Cedar Rapids Gazette, December 31, 1974, Page 7

Cedar Rapids Gazette

December 31, 1974

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Issue date: Tuesday, December 31, 1974

Pages available: 22

Previous edition: Monday, December 30, 1974

Next edition: Wednesday, January 1, 1975

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Publication name: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Pages available: 2,920,552

Years available: 1932 - 2016

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 31, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tues., Dec. 31, 1174    7 Television Today By John J. O’Connor Big George! >0: Virgil Partch Benny    Was Radio's Creation NEW YORK (NYT) - Al-though he was successful on television, in nightclubs and even on the stage in “one-man” shows, .lack Benny was perhaps the most enduring and astonishingly shrewd creation of radio. For anyone growing up in the Uhs and ‘4th, Sunday night at 7 o’clock meant Jack Benny and “the gang.” Week after week, the east regulars went through a series of thoroughly predictable routines. Week after week, listeners at home laughed along with the studio audience. The brilliantly calculated Benny persona, offering magnanimous displays of the hilariously petty, was being fixed securely in the public’s affection. His radio years began in the depression. Radio was concentrating on entertainment. There were very few regular news formats in those days. Not surprisingly, the center of the entertainment spotlight was held by veterans of vaudeville. In addition to Jack Benny, there were Eddie Cantor, George Burns and Grade Allen, Al Jetson, Ed Wynn and Phil Baker. By 19.17, Jack Benny had edged out Eddie Cantor for top position in the “hooperat-ings”. In 1950, a couple of years before the television explosion, he was still No. I in the ratings. Meantime, he had used radio lo develop a national character of rare longevity. The vehicle consisted of nothing but sound and. with the Benny sense of faultless timing. silence. The old Maxwell auto sputtered and coughed. The endless series of locks protecting the cellar bank vault squeaked and clanked The pay telephone and cigaret machine in the living room noisily consumed coins. The immediately recognizable Benny family was created by a group of performers stand# mg in front of microphones. The effect was a eombina lion of intimacy and elusiveness, a combination still unique to radio. The disem-Irndied voices became personal friends, jKThaps vaguely linked to faces in press photographs. The contexts and settings were constructed in the imaginations of the listener. The very lack of visual literel-ik'ns expanded the possibilities for radio. All of that changes, of course, with television. The new medium proved considerably more devouring than the old. Seeing the1 old Maxwell was not quite as funny as hearing it. Seeing it a second time was not nearly so funny as hearing it for the 100th time. The quality of elusiveness was lost. The Benny program and other radio formats did have respectable runs on telev ision, but the medium was ^stowing its “blockbuster” successes on more “visual” material — Milton Boric’* mugging, Sid Caesar's skits, the pandemonium of “Laugh-In”. But the blockbusters, too, were eventually devoured None were as long-lived as the old-time radio favorites. The Kenny program, hewev er, survived. It did not depend on one-line jokes or energetic physical routines. He could still show up on his own specials or as a guest star getting incredible mileage out of his penny-pinching routines or deadpan silences On one of his last television appearances, in an Anne Bancroft special called “Annie and the Hoods”, he played a psychiatrist listening to the silly prattle of a patient. He didn t utter one word He didn’t have to The radio character had become a national institution. I 1,400 Ford Trucks Recalled DETROIT (UPI) - Ford Motor ('0. said Monday it is recalling 11,4(MI late model light trucks with a front axle defect that could cause the axle to break under certain conditions. The 1974 and 1975 F-250 trucks, equipped with four-wheel drive, were assembled with front axle spindles that could crack under extended driving conditions. A Ford spokesman said there have been no reports of accidents attributed to the faulty axle. The defect was found in laboratory tests, the spokesman said. Television Listings 7_KWVVI TV, Waterloo 9—KCRG TV, Cedar Rapids 2—WMT TV, Cedar Rapid* 3—KTVO, Ottumwa 4—WHBF TV, Rock Wand 6—WOC TV, Davenport §—WHRT, LaCrotte IO—KROC-TV, Rochester 12—KUN TV, Iowa City 13—WHO TV, Des Mom#* tuesday Might 7 New*, Weather 9 tyewitne** New* 2 Action New* 3-New*, Weather 4 A aeon New* 6 New*, Weather 8 New*, Weather IO New*, Weather I 2 Earthfceeping 13 Eyewitness New* :30 7 New* Special 9 Hollywood Sq* 2 To Tell Truth 3 Candid Camera 4 Hee How 6 Funny Sport* 8 Consequence* IO-let * Make Deal 12 Secret* of Deep I 3 let * Make Deoi :00 7 Orange Parade 9 Sugar Bowl 2 Candid Camera 3 Sugar Bowl 6 Orange Parade 8 Good Time* IO Oronge Par ode 12 America 13 Orange Par ode :30 2 M*A*S*H 4 M*A*S’H 8 M*A*S‘H 12 Raitt Butterfield 1:00 7 NBC Movie 2 Hawaii Five-O 4 Hawaii Five-O 6 NBO Movie 8 Hawaii Frve-O IO NBC Movie 13 NBC Movie 1:30 12 One of Kind 1:00 2 Barnaby lone* 4 Barnaby Jones 8 Barnaby Jones 12 Sound»fage 0:00 7 New*, Weather 9 Eyewitne** New* 2 Action Newt 3 New*, Weather 4 Action Newt 6 Newt, Weather 8 Newt, Weather IO-News, Weather I 2 Day at Night I 3 E yewrtnet* New* 0:30 7 Tonight 9 Wide World 2 Guy Loo (boldo 3 Wide World 4 Guy Lombardo 6 Tonight 8 Guy lombordo 10 Tonight 12 Feeling Good I 3 Tonight 1:30 12 Concert 3:00 7 Tomorrow 32—KRIN TV, Waterloo 2-Movie- Here Come Girl*” 4-Movie Rood to Boti 6-Tomorrow 10-Echoe* Colvory 13-Tomorrow Wednesday Morning 6:30 4 New Zoo Revue 13 Not Women Only 7:00 7-Todoy 2 CBS New* 4 CBS New* 6 Today 8 CBS New* 10- Today I 3-Today 7:30 9 Romper Room 3-lewis Family •:00 9 New Zoo Revue 2 Copt Kangaroo 3 Sesame Street 4 Copt Kangaroo 8 Copt Kangaroo •:30 9 Morning Show 9:00 7-Jr Ornge Prde 9 . _ 2 3 4- ICont d Cont d Cont d) Mike Douglas Rose he Pai<mu- Cartoon* Rose Pre-Parade 6-Jr. Ornge Prde 8 Rote Pre Parade IO Jr. Ornge Prde 13- Jr. Ornge Prde 9:30 2 Cotton Parade 3 Reed Farrell 4 Cotton Parade 8 Cotton Parade 9:45 7- Ro*# the Parade 6 Rom Pre Par ode IO-Ro*# Pre Parade 13-Rot# Pre Parade 10:00 9 All My Children 3 Att My Children 10:30 7- Rote Parade 9 Brody Bunch 2-Rote Parade 3 Brady Bunch 4-Ro*# Parade 6 Rote Parade 8 Rose Parade IO-Rote Parade I 3-Rote Parade 11:00 9 Password 3-Pot* word 11:30 9 Split Second 3 Split Second Wednesday Afternoon 13:00 7 Parade (Cont d) 9 Eyewitness Newt 2 Pat ode (Cont d) The Investor’s Guide ' f hat is NO I my tar pool'" Ervin Farewell Urges Truth, Faith, Courage 3 Davi» Cup 4 Parade (Cont d I 6 Pot ade (Cont d 8 Parade IO Par od* 13 Par ode 12:30 9 let * Make Deal 3 let » Make Deal I 2:45 7 Rote Bowl Prey 6 Rose Bowl Prey IO Ro*# Bowl Prey I 3 Rote Bowl Prey 1:00 7 Circut Town 9 $ 10.000 Pyramid 2 Cotton Bowl 3 $ 10,000 Pyramid 4 Cotton Bowl 6 Circut Town 8 Cotton Bowl IO-Circut Town 13-Circut Town 1:30 9 Big Showdown 3 Big Showdown 2:00 7 Magic Holiday 9 General Hospital 3 General Hospital 6 Magic Holiday IO Magic Holiday 13 Me^c Holiday 2:30 7 NSC News Spec.: 9 One life To live 3 One Lite To live 6 NBC News Spec. 10-NBC News Spec. 1 3 NBC New* Spec 3:00 9 Money Mare 3 Money Mare 12 Adv of Cotlo 3:30 7 Rote Bowl 9 1974 Retrospect 2 Dr Man 3 Movie 4 Mike Douglas 6 Rote Bowl 8 Bewitched IO Rose Bowl 12 Hodgepodge I 3 Rose Bowl 4:00 8 Mike Douglas 1 2 Misterogvrs 4:30 9 Mod Squad 2 Partridge tam 4 Hogan * Heroes I 2 Sesame Street 5:00 2 Consequences 4 GiNigan Island 3:30 9 ABC Newt 2 CBS News 3 ABC News 4 CBS Newt 8 CBS New* I 2 Electric Co. WASHINGTON (AF) - In a farewell statement before his retirement, Sen. Sam J. Ervin.jr.. says fear is America s great enemy, a corrosive and destructive force that can be overcome by truth and faith and courage. Here, in his last newsletter to North Carolina constituents, the former chairman of the senate Watergate committee sets forth a personal philosophy: “The canny Scotsman, Thomas Carlyle, made a profound observation when he said, Man lives by believing in something: not by debating and arguing many things.’ “Faith and courage constitute two of our most basic needs.... “Faith, which is the evidence of things not seen, proves to men and women the reality of the positive beliefs by which we live and for which we are willing to die. Inner Farce “Faith is not a storm cellar to which men and women can flee for refuge from the storms of life. It is, instead, an inner force which gives them the strength to face those storms and their consequences with serenity of spirit. In times of greatest stress. faith has the miraculous jh»w-er to lift ordinary men and women to greatness. “Faith is exhibited at its ijcst in the lives of those men and women who trust the promises of God ... “Fear has been the devastating enemy of mankind in alt generations. “We must distinguish between fear which is foolish and anxiety which is wise Prudent Steps “Anxiety causes one concern almut future events likely to occur and induces one to take provident steps to prepare for them, whereas fear fills one with dread of dangers which an* imaginary or dangers w hich cannot tx* avoided. “People are probably more fearful today than they wen* at any time in the [last. They are assailed on all sides by the old fears such as fear of economic insecurity, fear of unemployment, fear of loss of stature, fear of sickness, and fear of death Hut if we are to overcome the fears which be* set us, we must have courage. “Joanna Baillie described courage aright in this verse: ’The brave man is not he who finds no fear, ‘For that were stupid and irrational; ‘But he, whose noble soul its fear subdues, 'And bravely dares the danger nature shrinks from.’ 2 Kinds of Courage “Courage falls into two categories. These are physical courage, which enables one lo brave physical dangers, and moral courage, which empow-crs one to carry the burdens and take the heavy blows of life without losing heart.... “Courage often comes through the realization that the alternative to the impending danger is more dreadful than the danger itself.... “Finally, courage results from having faith in ourselves, faith in the righteousness of our cause, and faith in the promises of God. “lf we will seek truth, keep faith, and have courage, I have no doubt that this nation can overcome all challenges from within and without." Dad Not Liable For College Cost ST. LOLIS (UPI) - A Mis-sour! court of appeals judge has upheld a lower court decision that a 24-year-old man cannot sue his father for unpaid education costs. Hoy Lieberman filed suit against his father, Norton Lieberman, trying to force him to pay for his last two years at the University of Missouri at Columbia. St. I»uis County Circuit Judge Orville Richardson had ruled that "the law regards the normal child as capable of supporting himself at the age of 21 years ” Appeals Court Judge Albert Rcndten agreed. Earlier this year the appeals court rejected a suit by Norton Lieberman’s wife. De-lores Ruth Block, seeking a similar judgment. By Sam Shu Inky (J —• I’ye been giving my grandchildren F bonds for their birthdays. My son finds that common shares would be a better long-term investment, based on the theory that long-term appreciation would approximate the inflation rate. This’ I find hard to buy on the basis of my experience over the last IO years. A — Anyone looking back over the last eight stock market years would find it hard “to buy.” However, I think you will agree that anyone planning a program for youngsters ought to take a longer view. I can see F bonds for a 100-percent protected 6-percent accrual plan available, for example, for college tuition bills. But if you are looking more than five or 111 years ahead, I must proceed on the basis that common shares are needed as a “leavening” agent. (J — I bought some treasury notes recently through my bank and was charged $108.75 for handling. Why? A — Hanks charge a handling fee because handling such a deal exists the*m money and, in your specific case, probably involved payment of a commission to a securities broker. There is no reason you shouldn't ask the bank to explain. Unless you bought a very large amount of bonds the bi: sounds high. Are you sure some of that money doesn't represent accrued interest — for which the buye*r is liable? Q — My broker suggested I buy Federal Home Loan hank bonds. Now I read that th«*y are not guaranteed by the U. S. government. Are they safe? A — The FULK agency’s bonds are not backed by the full faith arid credit of the U. S. — few agency bonds arc. But, the bonds are issued under an act of congress, are issued and payable through the Federal Reserve banks, are legal investments for federally-supervised institutions, may be bought and held, without limit, by national banks, are eligible as collateral for Federal Reserve bank advances and discounts and arc exempt from state and local taxation. I’d say you were in pretty good company and have little reason to worry. Q — I'm an elderly man interested in both treasury notes and General Motors Acceptance Corp. bonds. Which is better? The* GMACs yield more. A — Moody rates GMACs “AAA” and Standard and Boor's “AA.” The treasuries, of course, are highest quality. On the day your letter arrived a GM AC bond due in 1999 had a current yield of 8.8 percent and one due in three years (1977) was yielding 8.6. Treasuries of the same maturity were yielding 8 (Hi and 7.59, respectively. While I don’t think a million dollars worth of each of the bonds would hurt you one bit — there’s the ‘‘official score” to which I can add nothing. Q — I have $10,060 in Federal Home Loan bank bonds due in 1980, carrying a 7% percent coupon. Should I sell out, take the loss and buy a higher coupon bond? A — I’d be inclined to say no Your bonds are down from liar because interest rates have risen a bit since you bought them. But their current yield is good and their yield to maturity is in line with other bonds in this group. After you get through paying commissions and perhaps paying a bit more than the published bid (since you are dealing in only Kl bonds) I don’t think you would improve your position. Q — Two years ago I bought4.512 gallons of Scotch whisky as an investment. It is now aging and is eight years old. I would like to sell i\ but a broker I contacted offered me only about one-fourth of the price I paid for it Should I hold or dump? A — I’m sorry, but I am not a Scotch whisky expert. All I have to go on is the warning of the official Scotch Whisky Assn. in Scotland that this is no field for novices. Eve tried for years to get this warning across. Mr ShoKKv welcome* written Question*, but Se will be obie to provide an swer* only ftirouoh the column For information to check on obsolete securities, please include a self addressed, stamped envelope Address your requests to Sam Shuls*y, care of The Gazette Prison Guards Storm Hospital, Rescue 2 Women Being Stabbed WALLA WALLA, Wash. (AP) — Guards stormed their way into a prison hospital to rescue two women hostages who were being stabbed by convicts in one of two disturbances at the Washington state penitentiary. The women were among 13 persons held hostages by prisoners during the disturbances which occurred at nearly the same time Monday. All of the hostagt*s were later freed. “Things are quiet,” A. J. Murphy, prison information officer, said Monday night. “Everyone has bevil returne*d to his cell.” Murphy said charges probably will be filed against the two inmates involved in the* hospital violence. Their identities were not rek*ased. Released lectors The two inmates forced their way onto the first floor of the three-story hospital and first seized two doctors. Them they released the doctors and moved to the seeond floor, taking six more hostage's, Murphy said. Prison Supt B J. Rhay and Aide Janie's Harvey ne'gotiate'el with the inmates from the first floor for altout one hour before 25 specially trained guards carrying riot sticks storme'd the floor and frevd the hostage's. As the guards entered the hospital, the inmate's Ix'gan stabbing two women hostages, authorities said. They salt! the two inmates by that time we're under the influence of seized hospital drugs. In (>9«d ( ondilien Stubbed were Wanda Goins, a registered nurse, and Annie Sporleader, a dental assistant. Injured by broken glass were Delores Day, an office worker, and Mrs. Gem* Mille*r, an X-ray technician. All blur were reported in good condition at local hospitals. About the same* time, some inmates toeik control of a cellblock wing and held five guards hostage. Rhay and Harvey negotiated for their re-lease after entering the cellblock unarmed. There were no injuries reported in that disturbance and the 2(H) inmates in the wing were returned to their Veils while    guards searched for weapons. • Officials said they did not know how many of the 200 look part in the disturbance, but they believed it was a small number. Grievances Just be'fore the    disturb ances, Rhay received a four-page list of grievances from the prisoners council which involved disciplinary rules, medical care, and, “you know, the usual things,”    Murphy said. He declined to    elaborate further . Mrs. (loins said she heard one innate talking to others in the prison on the hospital telephone*. “They were planning to burn the whole place down,” she said. However, Murphy said there was no indication the list of inmate grievances was linked to the two incide'nts, or that the disorders were related to each othe*r. '“Otherwise, the other wings of the prison would have gone, too,” he said. The prison houses l.(H)2 inmates. •    9 It Pays to Advertise Canadians Name Street for Ho BRANTFORD. Ont. (LIM) -A new industrial-area street in this southwestern Ontario town is to be named the Ho (’hi Minh Trail — for (Vie bombed but enduring Communist supply line through Laos during the Vietnam war. But not everyone is happy. “It seems very out of place,” said a local factory manager. "I think some kind of protest is in order." ON THIS DATE in 1890. Gen. George C. Marshall was born in Uniontown. Pa. VISIT The Office of Dr. C. R. Kitchen Optometrist • Eyes Examined • Glasses Fitted • Contact Lenses Sears By appointment only 395-6236 ( toted Sun and Mon. Lindale Plaza Faisal Named ‘Man of Year’ NEW YORK (AP) - King Faisal of Saudi Arabia has been named Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1974. The magazine, which has been citing a Man of the Year annually since Charles Lind-bcrg was first so designated in 1927, said King Faisal “now holds mon* (tower than any other leader” to control the price of oil throughout the world. “Both iii his own right and as a symbol of the other newly powerful potentates of oil, Saudi Arabia's King Faisal is the Man of the Year," said Time’s cover story for the Jan K issue Wmq&C'i ... lf you want tho finest Paints NEW YEAR’S EVE LIVE ENTERTAINMENT featuring ROSS ALLEN COMBO NO RESERVATIONS NO COVER CHARGE gWSLVHJ Motor, hotel Sixteen Salads A daily selection that brings yon back to Bishops. Tossed salad? Sure We have tossed salad, but that's not the half of it. We also have gelatin salads, fruit salads, cabbage salads, up to sixteen different salads to choose from every day. And taalads are just a few of the foods that bring you back to Bishops. Stop in soon. YOU'LL FIND    « WE RE JUST A LITTLE I jihhopA BUFFET • Lindale Plaza CAFETERIA • Downtown ;