities counted 124 dead in the wake of a wild stampede that brought n tragic end to a New Year's Day worship. Thirty six other persons were injured, eight of them seriously, when thousands of worshipers panicked at the lyabiko Shinto shrine Sunday five minutes af- ter throbing drums and pealing bells heralded the arrival of a new year. Some persons were as- the open air shrine to greet the new year with thanks to their gods for good crops and good fortune during the past year when the disaster struck. Throw Rice Cakes It came when robed Shinto priesls, standing atop special tow- ers flanking a 15 step stairway, throwing out pounded rice cakes the traditional symbol for good luck. The solemn rite became a wild stampede as the worshipers crashed over one another in a frantic scramble to grab a cake. Panic flared as screams of terror and agony rent the cold midnight air. A stone fence surrounding a broad platform on which to of the worshipers had assembled crumbled and fell. Many of the worshipers, pushed off the platform, fell screaming to the ground. Others fell atop them. Nngafa is B coastal city of some 220.000 some 160 miles northeast of Tokyo. connected disabilities. Readily Available The VA said it must operate Hospitals m many sections of the country .so their .services can be readily available to veterans And it argued that the two pro- jcvtrd institutions "are located in arr-as of largo pal lent demand." As for GI insurance, the VA said the law which set up this program requires that the gov- ernment bear all administrative Achon by Congress to this likely would he void- ed by the Supreme Coui't as a chang ng. said. "They wore impeded in getting, their equipment in We would! violation of the "contract" be- T.AS VEGAS. Ncv. havc had it under control." jtueen pobeyholders and the gov- Sudan Embanks On Indeoendent Course TOIARTOUM. Sudan JP The Sudan was embarked on its course j sjmv_ hotel as a new independent nation M m- (his d iy after nearly 57 years of joml Un rule by Britain and Ksypt. I jli: A clieerinq Parliament Sunday j th heard Premier Ismail El Azhan read tho prwla ma lions announc- ing recognition of the in- flependence by its Fourier rulers Thousands of othei Sudanese lined thc cti-eetc to hail: Nevadt Intel is operating at Vital! A. Loginov, embassy the height of the holiday season phargp d'affaires, estimated dam without benefit of rasino. at S25 000. No Injunps were The .stopped the I rr.pnrted roiilPttp wheels nnd crap gampsj Officials of the Foreign night nnd inoperative Saturday remained spokesman drastic step employes, to ca .started helpinp and chips. Department called scene to advise how far the dip- lomatic irnniumtv claimed by the Russians could go Onp of several conflicting re- ports on the initial reception firemen was a Soviet official struck Firo Chief. Foote as he en- embassy I he for condominium. In concluded Feb 12, and Kgypt laid out a schedule Sudanese self-determination A temporary Constitution was approved by Parliament Saturday to svrvp until a constitut-nt bl v can draw up a permanent ch.irtpr A five-man commission sworn in to Like over thp Pi nnr general's duties Thr Sudan's population is nine milljon and it is a 967.500 square- j mile country of rotton, drsert and junglr. Outposts Open Fire .TF.RUSALFM, Israeli Sector T outposts in thp slnp firp on Israeli patrol arros5 thp border Monday shortly after two Egyptian Vampire jets flew over eh tern t ory in t N'egev, an Israeli mi'- i t a rv spokesm an a n n ou n red I IP sa.d the pntro) KV suffprrd no and did not return fire. told n reporter hou PV that fuemen admitted In top office wfiere hr s.nd and her family are rntprlnming in a short circuit .started tnr fur the crown room I right after they arrived But th-1' seemed more ladders up The 2.iO-room hotel, onp of the most lavish on the famed Las Ve-'tered the strip is filled holiday Kirrnipn Is who have been forcpd IT do elseu here Anna Mann thp premier following the parlia mentary session. i The British and had Hotnl piihlinty director Morry I firemen, ho said, iointlv nilod the Sudan a Bmdsky said the future of the five' concerned with ge'tt n agreement i hotel, opened lasl on the first. Britain April 10. is uncertain It has bwi i While fnvmen set up their lad-1 be-ot bv financial difficulties for drrs and began pouring water on (.me die roof, embassy officials said Ihp Kitc.sl trouble scurried in nnd out carrying was touched off when the cuhnarv i nients were taken to an cnvj worktMN union sei-ved n writ ofjb.issy officp three blocks -itlachnieni for in II from the same mansion (Kiinis added that the holel that former Soviet Cipher Clerk- paid (he although contend-j Igor slipped out m IflH mg i( was not due until Jan ernmenl, it said Checks Not Justified The VA said, loo. that ils stud- have shown few vpterans oii- tain free hospitahxalion by falsp- lv stating they can't afford pri- vate hospital cai e It con I ended the peieentage is so small that m 'i si; checks would not be jus- tifipri Some lesser commission pro- posals won VA approval. 'Die ngcncv took no .stand on some others. Red Cross Boosts Relief Estimates SAN FRANCISCO 1? A lijjhl rain, the final trace of n not her big Pacific .stoi-m that thiealencrl to lash flood-battered norlhein Cal- ifornia with gnlp winds and heavy downpours, fell over wide j-octions of flooded regions Monday. the storm it.self broke up at Ihp thousands of flood victims to the new ypar with a rnonumenla] cleanup unhampered by new flooding. Meanwhile, thr American Reel Cross boosted il.s estimale.s on it must spend for relief anil rehabilitation in northern Califor- nia and southern Oregon to "up- wards of seven million dollars." The original e'-'tirnale was mil lion dollars. Fled Cioss resident Kll.sworlh P.u.iker "hotween and families nnd small business will require Rrd aid in thn disfiMrr areas Thr bodies of brothers wvre found Sunday .south of Yuba Citv north central California h-: ni'j; center and one of tlvv ifH- areas. Their drains} mcre.isT-d 30 thr- toll in .Sultei f'ou.ity and bofslfd California's to t-il to New Year Opens Two Governors To Discuss Promotion Of Meat Products Plans for the aM-out promotion of meat products will be discuss-! pd at a meeting between Iowa j Gov. I co A. Hoogh and Nebraska j Gov, Victor Anderson. The meelinq is scheduled for Wednesday in Omaha, A number of Iowa and Nebraska farmers, farm leaders, ranchers and oth- ers interested in the meat indus- try have been invited to attend. An Iowa Farm Products Com- mittee was established by Gov. Hocgh lecently. Thus committee hns boon seeking wnys and means of stimulating the sales of f. products generally, and those from Iowa farms in Gov. Anderson also has shown interest in the promotion of farm products. The meeting likely will be an effort to correlate the ef- forts of thp two states, pnHirular- ly with respect to increasing th? sale of meal. On Exfro Holiday Squirrels Play Tag, But Little Other Activity Here Rousing Turnout Of French Voters An Unusually Large Number Of Woftien PARIS Ficnch voters, in- cluding an unusually large turn out of women, gathered around ling places Monday as France elected its third National Assem- bly since the World War II libera- tion. The weather ranged from .scat- .ered .sunshine in the south ;loomy skivs in I he north and snow i thc mounlainou.s Jura district of Premier Edjjar Faure, but no- whero did il the voters. In Jura sntnvplows were out on he roads early ffnd in .some cases voters arrived on .sins. Despite rousing campaign of stable government, and iclion to hold other chunks of UTP empire, political observers saw liltle e'harxT1 thc new A.'sern- ily will be rnurh diffeient from ie old 1! Seats At Sdikr There were iiM seat.s a I stake n continental France and a record ,'iOO Candida les afhT them also was n record number >f rhgible GS8. Vol prs in oversea s a reas na m n >0 deputies lorlay. Twn othw.s, one New Caledonia rind one fiom ie Society I.sl.md.s in Ihv Pacific, vill be elected laler this month. In Algeria, where 30 deputies: normally would he elected, voting: va.s postponed imMinilelv because! a tcrionsl campaign by na-l lon.-ilist extremists Despilc the of sur- what most political ob-serv- rs uas an Assembly even more ami uncnn Irollable than the la si one ilh MO group rltiirning a nuiionly, .inv calimet must he priced liter from half a different parlies. Til" ,inlhvmr-tir of Hem h politics makes il mi'vit.ible thai handsful of deputies will their ft I It-mpoi .ti ilv lo one lead er or ftnolhf r. dept on lh( .sjrt'cific is.suc' lo be decided. The rampant) Hevr loper] inlo n 1 Premier Fid ir Fain f-'s i of renter co i lit ion u Inch ex IK fed to off eon- If s Ihan Hear major Mild Readings Continue Here (Hj Tli.- Atonal, d I'K-ts) Eiylil persons were killed in Iowa highway accidents Sunday, stariins the motor vehicle toll on a fast climb on the first day of the new year. Only one traffic death occurred in Iowa on Jan. 1, 1955. No highway fatalities were reported during the last 30 hours of 1955 and last year's toll as kept by the Associat- ed Press was 628, five few- er than the record of 1954. Stale safety officials had pre- dicted that five persons would .be killed over the three-day weekend holiday which officially ends at midnight Monday. A ffithpr and son died in a head- on collision late Sunday. Two teen- afie girls wprp killed in another Crash. The four other deaths re- sulted from separate accidents. IJst Victims The dead were: John E. Zimmerman, 22, Rock- well City, apparently the first traf- fic fatality of 1956. Mrs. Mrrlin Lehwald, 17, Audu- hon. Henry .T. Zcherny, 25, Amana. Janet Thompson, Ifi, Wyoming. Mary Karen Paulson, 16, Scotch Grove. Imi'e Werneburg, -11, Sioux City. Ronald Werneburg. 14, son ol Mrs. Jamea Allen, Duluth, Minn. Hmcl On Cnlllsiion Werneburg and his son were killed and eight other persons, in- jured in a head-on collision of Jfwo cars on Highway 20 just east of Correctionville, about p.m. AuthoriUes.suid a woman driver of a third auto escaped injury when it overturned in an attempt to avoid hitting the wrecked caps- Wernehurg and his son, a fijfeh- man at. High School 1.1 Sioux City, both died shortly after arrival at a Sioux City hospital. The Some Iowa Points Get Touch Of Winter Mild air, pushing oast ward from thc RoL'ky Mountains, is keeping the Icx-al weather pallem at standstill. And no change is likely through Tuesday, at least. Clear and cold weather is fore- cast Monday night, with a low in the mid 20's predicted. Cloudy skies and temperatures in tho high are in sight Tuesday. Thr cloudy, hut dry and mild weather is slated for the re.st of thc> stale, too. But somp parts o( Iowa had touch of winter over the weekend as a low pressure disturbance brought snow, rain and .sleet to northern communities Sunday and Monday rnornincf. Some IHghwayit Icy Precipitation totals Sunday in- cluded Mason City, .14 of an inch; DCS .05; Otumwa. 07; nurlinpton, .04; Sioux City arid Spencer, .02; and Davenport, 05, Monday morning, light snow was falling at Mason City and Spenc- er, freezing rain at Dubuque, and I ight rai n at Burl ington. I leavy fog was reported at Cedar Tlapids, LamoTii, De.s Mnines and Waterloo. Don't Score Here! (For Council Bluffa to date) ith documents tliat led fo Hie baring of a Russian espionage ring in Canada. i Mummers' Parade Welcomes New Year PTirLADFn.PHIA Philadel- phia's 12 000 mummer'; put their 1 Young Omahan Killed OMAHA T.ylr T, NYKmi. 20, u killed early Mondav his rnr failed fo q turn on I rail ard hit a traffic light. Monday a good day: Foi lit i IP to base then doun thp then- toaster For bifmn squinels to plav lav; itb bl.ick .sqiiirrt-Ls in bss Park. For h engines to box- cars acioss stiPPt.s without blfek- ing much traffic. And for workers to lie late in bed and laugh at their alarm clrvks. There wasn't anything attrac- tive pnotigh about this morning to draw people outdoors. Waiting For Grid Games Most mpn were using the extri rest up from New Yp-a r ce lehra t ions. 12 000 mummers feet thp pavement of Flroad Stropl Monday in thpir annual spec- holiday to tarular stnit wr-lraming thp new They lolled around living rooms Thp marrhfTT facM v.eathrr -waiting for A full aflr-rnoon forecast of rloudv skies and fern- football in "hirh they uo'iM in the for fo-ir from ilieir OVPI stuffed miles of and slrnr and radio musir m and prams kwtded with i (heavy .Kamps. I About the oniy earnest outside activity thai could tie found h.ilf a men sinking slabs of n id'i I lo for in a ary darn on Mosquito Creek, It divcit Hie v. aler aioiind the site set foi a peimancnt dam, wbu h uill hr- [iail of a p'Oject to kfep Lake Man.'iua filled. County Schools In Session Hr-rp and there n filling station was open. Traffic in cafes was light, and most of the rolls were Irff-ovfM from Saturday. One man in the part of Council niuffs had thr to do a lit- tle tinkeung on his car. Centra! and other county schools werp in session. City srhooK ucrp waiting rxpcrtantly for fo start Tuesday and Wednesday. 11 f n I r veryone rrpf hospital ndendnnts, rren fireman the of utility and moth ors a day oi rest. Highway conditions in the north- ern part of the slate were classed by the Highway Patrol a.s 100 per cenl ice coveted to .slippery in .spots Iligli lernperaliues New Year's Day varied from 'JO at SpeniN'r and Sioux City to 50 at Burlington, Lows during tho night rangpd fiom 15 at Sioux City to 35 at Davenport. Trace Of Precipitation Council Bluffs readings Sunday climbed fj-om an parly morning low of 29 to a high of '111. A trace if precipitation was recorded. Monday's weather here clnii- dv nnd mild, with n in Ihp nid 40'.s. The morning low was !2 A cold wavp gripped the nnth- Mst parl of the nation Monday. The frigid blast dropped temper- ilures to 1fi below yero in New York Slate. The cold fiir spread HS far .south ,-is central Tennessee and parts of Virginia. Snow fell in parts of Indiana Wiscnns-in, flMnois and .southern Minnesota. (jpiieifilly fair weather covered (he rest of the nation nil hough iiids of black du.sl, piopellrd by 50-mile an hour winds, swirled weslorn and central Cali- fornia. Weather Too Mild For Ice Skating Mild vuathcr i.s playing a dirty I rick on I he kids who leceived ice skales for Christmas. John ('hri si e risen, Mipprintpfifipnt of paik.s in Council Bluffs, .said the lernpfratures of the past f  Men France s left of u mm u ill he fl nn% well fo ppf a third of the seals The Communists Thrv weir to increase iheir ,ib >iit o.if fifth in (lie A.s-em v IHT.HJM- Ihp fuliiii. of other iM niip1- to uniic nn-it th-.-ni tin St tirnf A battled tiolh qu F.uire and f-'rance, bre.ik vr up manv of then- sup p-jrleis, but its voting ua1 a subie'-l of drb.it of uere port the idea.s of Pierre P JiijatU leader of n movement of .sma merrhanK in an anti Robeson Will Visit Soviet 'Very Soon' .vhi :il VIM! fhc s Aivi The MIIJUT Ivi denied ;i p hv thp T S Us Sl.ilr tnicnt lo IrVKr-l ahrnnd in Mip Hut u'cfkiy tn Iitfniry. and iniurcd Included Wcrnc- burg's wire, 3-1. and a daughter. Karen. 11. Both were reported in fair condition. Also injured were Raymond Kris. 35, Wall Lake fanner, rr poricd in fair condition; Ins '12, in critical condition; two KoK children. Terry, 9, and Dennis, -1. bolh in fair condition, and the (her and mother of Keis, Mr. nnd Mrs. Frpbcrt Kpis of Lake View. Keis is hh wife 60. Authorities said thc collision oc- curred on a curve made slippery by snow. Iiitrrvctloii Crush Mrs. Allen was fatally iniurcd late Sunday in thp collision of two "ar.s at Ihp interaction of High- ways 30 and 82, ahout 22 miles west of Cedar Rapids. She was dead on arrival at a 'edar Rapids hospital of injunes uffered when thc car her husbnnrt was dnvinj; was struck broadside h.y another auto. In thp other car wprp Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Peters of ullpr. Allpn and thp Peters cou- WTTP at Odar Rapids with injunes not believed serious. Authorities said Allen .had stopped at the intersection and wai pulling onto Highway 30 when his car was struck by the Peters auto. Miv, Thompson and Miss Paul- sen were killed in a two-car acci- dent about 2 p rn nn Highway W, four miles wevt of Wyoming llurli'd 100 l''ppt Authorities the car in which Kills WPIC pulled onto the highway from a side road, was struck by an easthound auto and hurled 100 feet by the impact The Kills were thrown out of the car. Tuo U'yommj; youths in the car with the Rirls. flu-hard AlcOalmam and Donald injured. McC'alrnanl was taken to Uni- wisily Hospitals at I'nva City and r.nt r.nslen.K'n to ids hospital Bolh urre reported m c'luifhhon uas killed .sllndav uhen hi.s auto failed to makp s turn nn Highway 271. a half mile east of Alkms in Renlon Counly Hi's hiylv uas found ,it 9 am. hy a f.irmer living ne.irln. (lie t Exira Accident i ii1 .Mrs l.ehv ild u.is killi d .it -I u.ts am uhen Ihe cir in uhuh she uill li.ivelui1; alone uenl out of nl" conliol and lnl t i rel-- Inn! e abutment on "I tuo milei nnrtii of Kvr.i. Mrs. fnulid fret from the demolished car survived h.v husband campaign .'is not he put p saying f i om N'e candida'e matters quoted him as and a --veir-old a telephone interview I Zimmerman died m York Oodgr hospital at 2 a m Fort foruard Omaha Livestock Day OMAHA Mavor John Rosen- blatt has proclaimed Jan. 19 ns Omaha T.ix'esfofk A celefn nf ton nnd bar.riuef ill honor those u ho br'pcd rf i1- IT market m WS> U-inp j for the oKservanc.fi. NEWSPAPER! "Tell your readers they undoiiht- mmules after his anival there. HP fdlv he.ir me in peiM.n ill injured eirher w h r n Ine net, future 1 hnpe tne ques the ear in u Inch he uas ndul2: uent -ton or mv visii uill he decided control and into a ditcli on m a matter of 'JO ,ih itit 1.1 miles south- and Hint I will he of Fort able to visit the countries of the democracies' Mobeson. uho the T'nion in 10'W and I'M1) and hid in m-mvl f lo ha.id it to mm uas quoterl as I r 'he Sonet I'nio.i very mitrli I i Jrwwl, yoiir real Jriemi." 01 me Sm l Toda y s Ch uckie V (ho Otli tit. got lo lin.id it Inrrnir Tax proplo i Ihpy'll come after NEWSPAPER!   

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