Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Republican Newspaper Archive: September 22, 1912 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Republican

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Republican (Newspaper) - September 22, 1912, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER: 22, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. NO. 170. County Central CpaPiitte'e Settles Diff- Ambers Pledged to the Whole Republican Ticket IEPERSIA BE1WEEN JIM .VXD RUSSIA PBACTIC- ALLV AGKKE TO SHARE BVTEX- LY IX ENGLISH AIBMAN FALLS TO DEATH j J. D. ASTJJSY MOST SKILLFUL AXD IVTREPID OP EX6LISH AV1A- i TOKS TOLLED. HOLD CONFEBESCE E. Moore .Expresses Views on Duty Republican Candidates to be Loyal to the Pointedly :toCdngressman Good. v _' _, __... Imrtemd of the republican central committee holding: their meeting; yesterday each committeeman with fe4u.'f. brick in Ms-pocket and .Chair- teao Allle presiding with" a. 1 barreled shotgun on the desk It wu a. nice little Jove feast Just one of those old fashioned republi- can .attalri, -where harmony, m-o-ri-e- y- -was the watchword and 'Over it all there" was the sweet dove of peace in' persons, E. R. Moore and -R. O. Stewart and William Sleele who never agreed before in "their life Just cooed to -each other for all. the world like pair of lovers on a pretty moonlight night. For. thanks to the clever engineer- ins of Mr. Moore, thanks to the work of the .Linn county .candidates, out of all tbe tumult and discussion" of presidential candidates "Ism" _ jtieortes'.and all -the rest there came forth, a resolution adopted unani- Jnpusly endorsing everything- republi- can- from constable to president aria get out and "tooat" Tor evwythinj: -that la -I-. believe Is not a mimber of .this committee who knows just he stands unless it is hie political' manager. I where a 'man is. a candidate on a ticket he should1 not ask the support of every other 'man" on that ticket, unions he Intends to: support it Ko man can be a. member of- the county central com- mittee and be. a. member of any other -partj-. I believe It would be proper to ask" every man to exert his best efforts for the success of the re- publican ticket and he should not stay on the committee unless he can do this and' he should pledge himself to not be a member of any other Mr. Spangler die not like this refer- ence'to Mr.'.Good. He tried to Inter- republican.' If he does well -a certain- resolution adopt- .which will make his punishment .-.mire and certain as death and poll'1 -and there you .are: First, as "usual; it was necessary .to feed the. After that there were a few speeches which almost resulted' in- between Mr. Moore 'and Attorney Spangler. Hut they, adjourned, committee- to Kim ball building1, and the candidates, "to- a nearby room and they. -talked it over. candidates 'for county offices "hare -not Just exactly enjoyed this threatened break. In the republican- of; Linn county. Several days -ago they derided "that it was rieces- l-iary'to come -to some sort ot an.un- 'derstandlng. That if "-their, ambitions "Vwwe'v.to'-'b'e -satisfied this', fall 'they liafl. whiclt- was along tho same lines fin- ishing; "up by saying he did not be- lieve .in. buying a pig in a poke and that he would not-support Mr. Good unless .he stated his position. When he flnlahetl apeahing Mr. Spsngler got the floor. He spoke briefly, .but to the point. .He said, "Mr. Good was working for the re- publican party when the man who just spoke was the leading democrat in the -county. He talks of Mr. Good being, a- coward. You have your tathawates -.thought- .thingJ to b'e sferved --at' noon-7a.t the .afontifbse. It in private 'dlh'lh'g rooru." so.'-'thire; would vVtations guarded.- 'Mere "was not' much noise banquet. no outside influences icould be -brought to "bear. Sheriff G.- Loftus'. presided over the ioeetlhg and made- 'the Introductory I Beeches very brief. As a sort of a" peace "maker, Mr. 'of beiar o'iher ai-thrush.-ther -were Impromptu Gatheriwr. -i.. Some 'of -them- eot. .the banqueti-'.others-. went up- to the republican j In the Klmball building: The.meetinr a trifle -delaiyed awaiting- the arrival of to bilk it over with other's. In the In- terval Mr.; A. it Floyd ef-Lisbon, toolc occasion Invite the Sauer- kraut day at Lisbon next Thursday. Mr. Reed arrived -and called the. meeting" t.o order, Mr." R G. Stewart irot attention and ask- ed .to submit a resolution. There was H. call 'for a reading- of the minutes of the.. last mc-e.tinsr and Mr. Stewart waited. Then followed a roll call and-.it WAS ascertained that thirty-one of- the thirty-nine commliteemen were Cruurn-ipn read a letter from R'. H. Mills of Central CTty. stating that. inasmuch as he could not _T__ the entire reDublican ticket he there 'dissension in-the county j wisheci to resign. 33T. F. Meredith of committee and that there I Central City, -being- the, only nominee of" it who could have j-to''fill the vacancy, was elected by s.c- Ipniatior.. Then the worderful story of it E.'-Moore was.invited in. He made after' County Clerk William Dennis-and Francis Heald, candidate for senator.' had. spoken. Mr. Moore outlined" policies. He said that harmony was necessary.. He .did not speak Ions but it was a speech direct; from the shoulder and that could'.-not be misunderstood; said, lie .believed that Mr. Taft was as. honestly nominated as he. was his predec- years', ago. He said that man -wno- nomMfttaa by a party should rxtand by it. We have can- didate 'for. congressman who is IX 1007 COTJXTBUES SIGX AGREEMENT TO HAVE IS- FLTHEXCE OVER COOi'TRY. BITTERLY OPPOSED Liberal PnpcrB Bowall Disappearance ot Persia BB Great Increase In England London, Sept 21. The practical division of Persia between Great Brit- ain and Russia appears almost assur- ed as a result ot the conferences Sergius Sazonoff, the Hussion foreign minister, has had -with Brit- ish statesmen. All the newspapers are predicting this arrangement. The liberal papers oppose the project bit- terly. Since the signing of the Anglo- Russian convention .of 1907 for the maintainance of Persia's Independ-' Belfast, Sept. J. D. Astley, one of the most intrepid and skillful of English avltors was killed this-af- ternoon by a fall of hlg aeroplane. AsUey and James Valentine, each driving a machine, were making ox- hlbitiori flights in the presence of 1 000. spectators. Astley, after a-splen- did flight, was descending while the people cheered. He attempted to bank too sharply when making a sud- den turn' and; caught by a fluty wind, the monoplane fell like a atone from a height of 100 feet. Astley was flung against one of the .wings and his skull was fractured. He died loon after being taken to the 'hospital. Astley's wife witnessed the flying at j Hendon today. She left the grounds in the best of spirits, not knowing that her husband had been killed.- Moore and hb continued talk been a steady growth of this influence- and accord- Ing to the shrinkage of the Independ- ence in Persia. Some of the liberal papers bewail the disappearance of Persia as the buffer state and foresee a'great in- crease in the British military estab- lishment when the British-Russian boundary Is drawn across the middle of what Is now called' Persia. There is no confirmation here of the reported alliance of the four Balkan states to make common cause against Turkey, but it Is acknowledg- of your opinion of a that a reapproachment exists Whether It Is right that one should." knife another man In the back, he, Is not looking. Mr. Good here; -unfortunately he prewsnt- Mr. Moore has driven s, stil- Good's Just.- 'the'n" they adjourned; perhaps .it" was -.best. It happy had-bcen' a sort atmosph'ere-.and-.thia 'fliial! .Spin'gler Vas.4 thov among MOVEMENT FAILS TO ATTACK AGUA PRIETA WIFE DIDN'T KNOW WILSON" KICKS IS IN STATE FIGHT Making Exiiibition ed to Bak too Sharply and Caught in Fiuky Like Skull at Hospital. PRESIDEXT WHITE PRESIDENT. HAYES SAY XOT TO SETTLE DISPUTE. GAIX COXFIDEXCE OF BY BELXG TRUE TO PKO- GRJESSISM i A CRITICAL JUNCTURE FOB LEOISLATIOiS7 OF, >IEETTVG TO DISCUSS INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE ACT. CALLS GOVERXOK WILSOX CHAXAX. OF PJRESEXT F TRIAL SITtJATIOX. Declares Junies Smith, Jr., is Kcac- Personal Feeling in, Absolutely.Commit- ,__. ted to Progressive Policy. LIARS Jersey City, X. J..-Sept. i Woodrow Wilson proclaimed, tonight j i in a speech on the New Jersey senat- j orial situation "that the ronly condition j H. ____ ...pZatVEBT. THE TJttfTH. NO TROUBLE under which the democratic presiden- j cy can gain the of the na- 4 Pi T> i tlon ia "that It- should have Itself true A. Ju X -L arid absolutely committed to pro- gressive policy." The governor spoke here "and. 'at _ HoboTsen in opposition to -.the candida- of former United States Senator ,That! James Smith, Jr., and on behalf of Willlaan Hughes for the office of united States senator to .be voted on in the state primaries next Tuesday. The governor declared at the outset that It was his -duty as spokesman of _. __ _. _ __ the democratic party in the- state to Charleston, W. Sept. The war'a the .people that James Smith, meeting her? today of "representatives Jr., was not a progressive." but a- reac- NO PKOPEK IAWS More Serious. Iloorisbed ing His AdihliilBtraddii Is BeoMiM Present Dmy Laws "Wouldn't -His BnreAU to, Ccmmd, Kan.. Sept. W11-. son is-the'Buchanan of the preoent In- of the members-of civic bodies of tlonary. He declared -that, it -was no j dustfial TVest Virginia, called by Governor friend "and ;Ito- GlasBcock, to consider the labor sit- j tteid the' same opinions "that he' does." j Goyei-hpr uatlon was without the presence of; the governor would feel obliged to op- "directly inverted ,.the i International President John p, j pose-him. j and said that jits knowledge' at White of the United Mine Workers of never .-been'aware -of any. (the Roosevelt administration w i America. White, with1 Vice President Haves, announced- early- In the daj1 j that they would have nothing to do EXPECTED REIGX OF TERROR witb- the because they IX COPPER MIXIXG DISTRICT DOESN'T APPEAR. ual." governor. ''There is no man., in Xew Jersey'that I care'to fight or, to-oppose because of his per- class room at ,a-timJe still taking the position of !uitrit- conservative and groomed for. the presidency" .by -.Mr. ._ .-------...__________________ George B. Hawey arid otherlTepresen- strike situation in-the Kanawha coal j tical juncture -in-the history of the tatlves of -the .Wall ,'street field where West Virginia I democratic party. There is only one I Colonel Roosevelt's itiamen are maintaining martial law. -condition upon which the democratic j ed in Topeka- tonight, was devoted had learned that it-was not the pur- I sonal quality. pose of those in charge of the meet- "We ar.e at a critical juncture tti the ing to permit a discussion of the j history of America, and'at "a very crl- in the-appearance of Bingham camps meeting was postponed in an the-confide; today suggested a reign ot tettor such (fort to bring-th'e leaders of the min- the. nation and 'that condition i nce 'of is that as was feared five days ago when ers and the operators together, it was i-it should have itself true and true men, chiefly foreigners, ex- changed their tools for firearms and celebrated their mastery of the mines by promiscuous firing. The peace of- ficers, however, increased- their forced, now raised to ties. 00 armed depu- A large proportion of the sheriff's force was 'scattered along the railroad militia officers were inspecting ground and interpretation put and upon the preparations was that -the j that its purpose was solely for 4 the- mining companies were about, to discussion of industrial dispute-act to jaoetponed again, but-convened before [absolutely committed to progressive President White issued a statement to the governor in which he said: "We- were led to believe that the conference was called for the pur- pose of discussing the.present strike, and to -find some method by which it might be adjusted, but in a prelim- inary conference In the governor's of- fice, it was brought to our attention, make an attempt to operate mines with non-union men. their General Manager Jackling of the be -submitted to the next legislature and' it was not contemplated in ahv' _ u'ay to enter into" a "discussion of Utah -Copper company has insisted j real problem of the strike -of the prea- that a; majority of his" men in .sympathy with the strike and .has have no hope whatever-of being ehos- ent hour. We are much disappointed STARTS -TAKE that this 'conference, does not con- F- REBELS.TO EAST --DEMAXDS.ItE- PJEUSOJfER, Beared .i part: "Mr.- Kenyon mnnv R.. G. Stewart, ac- stood .fijr-the party .that had honored i cused leader of the 'bull moose move- -He'toQk a-position'that he "can.j-------------------------------------------------- Believe that 'evtry' (Concluded on Page Two.) CHICAGO MILK DEALERS TO BE RJEPUBLICAXS OF OHIO HAVE HALF GAIN'. FIGHT IX" FULL SWDfG NOW. Douglas, 'Ariz., Sept. movements to the east and" west of .Agua Priota were reported today, leading to the conclusion that the mobilization of bands with the view of taking Prieta has failed. A band of S50 insurgents was re- ported, to have gone through San Miguel Paes, Chihuahua, carrying with them the twenty-one bars of sil- ver and gold bullion stolen from the lEl 'Tigre mine when it was captured by Salazara. a week ago. The bars of bullion weighed 150 pounds each. They were packed on mules, stolen declared that -all ?vhp wish.- to .work i template- such discussion. -We wish stitfufa have-an .opportunity to do so j to saj% however, that.we.are anxious' I without molestation." rand to meet the operators in 1 President Charles H. Mover, of the-, joint conference anytime." Western "Federation of Miners, asserts f .Addresses Miners. that-th" ere will be no trouble until It is prov-oteed by the deputy sheriffs. He Is busily engaged in preparing, another strike- at Ely, Nevada, -wtiere he expects 3.500 men employed by .the Nevada. Consolidated, a mine control- led by the Utah Copper company, to out if their demands for higher largely to a reply to-Governor'Wil- son's recent addresses.' -He'came--tft Topeka.-.after a day's HI Kansas.' He: spent" the7 afternoon ,ln Ottawa and stopped .for -a" few jSfn- uatesan .Lawrence, the home ernbr Stubbs. At each- place he wM met by large crowds. "At Detroit yesterday." saidr- Col- onel 'Roosevelt, Wilaon a statement that the grew faster during, my -administration -pri- viously. Let" him be-> traiik '-enough sjid, manly, enough cannot deny, my admioSstration was the first .ever undertook to.: enforce: tho-ifo.w against the trusts. Most of the---, growth ferred to -was merely a growth' in cor- porations due general- prosper- ity. But the ,reason ,-w.hy. there, any growth in illegal trusts fttr all is from Bishop LHlywhite floras. of Colouel Demands Release. Mesico Citj-, Sept, the usual channels of diplomatic Inter- course, the American ambassador, Henry Lane Wilson, has made a premptory demand on Governor Ma- tias Guerra, of the state of Tamauli- o.-Sept States' Columbus, O.. Sapt. charges tional and state republican campaigns were opened today and. officially .put i Officials today prepared to make thorough investigation of by "farmers and.shippers that the'price'of milk in Chicago is con-, national and state campaign commlt- trollcd by a combination in- violation pas, for the Immediate release from the jail at Tairipico of -W. C. Nichols, an American fruit- grower. JCichols was arrested six months ago on- a charge of having killed "an outlaw named Caballos. Ambassador Wilson declares that he will secure Nichols' release' even, if it should become necesaary to. land marines from the United States cruis- er Des Moines. The American- am- bassador regards the treatment ac- corded Nichols by the Mexican au- thorities are percution. The jail in which Nichols is con- fined is filthy and overheated. ATR- .bassador Wilson has, treated the mat- ter several months diplomatically but has met with "delays .and accomplish- j.ed little. In his note to the governor, l the ambassador, reminded him that his message was not official, but that na- Tras considered none the less I authoritative. o n c bwuvhj i f J" .t i in full swing at two mass meetings byj Til I 111 IT lit i a number or speakers supplied by the I I 111 1-fttiftrisi and srate eamrioltm commit- i IHlfcpH W I Wl of the.-Sherman. law, It fceeanj.es known today-that United States At- Senat'or Henrj- Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts delivered the keynote I torney General Wickersham has sane- speech to which he eulogized the re-JTORPODO BOAT DESTROYER tioned the proposed investigation and 'it.is probable that witnesses -will.be summoned to appear 'before the fed- eral'grand jury when it meets Octo- be Inquired into is ber' 'One- point to" why -the farmer receives but '3 1-2 cents a quart for his milk- while the Chicago' consumer is required to pay publican party, denounced -the demo- cratic party and practically ignored the progressive party. The senator unqualifiedly defended the adminis- tration of President Taft. Senator. Lodge's speech at tonight's meeting sharply attacked, the recall of judges and the initiative' and refef- fendum. eight cents .a quart. The operations "We'are .'facing a. situation much Iff the Illinois Milk Dealers associa- j like the one for which Lincoln 'gave it is expected, be under his preservation of the con- tfon'-will, scrutiny. .Charles F. division head of the -department of justice, iras in stitution of the United States Is what we are fighting he declared. Following his brief speech the sen- PORTER, OF WAR IXJURED IX OOLXJSIOX. wages and Ignored, union recognition are HADLEY RELEASES HIS APPOINTEES IXOOR LEADER OF BOOSEVELT TO AXXOUN'CE HIS POSITION OX CANDIDATE. Jefferson City. Mo., Sept, ernor who'was floor leader for Colonel Roosevelt id the republi- can national convention and who since has not taken an. active part in politics, stated tonight that he had notified all of his appointees in the state that he has released them from obligations to him and that they are free to support any presidential can- didate. Governor Hadley Is expected to announce his position in St. Louis next Thursday when he is scheduled to open the republican campaign in the state. BORPEN ORDAINED Whiting Borden, Millionaire Minister, to Take Up-life's "Work in Kama, China. Chicago, Sept. Whiting Borden. the young Chicago. minister, who has decided ta become a foreign missionary in China, was ordained a minister of the gospel at a local church tonight. The Rev. John T. Stone, delivered the 'charge to the theological student. The church -was crowded, wit'n. friends of the young: minister. He will take several years to com- plete the course of .the study he has mapped out as a preparatory career, and upon the completion of this course, will leave for Kansu, China, I which province "will be the scene of his first missionary work. While efforts -were being made to outline a course'of action -for the con- ference, -Vice President1 Hayes ad- dressed .a large audience, of striking miners and their sympathizers and Mother Jones another au- dience almost within -the shadow of the state capital. When the meeting finally wan call- ed to order by Gov. Glaascock late in the afternoon, he. stated that the con- ference would consider the question of a minimum wage, high cost of liv- ing and settlement of future labor troubles by but the min- ers' strike on Paint and Cabin creeks wotild not be discussed; A statement presented by coal op- erators of the state that their "pres- ence in this conference is not to be taken as recognition of the United Mine Workers of America" finally created such confusion-that a motion to adjourn was pur and carried. Disappointed over the "outcome of the conference. Gov. GlasBcock tonight made the'following statement: More Serious.XOT. FX5K BtJLL MOOSTC MUCH IMPROVED PHTSTCALL5> were -with them'., "-Mr.' ftvsland, doing'His campaign "being miflttle Betnsrt to. Bead. 0-itfe.rnia. M the' nomlriaa" of'the pro- I "Mr-- .states .In, raUwt- greaslvo party for the vice prwldency; j "bad cloHd here tonight with- at- not to- 'clieckMhe twided mectlnjr at the Central Ar- the triwta. _ Ifow_ mory. Immediately upon flnlnhJng he took a train for Torfc. He will spend tomorrow night and..Monday-'-aJid Tuesday 'will open eastern tour with a. speech. In Wor- cester, Mass. The- governor made but two speech- es-'today, the one here and an after- noon address in Akron where the meeting marked, the official opening of the progreMlve campaign in' Ohio. Arthur L. Garford, progressive can- didate for'governor, and several other of the party candidates-for.'state of- fices spoke, All accompanied the governor here and participated in to- night's meeting. A rest has Improved the governor physically and tonight he said he felt WUson does -not know this to an absolute miwtatement it is dne to hid deliberate- refuM.1 to read what 'I have Bal-d; In my vtatement -the direct ot that .which Sir, Wilaon- alleges.' "Mr. Wllaon says that our proposed commlwloo, 'would not tell .bow men should admitted into the Held of competition with the trortL' is absolute mliHtatemeBt Thto Our platform says explicitly that oiir.com- -itiiseion muat attack unfair .competi- tion. If Mr. Wilson should to read It before attacking: It. would have saved. -me of that he directly In- verted thfa .truth about it" that '-they', we a he would be in good condition to en- 'blff- cruel.' Tito 'benefit' ana mwatatsment that I car abruptly today, will be turned over to j the. commission investigating mine I conditions and presided over by'B. P. DonaTlue of' Wheeling, "W. Va.. with I ter upon his eastern Invasion, The j private ''Sunset" in which he has 5? "All the questions included-in my I travelling, was abandoned here. taeorv that Oelng. iunny--wnen 11 for the meeting, which "ended BO" I. he made it "It. Mr. I cordially .advise rhtm to -let his -fin- >ome. other'.outlet .than that i of deliberate-misrepresentation: "Mr. Wilson's-knowing of-what-z aa president gained. from-the seclusion of the-claasroom.. "The trouble .with .'.Mr. -IB- fundaznentaL Profeasing 'the -views he has repeatedly in his during the thkt he a -reactionary, eighteen months doubtless rtn- oerely, he abandoned hie-reactloiuuT beliefs, he is wholly unable to advo- cate or devlse-acy plan which.wfll really control the trrwti. FATHER OP i_______ SCOFFED BEVOLtT- TIOX WILL TlttOMPH.'' El Paxof .Sept. cried-derialve federal mrmpathiaers at L..- the railroad station when -Colonel rJri Pascual Orojeco, former- military chief i -f11 l8 like of to :Mr. conference with Health Commissioner ator left for "the east at p..m. Young' for several hours in connec-i Other speakers .tonight were Robert Won tiofa; conference with Cnited, States Attor- ney James H. 'with the. proposed investiga- Later Mr. Dewoody held a. long Xew York, Sept. 21. -.The torpedo boat destroyer Porter last of the fleet of destroyers which did memor- iable work in the Spanish-American war, may be retired from service, it was said today, as the result of in- juries sustained last Thursday when she was rammed by a tug in Butier- i milk channel. An investigation to- dav indicated that her keel. had been reputured by the collision. The Porter was going out to set Brown, candidate for governor, ex- Thursday when the tug George Congressman James E. Watson of In-! SchuTtz came up on the portside and diana, 'Tom L. Lewis, nominee for sec- through misunderstanding- of signals of state. LIMIT WOMAX SUFFRAGE. ,on.! STAY AT MILWAUKEE rammed her amidships The Porter put back to the dry dock in the navy yard and the holding of a board publicity to the (rl T TLE VJ I..J.1, L nU yew RfungarlaJi Reform Bill Win C fer" Limited Amount ot Suffrage. .'Budapest, Sept. new Hur.- Cubs .Withdraw Draft .on giirlan. firajichise reform bill which -is to Take Vr OAl 4 in be introduced by the government! List. f-" will it is confer! J. I a limited measure of -woman's1'suf-j. Chicago. Sept. Chicago St-rved Twenty-lbroc Ycan-s Jn Prison 'frage. It is believed that the f ran- i league team today withdrew! for Mimlor of ohiae will-be extended to women who j its draft on Russell Blackburne. for-j Confesses. have paaseil certain state examina- ivncr shortstop of the Chicago Ameri- i tloiis and'.who r.ianage'tlieir own es-i can league cluh. President Coraiskey Huniington. Ind., Sept. or businesses or who arc other-{ who bad second oal! on the player .Tohn. Epps, xi-hr. served independent. From to also refused to irtUe him. so that years" in the Jndliina prison women will bo affected. i Blackburne will stay in Milwaukee. for the murder of her husband an A revised list of players drafted by I was paroled six years :igo. has PIBST FOOTBALL GAME. the" Chicago' National leaK" team fol- i been vindicated, it was lo.irr.nd to- hurjr high-school by a of .46 to j inficldcn.-Tantz.- Birmingham; catch- j that he .poisoned his brother, n men -ftf: Btfghamnier. --Lincoln, inflelder: Epps been living Hi Toledo, Racine., OhfA _, __ Willie The WeatHCr Instructlon to make a-report auch aa they may deem proper. In the meet-, ing today the coal operators created conditions which the conference ap- parently could not accept and the ad- journment was the natural result. I am very sorry. "The failure of the meeting to pro- duce tangible results will have no ef- fect the Cabin and Paint creek strikes except to intensify the said state Labor Commis- sioner L V. Barton. "It now resolves 'Itself into a question of endurance be- operators- -and men." President White, of- the "United Hlne Workers and others oi the mine leaders will leave here tomorrow j of Juarez.- and father' of the leader of j morning for Montgomery, W. Va. the Mexican revolution, arrived to-1' i night Texas, said that the_union-ought_to to an alleged smuggler, In custody of Preserved -and then a. United States marshall. I not anyway to' "The revolution-will re-jj11'- Alteon says that it: Is; torted the aged Oroaco to the crowd fine Purposes for helping labor of hooting Mexicans who followed him out.he against -every to the county jair j Pedient toward that-end- "Mr. Wilson Coatless, only a thin cotton shirt 'ls.The .Buchanan" of the present ihdus- aKorded him protection from the jtnal situation In the; Lnited sharp wind. Tomorrow he will be At Ottawa Colonel Roosevelt given a preliminary examination on a H: -Thompson, democratic .charge of murder preferred bv the i candidate for Lni senator, AS RESULT "OP -rVVESTIGATlOX Mexican, consul at El Paso who "seeks i frorn Kansas, had-uttered a "delib- his extradition to Mexico. I erate falsehood" iir saying that. ''the i Roosevelt "campaign-fund in 1904 i amouiated to- rVT -Lii JL XL I Emporia. where he xtil! spend Boston, Sepi. fourth ar- Sunday with William Allen White, rest to result from the Suffolk county [Experts Claim Chemistry Will Make i progressive national committeeman. grand jury investigation of the al- j Tropical Fruit Around. i leged 'dynamite "planting" in Law- j Chicago. rence, daring the textile strike last j January, occurred today when VTil- j Chicago. Sept. 21. bushes i !iam R. Rice, an East iHlzon quarry and tropical fruit can be made to owner, was taken into custody. He grow in Chicago" by means of extra was arrested on an indictment charg- stimulation and the exercise of appli- Ing1 illegal transportation ot" dynamite j ed chemiEtry, according: to Dr. David and furnished ball. i T. Day, petroleum specialist of, the .William M. Wood, president of the fedferal geological who v.-ith American Woolen company, Frederick i several hundred other chemists a.r- A. Eatuoax. president of s mill sup-j rived here today to attend a convcn- j ply concern nnd Dennis J. Collins, a lion of chemists. I Cambridge dog fancier, nre nxvaitins j can he done by rakins; nltro; LAWREXCE STRIKE AF- FAIR RICE PINCHED j trial charged conspirru-y in ihei'out or the nllfged Illegal of tile ex-! Tilosivc. HAWKINS IS CITOSKN. St. Va'.-il. State; Senator E. R. ti.-uvktns of Pulinh nhosen as thti Mlnnesuta iiiembcr ,'-f j republican i-ommitu-c to; i tijJfet'Uie plnuu of 1. A. who I lias I'oHcuvir.s thr i I t'nin iu Cliloago, at :i mceiinjc -suite committee today. tlr and i: in tlu- Dr. Du.y. "It has been lenrne.l that the suns rays oa.n i.-e in vrgcisaion in untold ITIXER.XKV OF COLONEL FOR NEXT -DAYS THROUGH JiAXSAS. AX1> MISSOTTRT. IOWA Sunday, protwbiy mln rioNh portion, Monday fair. RAt'lv. York. inolor 'Vnn the 2-1 hnijr tem-i raco 'at the Brighton to- Ctmidy 'The distance covered, 1.374 mil'-s. by usinp the- nUr.ig'i'n in air for fertiliser. The aiotho.j incli'des ilie passing of :dr through tv.bo to an el.-ctrlc .ire forming electric arcs. i OX TUlltl> TK.'KKT. Marengo, Sept. pe- tictort the ci-unly iliior jrhfr-rdsy r.fimJnatlnK II. K. Uutti-r North rfnre- j-sion fin pros.rfs- roi slv..- ticket. -Mr "Ihu'rr is rlothins I wr.r York. Coior.el- TtDi.si-vfit's.itinerary tht- next ten days .-is nrriingfd by the progressive tonight. Missouri arui Vik- wil! sec1 him in Cliv next four lit- will arrive- al Little Ark., iit SMTi nr. ;'u- iaih and will address t.-. t'.'.t, Oulf Dt-t-p in Little Rock at 11 a. in. An t'oiniml Rooycwlt will rifldivss till- n rstnif Ifvct- cowmis- Etc- wii! spettd the south and will CtrolinKS and C H now 2) hour rpoorcl. old record ihf-y c-r-ci l-.iai. r.r.rt dcJf.orrs'.B are incHnlnr: tn the beilpf thru this dcvolcpY.ieni Injure? the c'.fcTior' of tho nom- The i inee, C. C. and .-i for 'Dan KaniU'.on S. 'rill leave the iSh at a., rn., for Atlantic City mud trtlt co to I'-.ystor- Bay and rest at for several cluys.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication