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Council Bluffs Iowa Nonpareil: Friday, June 2, 1944 - Page 20

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   Council Bluffs Iowa Nonpareil (Newspaper) - June 2, 1944, Council Bluffs, Iowa                               PAGE TWENTY. May Collection of Taxes Higher Totals This Year Totals May tax collections totaled 449 of which were regu lar taxes and were delin qucnt taxes, according' to figure compiled Friday by County Troas urer J. Martin Potcrscn. In 1943 tho May collections wer for regular taxes an for delinquent taxes. Collections during the first flv months of tho current year totale for regular taxe compared to for th same period of 1043 Delinquent taxes collected dur Ing the first flvo months of th current year totaled compared to for th name period last year. Following is the monthly collec tions comparatively of tho tw years: REGULAR TAXES. 1944 1943 07 COUNCIL BLUFFS   NONPAREIL-JUNE 2, 1944. Jan. Feb. March April May 128 921.9 0 Totals DELINQUENT TAXES 1944 1944 S 7.844.0C March April May Totals Your Tin Madden's Letter Comes After Death Deputy Municipal Court Clerk Frank Stemler received Frltla' what IH believed to bo among thi letters written by 2nd Lt. Jer ry A. Mndclcn, who dlej May ]J of wounds received in action in the Italian war zone. Lt. Madden, who was clerk of tho court and on leave of absence while serving in tho armed forces, wrote the letter on May 6 and It waa mailed on May 9, In the letter Lt. Madden snlcl When he arrived In "sunny Italy' it rained most of tho time, creating mud knee deep, but later the weather became very pleasant, "I am now perched on tho top of a mountain in tho front ho wrote. "Now It Is Jlko a day In tho country at homo But ever so frequently tho quiet la jarringly broken by artillery flro Most of tho tlmo that artillery Is our guns firing but now and then the shells como In too." He mentioned receiving The Nonpareil, although a month anil a half old In arriving, "but It Is welcome." Tour Tin A. L. Will Hold Graduation Friday Graduation exorcises for the 1944 graduating class of Abraham Lin- coln high school will take place Friday night at 8 o'clock In the city auditorium, Tho traditional processional, with tho girls dressed In white mals and carrying red roses and tho boys in dark suits with tarna- tion boutonnlcr.1, will start the reremony. Thirteen of the gradu- ates have boon selected to present the program, the subject of which Is "A VVoi Id to Live In A suit- able symbol has been designed by the Industrial arts and the art de- partments to show tho nearness of our neighbors in tho post-war world, taking Into consideration the development of the airplane and other mrans of communication. Principal O. W. Kirn will pre- sent thr class to Thomas McMlllen, who will present tho diplomas. Dr. C. L. Crawford, city super- intendent of schools, will preside. Your Tin Swimming Class for Beginners The Pottiiwuttnmlc county chap- ter of the American Red Cross Is sponsoring R beginners swimming class at tho Railroad Y.M C.A., be- ginning at 7 p. m. and to be held weekly, it was announced. Stu- dents may enroll Friday night or next Friday Students oanylng memberships In tho Y.MC.A., will bo permitted use of tho pool fiw of charge and non-members will bo required to make a small payment for tho use of the pool, it 'vas announced. The class will cover a ten weeks period of Instruction in swimming. Viur Tin Two Burned When Steamer Explodes Two pel sons buiiiiHl Fiulay Vvlit'ii u gasoline waUl steamer bo- i ins used foi lomuviiig wallpaper exploded at thi1 home of Mis. I! R Jarktion, 328 Lincoln avenue. Mrs. Jackson, 62, was burned nbout the face and suffered an nnklo injury when sho wns blown back through the hall doorway, Dan Peterson. 48. 508 Hnael street, who wits opciatuij; the steamer, was burned on both hands, cars and hack of the neok. Both were given first aid by the emf-gency unit Mrs Jackson le- mained at home Peterson wag taken to Mercy hospital. Woodwork In tho front room blistered and the top of a daven- port m tin ruljninini; room was son led tlu tlic th.it lol- loufrt the NEWS PA PER fl R C H1V Beef Point Values for June BEEF STEAKS' Pwtithoute. Club Rib MnelKut....... SlrWn.........._____ Slrlom-tOMkis...... Round (full Round....... Bottom Bound------------ Round Chuck (blidt or Flirt_____............ ROASTS' 10-Inch (ul (ehlM bom on) Rlb-iUndmj (chlni bout on) 7-Inch euL _________ _.. Round lit _____ Bump-bond In Hump-bomliis Chuck (blide or In..... si Shouldjr-boiuliJS...... 1 liKMn only (bit a M, B, ni C CiHn (utludlni jlqi lot Mute Dtrlb 12 12 12 8 9 11 13 13 13 13 13 St ot 8 11 7 11 Si- 6t 3r Und Iht point o( an lUm of ilMMti Iri bocn and JU ahMM moup above. Follow Ih. m ih, of Ural ehMM moup la Ih. column which InoludM woigKt of ItU Item. That f? Mlu not only does no one know if there will be a pipeline but no one can say who will pay for it. A reporter asked the president if his remark meant that the oil pipe- lino situation had gone backward. The president replied only that conferences between this country and Great Britain on the near east' orn oil situation are still going Yom Thi Kubby Is Republican; Was Incorrectly Listed In an article in yesterday's Non- pareil, it was referred to Ben E. Kubby, republican candidate for county attorney, as the democratic candidate, Mr. Kubby is the re- publican candidate and has always a republican" Your Tin Is to have a now, tully modernized fire truck, equipped for service in town and country, It will be larger than the present truck. Dr, R. G. Moorp has been named as chair- man for Dunlap for the fifth war loan drive, The Rainbow Girls will have Initiation and installation at Hho Masonic hall Friday eve- ning, Mrs Sprechcr, supreme ad- visor for tho .state of Iowa, and officers from the Denison chapter will be In charge. Al Goeb- lisch of Norfolk, has pur- chased tho Vet a Noidakor home and is moving to Dunlap this week. TUUHMAN Everett Surface, S of Great Lakes, spent the past week with his wife and two daughters and his patents, Mr and Mrs. C. W. Surface. Lt. Jo- seph Wight, who had spent the past month with his mother, Mrs. Nettie Wight, left Friday for ver, Col. Ernest Wilson of Sidney purchased the meat mar- ket and .grocery store of S. L. Sur- face and has taken possession. Mr. Surface has been in business for .the last 31 years, first in the res- taurant, then meat market and later the grocery and market com- bined. Mr. Wilson has been em- ployed in the Hummel grocery store in Sidney the last 16 years. Elder P. M. Hanson of the L. D. S. church has been in Wood- bine this week .attending a meet- ing of the reunion committed of the Northwest Iowa district, to plan the reunion to be held at Woodbine In August. Mrs. Bert Gray, Norma and Ruth Gray, Mrs. Gladys Wright, Mrs, Harry Pow- les, Mrs. Irene Stafford, Elolse Mo Alexander, Ruth Davison, Norma Van Scyoc, Lennis Gearhart and Phyllis Langston are now employ ed in the Jerpe Cold Storage com- pany, Malvern, and drive back and forth each day. The B. R. B. club met Thursday with Mrs. Mar inda Maxwell. Bridge was played. B. A. Johnston of Hol- ton, Kan., Is spending the week with her sister, Miss Myrtle Wood- rum. Mrs. Hoyt Lundy and daughters of Knoxville have been guests this week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Lundy. Mrs, June Boyd accompanied them lome Friday for a visit and will also visit at Winterset. Glen Ranck, who is in training at Great Lakes, has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Duke Ranck, Milton, Jerry and Maurice McCartney and their families, Mrs, Nellie Herker, C. R. McCartney and several other relatives from Omaha and Hamburg attended a reunion Sunday at the home of Hr. and Mrs. Clark Rogers near Percival. Guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs, Frank King were Mrs. Ruby Leonard of Omaha, Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Detleff and Mrs. Johann Detleff of Glenwood, and John Asmas of Tabor. The Primitive Baptist services were leld Sunday at the church at   ad operated hero for a number o ears. Will Mackay, who has cen taking treatment in an Oma a hospital, has returned home Mrs. Willard Haning has re urneH home from the St. Mary's ospltal 1n Nebraska City. rs. Leonard Sederberg and three hilclren of Winslow, Ariz., will ar vo hero June 5 for a visit with er parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hilton nd other relatives Geralc ox has gone to the home of his ster, Mrs. Mason Strawbaoker Oakville, where ho will asslsl s brotlipr-in-law on the farm. Mrs. Minnie Depke of Now THE OLD JUDGE SAYS... "I can't think of anything else you'll need for your Victory garden, Judge... you've got pretty nearly everything I think so, too, John. Ever get your asparagus patch "I gave that up last year, Judge. Tried it six years in a row with no luck. Just haven't got the right soil, I "Well, I think you're wise, John...no use keeping on trying things you know won't work. Just like prohibition. State-wide pro- hibition has been tried in this country seventy-two times in the last ninety years. It has been adopted forty-seven times in the past thirty-three years and discarded everywhere except in three states. Same thing was tried in eight provinces in Canada and in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia but it was an admitted failure and universally abandoned. "The reason is prohibition does not prohibit. All you get is bootleg liquor in- stead of legal liquor, plus no end of crime and corruption." TWj ulitrliumml iffmsmd (.'mliunci cf AkMic Bartcsi liutuilnri. Inc. Virginia is visiting Mr. and Mrs R. F. Bickett. Mrs. William Talcott and son, Phillip have gone to St, Louis to join her husband, who is in defense work there. Gwen Eyan Is visiting her siiter, Mrs. Ruth Record in Omaha. Mrs. Frank Dowell of Kansas City is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Manrose. RFVEBTON Mrs. Bell Kittrell and Mrs. Gladys Wade both have received cablegrams from Cpl. George Skidmore. Cpl. Skldmore is Mrs. Kittrell's son and a brother of Mrs. Wade. He Is now over- Cupp had as dinner guests on Sun- day, Miss Dorothy Bright of River- day, Miss Dorothy Bright of River- ton, Sandra Bright of Shenandoah, and James Gray of Elwood, Ind. Tho Henry Alstrand and Douglas Alstrand families from Omaha spent part of the week with Mrs. Emma Smith and son, Glenn. Mr. and Mrs. Al Wellenselck from Cook, Neb., spent Sunday at the country home of Henry Sipe and helped him observe his birth- day. Dr. Ralph Lovelady and wife of Sidney visited Tuesday at the Mrs, Fannie Smith home. Llndvall was elected secretary and Wllla DeWitt, treasurer of the local Girl Scout troops at a meeting held at the Cocklln fish farm, A daughter was born May 22 at the Murphy Memorial hospital in Red Oak to Mr. and Mrs. Warren Knel- sel. Mrs. J, J. Donahoe who has been a patient for several months in a Council Bluffs nursing home has been brought to her home Is Gritwold. S. C. Wag- ler returned home from Des Molnea this week where had attended the annual meeting of-Funeral Di- rectors and Embalmers aMoclatlon, Officers elected at a meeting of the Welrlch Cemetery associa- tion follow: Calvin Lindeman, pres- ident; P. H. Martens, vice-pres- ident; Mrs. Carl Dunmler, treas- urer. SILVER Rommel has entered the hospital at Mober- ley, Mo., for observation and treat- ment. Mrs. Charles Krute and sons, Joe Kruse and Ed Kruse, attended funeral services of a rela- tive, Louis Peterson, at Omaha. Now Chris Is a Deputy Sheriff The board of supervisors Thurs- day afternoon approved the bond for City Ppundmaster Chris Chrtstensen, named a special dep- uty sheriff without compensation. The action is to cloak the city poundmaster with authority In picking up dogs in Pottawattamle county, outside of Council Bluffs, on assignment by the county. Because June S Is primary elec- tion, the board voted to hold its regular business meeting on June 6. Your Tin The average American wastes the equivalent of two cakes of soap a year. Your Tin Cini Brazil is sending young farmers to the U. S, to study American agricultural methods. A. L Students Buy in Bonds Abraham Lincoln high school students accounted for the pur- chase of worth 'of war bonds and stamps during the sem- ester just closed, according to an announcement by Mrs. Agnes White, Junior Red Cross sponsor at at the school. Although this was a short week, due to the fact that Decoration day and Friday afternoon -were holi- days, students purchased worth of bonds and stamps. The school has approached very near the goal of a quarter of a million dollars in sales since Dec. 7, 1942, having sold in the government securities. Among one of the most outstand- ing achievements in the school's campaign, sponsored by the JRC and The Echoes, the student week- ly newspaper, was the sale of a bond or stamp to every atudimt in the school each week for the; last eight weeks. This has entitled the school to fly tho United States treasury flag. Your Tin Dtnits Pttition Special to Tho Nonpareil, an order return- ed following a hearing Is district court Judge Charles Roe of Coun- cil Bluffs denied the petition brought by Roy Curry, Edith Nel- son, Agnes Stemler, and Lucille Brewer for removal of Wray Wil- son, Massena Banker as executor of the estate of John L. Curry, late Massena resident. The oourt construed the will and Itttd that certain specific and de- vises were mace and that then were no general devises or bequests and that there was an Insufficient amount of pcrsonnal property to pay the debts against the estate. Ywr Tta Cm To Plan lond Drivo Special to The Nonpareil, for putting Cass county over the top in the fifth war loan drive which opens June 12, will be made at a meet- Ing of all chairman and solicitors, called by Attorney E. S. Holton, county war bond chairman, for Saturday eevnlng at the city hall auditorium. Mr. Holton Is asking town and township chairmen to name women as their assistants, as men are busy In farm and Indus- trial work. The county quota It Tin The more thoroughly plates are scraped the easier the dish washing Job will be, requiring less soap and water. Ymr Tin To prevent water-logging, don't hull strawberries until after they .have been washed. IS IWUMY MNIHTDT WHAT CAUSES ITT A booklet containing oplnloni ol novi dcctofi en Hill will itftl mi, Hwy tail, nedar writing lo Mvcallwml DMilan, COIL SPRINGS INCLUDED With Earh of These BEDROOM SUITES! BUY ON EASY TERMS! Here are Top values in fine bedroom suites. Not just one or two styles but many open to your choice. We have selected these three outstanding suites and are offering them for Saturday with spring: and mattress at one cost. BUY MORE WAR BONDS! Conventional Style Lots of Beauty in This Quality Bedroom A beautiful suite in rich walnut veneers. Includes bed, chest and J A 95 vanity with spring, and mattress. 149 Pay Wttkty MATTRESS AND COIL SPRING INCLUDED Buy War Bonds Modern Styling Stunning Suite a Favorite Throughout the Country Big plate mirrors, in the very popular limed oak. You receive the bed, chest, vanity, the coil spring and mattresH. Pay S2.2I Wttlily MATTMSS AND COIL SMINft INCLUDID very popular W Period Design Rich and Distinctive in Appearance! 3 Pieces An 18th Century Suite we are proud to of- fer. In walntft veneers and fft OR other fine woods. Bed, Chest, Vanity or Dresser. IV Pay Wctkfy MATTRISS AND COIL SPRING INCLUDID CAN TAKE UP TO 12 MONTHS TO PAY! NFWSFAPF.Rl   

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