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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, December 31, 1974 - Page 21

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 31, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Ktpldi Tuts., Pec. SI, It74 Says Kapp Ruling A Personal Decision MINNEAPOLIS (AP) Commissioner Pete Riwelle says the National Football League believes the Joe Kapp ruling in which the NFL's reserve system was declared illegal "expresses the personal philosophy of the judge rather than being a ruling after a careful evaluation of the record." And in weekend interviews, Rozelle and the league's chief labor negotiator claimed the Kapp ruling would make it nearly impossible for them to negotiate a new contract with NFL players. Rozelle, interviewed here Sunday when he attended the playoff game between Minnesota and Los Angeles, said the NFL was confident the Kapp ruling by U.S. Dis- trict Court Judge William Sweigert would be overturned on appeal. "We have no plans to change any of our practices, including the draft, under the present Rozelle said. A key portion of the NFL the rule which al- lows Rozelle to decide the compensation due a team when one of its players jumps to another club and por- tions of the standard player contract were ruled illegal by Judge Sweigert. His ruling, which will be appealed by the NFL. has the effect of making all NFL players true free agents once they complete their contract and it would make draft choices free agents if. after a certain amount of time, they did not like the offer of the club which drafted them. Rozelle said the league could not go ahead with his appeal until Sweigert enters a final judgment in the case. In that judgment, Sweigert will, among other things, more clearly define when a college senior drafted by the NFL becomes a free agent. Both Rozelle and John Thompson, chief of the NFL Management Council, predicted the Kapp ruling would severely crimp negotiations for a new contract with the players. The player strike of last summer was called over many of the same issues ruled on by Sweigert. A new contract has not been signed and players have played under the old, expired contract. "I was hoping the negotiations could be handled eas- ily, but now it doesn't look like Rozelle said. Thompson said tentative arrangements had been made to reopen negotiations at the Super Bowl, but "now it's a whole new hall same." "It (Kapp ruling) compounds our problems he said. "We had been agreeable to modifying our sys- tem, but not eliminating it. But if this becomes the law of the land, the system is eliminated. "Our whole offer had been based on their (players') acceptance of compensation (Rozelle Now how can you ask us to come up with million in pension money over the next four years if we're gong to be faced with 200 Catfish Hunters next And of the Kapp decision itself. Thompson said. "It kills us." ___________________ John's Death, Iowa's Grid Climb Top Stories Steve Dangos Is Dismissed KANSAS CITY (AP) Steve Dangos, only returning starter from last season on the Missouri basketball team, was released from the squad Mon- day by Coach Norm Stewart. The Tigers were in Kansas City for the Big Eight Confer- ence preseason tournament and despite Dangos' absence, Missouri whipped Oklahoma 83-81 in two overtime pcrids Monday night for fifth place. Dangos' place in the lineup was filled by Scott Sims, a sophomore. Dangos, senior guard, was released, Stewart said, "in the best interest of the ball club. Our program is based on the premise that the team and its welfare come first." Dangos played high school basketball at Cleveland High in St. Louis and enrolled at St. Louis University. 11KS MOINKS U'l'l) The death of former Drake and Io- wa State basketball coach Maury John in October was voted the top Iowa sports story of the year in a poll of United Press International writers and broadcasters. The death of John, who had resigned the Iowa State job in July because of his failing health, edged out the naming of new basketball coachs at the three major universities as the top story. The John story received sevea first-place votes and the new coaches were named on live first-place ballots. The rejuvenation of the Io- wa football team under new coach Bob Commings was cho- sen the No. 3 sports story of the year, while the adoption of a three-class system for boys basketball was the No. 4 item. The success of several Iowa college division and junior col- lege football teams finished fifth in the balloting. Other stories getting strong consideration were the high school playoffs, the boys state basketball tournament and the accomplishments of State running back Mike Stra- chan, who set a Cyclone car- eer rushing record with yards and finished fourth on the all-time Big Eight list. The popular John died Oct. 15 at age 55 after battling can- cer of the esophagus for near- ly ten months. He had a 528- 214 career record during his 28 years of coaching, which in- cluded 13 years at Mobprly. junior college, 12 at Drake and three at Iowa State. John became aware of the cancer in December and relin- quished the coaching reins to assistant Gus Guydon for the rest of the season. He under- went chemotherapy treat- ments in Rochester's Mayo clinic and eventually attended a few Iowa State games. The late 1SU coach had said he fully intended to return to coaching for the beginning of the 1974-75 season, before re- signing July 30. Former Oral Roberts university coach Ken Trickey was named to succeed John in August. The naming of Trickey, plus new CMches at Iowa and Drake, was only three points behind John's death In the voting for top stnry. Dick Schaltz stepped down before Iowa's final game last March and was replaced by Lute Ol- son. WONDERFUL AUTO WORLD PARTI THE INCREDIBLE, UNBELIEVABLE, PERPLEXING, PROVOCATIVE, COMPLEX SIMPLE STRAIGHT LINE PART A THE PRICE COMPLEX THINGS MADE SIMPLE AMERICA'S 779 TELEVISION STATIONS, DAILY NEWSPAPERS AND 6.377 RADIO TIONS INUNDATE 210 MILLION OF US WITH PLENTY OF NEWS. THE NEXT FEW WEEKS I'D LIKE TO TRY TO REDUCE SOME OF THIS MASS OF COMPLEX INFORMATION, THAT WHICH DIRECTLY AFFECTS THE AUTO BUSINESS, TO SOMETHING PEOPLE CAN UNDERSTAND. A price, any price, a soda, a stick of chewing gum, an automobile, a house, your shoes, a share of stock in General Electric, any PRICE on any product or service IS MADE UP OF VARIABLES. It is in sorting massive numbers of variables out that prices are determined. Mathematics is the tool and inductive method (all possible facts about a process arranged in a logical order) in the reasoning system humans use to decide what price to place upon an Item offered for sale. If you were to hold nearly any of the world's ECONOMICS textbooks in your hand and look at the closed pages as you hold the book by the binding you would note at some point in the edges of the pages a gap of maybe an eighth of an inch thick. Opening the book there you would see a long fold-out chart the equivalent of maybe 12 pages thick. Go ahead, pull it out, all six foot of it. What have you got? THE PRICE. Maybe 40 lines go up and down from left to right covering perhaps a 100 year span of America's economic history. See, that line reflects the ups and downs of interest rates, another productivity, another basic resource prices, another wage rates, another disposable in- come, another gross national product. GET THE PICTURE? THIS IS A 100 YEAR CHART OF THE BASIC INGREDIENTS OF THE PRICE YOU AND I PAY FOR THE THINGS WE BUY. BUT CAN IT BE? WHAT IS THAT PERPLEXING. PROVOCATIVE, INCREDIBLE, UNBELIEVABLE LINE RUNNING STRAIGHT AS AN ARROW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT SMACK IN THE EXACT MIDDLE OF THOSE OTHER LINES 6 FOOT LONG FOR 100 YEARS? WHY, CAN IT BE, IT SURELY IS IT'S THE PRICE! IT NEVER CHANGES, IT'S PERFECTLY FLAT! Remember, in 1950, when TV sets really began invading our homes? A 7" black and white table model set (it was so heavy it seemed like it was made of lead) cost plus tax. That was it, nothing off for cash, no discounts, just Of course, you might also have to invest or more for an outside antenna and experience a dozen high voltage shorts a year in the set at an average repair cost of That's the way it was. Compare, if you will, the COLOR set of today, with a 3.5 limes larger picture tube and costing around of all things It seems to me that there is much misinformation in the news about the price. One would think 100% total economic collapse was upon us all, that prices are going crazy, that prices are going up 300% and all kinds of crazy perecnts. What is hap- pening to the price is what has always happened to the prlci! _ It goes up, it goes down but WHEN ALL THE VARIABLES IN A GIVEN PRICE ARE EXAMINED. THE PRICE NEVER CHANGES AT ALL. ANSWERS TO QUIZ WOHI.nsCOl'K: I-Truc; 2-re- cession; K-h; 4-incrcascfl; 1'alcstlno l.ilH'nitmn Mitlim NKWSNAMK: UN SilTflary- (icncral Kurt WaldhiMin MATCIIWOKDS: 2-c; J-d; 4-a; 5-h NEWSPICTUHK: Warren K. Burner SPORTI.ICIIT. 2- homo nins; 3-w; 4-Vlutiam- lliu'l All. S-Worlil Tram Tennis BOB ZIMMERMAN FORD The Won Who Put SERVICE Bock in Ttv Auto Businen a "When You Need o Car" Olson, who guided Long Ueai'h State to a 24-2 record during the IH73-74 season, was named head coach in laic March. Bob Ortegel moved up from an assistant's job to take the head coaching job at Drake after Howard Stacey resigned to enter private business. Sla- finished with a three-year mark of 34-44 with the Bull- dogs. Commings received strong support In voting for taking an Iowa foitball team was 0-11 In 1973 and turning It into a re- spectable outfit that won three of 11 games while playing one of the toughest schedules In the nation. Included in the three wins was a 21-10 upset of UCLA in the second game of the year and victories over Northwest- ern and Illinois. Kentucky 9th in AP Cage Vote By The Associated Press Kentucky tripped up Notre Dame and took a giant step in- to the Top Ten while Ihe top four teams remained un- changed in Ihe weekly Asso- ciated Press major-college basketball poll released Mon- day. Kentucky's Wildcats tamed the Irish 113-96 Saturday night and clawed their eay from 17th place a week ago to ninth with a 7-! record through games of Sawturday. Notre Dame, now 4-3, slipped into a tie with Memphis State for 19th place after being 13th a week ago. Oregon llth Oregon, 19th last week, vaulted to llth place after stretching its record lo 7-0 with triumphs over Villanova and Creighton and an 80-76 victory over Arizona Slate which put the Wolves into the final of the Far West Clasic. Despite the loss, Arizona State moved into the rankings as the No. IB team with a 9-1 re- cord. North Carolina State beat Pitt 8H-7II after trouncing Kent State and remained unbeaten at 8-0 and No. 1 in the rank- ings, 40 points ahead (if 10-0 Indiana. 26 for First Of 40 votes cast by a nation- wide panel of sports writers and broadcasters, the Wi- Ifpack received 26 first-place votes and 756 points, while the Hoosiers, holidaying in Ha- waii, garnered 11 lop votes and 716 points after clobbering Florida 98-84 and Ohio Stale 102-71 in the Rainbow Classic. UCLA retained its No. 3 ranking with two first-place voles and 668 points after win- ning (he Maryland Invitational by handing Maryland ils firsl loss of the season. The Bruins now are 8-0 while Ihe Terra- pins slipped to 7-1 and dropped lo sevcnlh from fiflhe in Ihe rankings behind Louis- ville, Southern California and Alabama. Louisville, 6-0 afler winning ils own Holiday Classic by beating Western Kenlucky and Florida Stale, received 568 poinls and Ihe remaining No. 1 vole. The Too Twenty teams In the weekly Associated Press malor college basket- ball ooll, with Ikst Dloce votes, season records through games ot Saturday. Dec. 28. and point totals. Points tabula! ed on basis ot 20-18-16 14 12 109 9 76-5 J- 1. N. Carolina St. (26) 8-0 754 2. Indiana (111 100 716 3. UCLA 80 M8 i. Louisville (I) 6-0 M8 5. Southern Cal B-0 466 6. Alabama 5-0 367 7. Maryland 71 350 8. N. Carolina 5-1 285 9. Kentucky 71 243 10. Providence 70 2D8 11. Oreoon 7-0 159 12. Ponn 7-1 141 11 Morouette 5 104 14. Arizona 8-1 S. 15 S. Carolina 5-2 60 16. Arizona 90 41 Michigan 7-1 26 IB. Purdue 5-3 16 19. Notre Dame 4-3 15 lie Memohls SI. 82 15 Others receiving votes, listed aloha botlcolly: Bradley. California, Canislus, DC Paul, Duke, Florida Slate, Kansas, Kent State. LaSolle. Long Beach State. Minnesota, Nw Mexico. Oklahoma. Ore oon State. Rutgers, St. John's N.Y Southern Illinois. Tf-nnpssee, Texas E! Paso, Vanderbllt, Washington. Pro Sports Standings PRO BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pet. Buttalo 22 13 .629 Soston 21 13 .618 ew York 19 IS ,559 Philadelphia U 21 .400 Central Division Washington 26 9 .743 Cleveland >8 14 .563 Houston 19 15 .559 Atlanta 15 21 .417 New Orleans 3 30 .091 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division Detroit 19 17 .528 KansasCltv-Omaha 20 .18 .526 Chicago 17 17 .500 Milwaukee 14 19 .424 Pacific Division Golden Stole 23 .657 Pho" GB Vj .7 hoenix 15 18 .455 Portland 15 19 .441 LosAngelcs 15 21 .417 Monday's Games Washington 103, Cleveland 90 Detroit 86, Chicago 81 Milwaukee 106, Buffalo 91 Houston 120, Los Anaeles 107 Golden State 110, Kansas Cltv-Om 102 ABA Eastern Division W L Pet. Kentucky 33 10 .697 New York 25 11 .694 St. Louis 14 24 .368 Viralnta 9 ?5 .265 Memphis 9 26 .257 Western Division Denver 31 5 .861 San Antonio 20 IB .526 Utah 19 20 .487 Indiana 14 17 .452 San Diego 13 ?l .332 Monday's Gomes Kentucky 104, Virginia 85 New York 128, Memphis 119 Utah 105, San Antonio 104 Tuesday's Game Indiana ot San Antonio Wednesday's Game Indiana at San Dlcoo Thursday's Games Virginia ot St. Louis Son Diego at San Antonio Memphis ot Utah PRO HOCKEY NHL Division GF 74 H, v N. Y. SI. Kansas Detroit Wash Ing. 197 Pltlsburoh 7, Los 3, 5 -oit New York WHA East Division W L T Pis. GF C New England 19 13 1 39 120 1 Cleveland 13 16 1 27 63 Houston Phoenix Minnesota San Dleoo Michigan Toronto Quebec Wlnnloeo Edmonton Vancouver Phoeni 17 13 16 16 15 16 11 22 15 0 38 139 Set 8 Iowa Swim Records BELOIT.WIS. -Six swim- mers from Cedar Rapids, competing in a 45-tcam AAU swim meet field that repre- sented nine states, set eight Iowa records here in competi- tion Saturday.Sunday and Monday. Carie Goode took the 11-12- year-old individual and team trophies as she set Iowa re- cords in the 100 yard back- stroke in the 50 back- stroke and in the 200 yard freestyle Lorie Sherman, 13, swam lite.' 500 freestyle in Iowa re- cord time of Kim Wcs- cott, 10, set records in the 200 free 100 free and the 100 fly Lorie Sherman, Jill Klinge, Carie and Cathy Goode com- bined for a record in the open Tree relay. Greetings to each and eviry ont of you toil for thi Veorl THOMAS H. LeBUHH, C.L.U. 832 Higloy Bldg., Codar Rapids, Iowa MASSACHUSETTS Howling Highlights The Iowa High School Ath- letic Assn.'s to crown three state basketball champi- ons was (he No. 4 sports story of the year. Under the new format, the class AA championship game will be played Friday night and the class AAA and A fi- nals will be played Saturday night. The No. 5 story of the year involved the success 'of Cen- tral college, William Pcnn col- lege and Indian Hills junior college. Central won the NCAA Division III national football championship by de- feating Ithaca, N.Y. in the Amos Alonzo Stagg bowl and Penn tied Guilford, N.C. in the Poultry Bowl. Indian Hills, ranked second in the nation, lost to Mesa, Ariz, in the Wool Bowl in Roswcll, New Mexico.' By Dtek Peymeyer Charles Whipple Rolls a 663 (.'IIARLES WHIPPLt: (157) had a real sharp night with the Saturday Strikers at legion Unes. He came eiose to a century award and earned honors for the men with 254-663. Dottic Widauf (153) was aft- er a GOO series with the Bowl- ers Choice at Lancer Lanes, She won honors for the women with 222-586. Have a safe New Year's eve and I'd also like to wish you all a real Happy New Year. Ron Gaede (169) had a real hot night and went over the century mark with 277-649. Maureen Haughenbury im- proved her average with 513, Three of the 12-year-old boys were sharp: Steve Cole 182, Greg Frese (132) 294 and Shane Posusta 183: Dave Trlpp (122) earned a century award with 226. Mary Stewart had a good night with 555, her average was 148. Flo Shoemaker had a good night with 246. John El- liott (112) shot a 185 and Peg- gy Schneider (109) fired a 181. Phylis Herb (135) was sharp with 516. Katte Brokaw (145) shot a dandy 234-545. Charlotte Bee- son (150) found the range for 223-569. Chuck Ross (124) hit a 194. Susie Petersen hit a nifty 232. Following splits were con- verted: Conrad Grant, Mary Schaefer 4-10, Larry Foster 6- 7, Bill Kulhavy 4-6-7-9-10, Ran- dy Konmrta 4-7-10, Bob Gerber 6-7-lfl and Bob Hale 7-9. Sports Results COLLEGE BASKETBALL Other Games Notre Dame 93, Butler 83 Brigham Young 100, Bradley 87 William Mary 75, Columbia 63 Tennessee 115, Vermont 66 Ohio U. 75, Chicago Loyola 63 Florida Tech. 60, Maine 57 McMurry90, Torleton 79 Dayton 71, Harvard 64 Vanderbllt 51, Mid. Tennessee 68 San Francisco St. 77, Cornell 67 Austin Peav 91, S. Mississippi 83 DePoul 76, Northwestern 63 Wis.-Whitewater 76, Wls-Green Bay 67 Turkic 83, Neb. Weslevon 79 Wichita St. 95, Memphis St. 91 E. Texas 76, Southern, Ark., St. 69 Abilene Christian 87, Carroll, Wis. 83 Doone 8fl, Concordla, Minn. 73 SI. Louis 89, Cincinnati 68 Valdasta St. 91, Auaustana 70 S. F. Austin 95, NW Louisiana 78 Utoh St. 98. Santa Clara 74 Montana 67, Puget Sound 58 Wldener 69, Cheyney St. 55 New Mexico Si. 61, tcxas-El Paso 39 Sacramento SI. B2, Callt.-Son Dieoo 64 Alusa Pacific 9t, U. of San Diego 88 Bol-crs-leld 82, North. Aril. 76 Holiday Festival Holid Cha shla 99 107 1M 125 10? SB 96 Fordham _____ Console Rutgers 91, St. JOSCOh, Pa. 56 Far West Classic Championship. Oregon 7J, Washington St. 65 Third Place Arizona St. 80, Oregon St. 71 FIHti Place Wake Forest 70, Crelonton 59 Seventh Place Boston Col. 86, Iowa 81 Rainbow Classic Championship Indiana 69, Hawaii 5! Third Place Vlllonova 87, Ohio St. 86 Finn place Tulsa 81, Penn 75 Seventh Place San Jose St. 83, Florida 80 Ocean Slate Classic Championship St John's, N. Y. 91, Providence >9 Third Place Drake 92, S Carolina 71 Fifth Place Holy Cross 107, Assumption 98 Seventh Place Brown a.. Knoae isiano ol Big Sight Championship Kansas 76, Iowa St. 75 Third Place Kansas it. BO, Nebraska 63 Fltlti Place Missouri 83, Oklahoma 81. 1 OT Seventh Place Oklahoma SI. 101, Colorado 73 Merrimactc Christmas Championship Suffolk 75, COIDV 74 Consolation Mcrrimack 93, S. Conn. St. 72 Sugar Bowl Championship LaSalle 77, Alabama 73 Consolation Furman 89, Houston BO Va. Commonwealth Championship Texas ARM 84, Va. Commonwealth 70 Consolation St. Peter's 73, Falrticld 72 Beloll Invitational Championship Go Southwestern So, Rockford 48 Consolation Beloit 65, Eckerd 61 Network Data, Modern Pipe Win .Jim Krcamer's 19 points led Network Data to a 46-3B win over Hy Vee No. 1 and Mike Hall Had 13 as Modern Pipe edged Army Recruiting, 53-50, in Slo Break basketball action at the Central branch YMCA. Gene Turner had 18 for the Recruiters. RON DESK FILE 59so Cash-F.O.B. Store KLINGER Office Supply A Equipment Co. 303 Jrd AVMNM M Thomas Won't Be Coaching BALTIMORE (AP) Ccn- eral Manager Joe Thomas, ag- onizing a bit over a "tough de- vision." said Monday (hat Joe Thomas would not return next season as coach oe the Haiti- more Colts. "No man can do a good job of handling both fulltime Thomas said, in a tele- phone interview from Florida. "Something has to give." "Not mnch has suffered so Thomas said, "but the paper work has been piling up daring the season and It's going to get worse getting ready for another season." The coaching job was thrust upon Thomas after the third game of the 1974 National Football League season when woody s owner Robert Irsay fired How- ard Schnellenbergcr and asked Thomas to take over. "This was a tough decision lo make from an emotional Thomas said, "because of the way the play- ers fought all year for me. It Leagues C.R. BOWL Sun Fun: Ron Goede 277-649. Mau- reen Slolbo 194, Deanna Haughenburv 513, The Gunlers 702-2023. TiC Jr. Boys: Bob Grulkev 195 SW, No. I 605, Touros 1632. Bantam No. I: Shane Posusta 167-434, Charlene Perel 143, Joyce Ortega 3.9, Kennedy Co. 477-1344. Bantam No. 2: Snane Posusta 1B3-320. Debbie Krohllng 128-222, winders Won- ders 464. 3 D's 867. His Hers: Skip Gllbertson 226-572. Dove Trlpo 226, Marlvs Stufen 189-499. 4 Splits 712, Mou Mous 1937. LEGION LANES Sot. Strikers: Charles Whlpple 254 663, Mary Stewart 194-555, World 739, Pin Splitters 2010. Dudes t. Domes: Flo Shoemaker 246. Marilyn Van Houten 525, Don McArlor 225, Jim Novak 225-640, Plnbusters 777, Pllellners ?07I. Sunday Mix Ups: Karen Pontius 181- 467, Peggy Schneider 181, Wes Beshears 2irt-5B5, Replacements 642, Sin Tight 1782. Brlles Bantams: Lori McArthur 150- 390, Mike Konler 170-417. Unpredldobles 708-1901. _ was a pleasure to work with Neighbor Schnoebelen Luckv Strike Bob Keene 204-545. Edith 194-481, Hot Shots 728, CASTLE LANES PD Marion Mixups: Judy Boebel 207- 511, Ron Helse 209, Roger Wheeler 536, 707-1962. Collins Cpuples: Dick Fredericks 212, Ron Koronda 529, Charlotte Miller 185- 494, Buckeyes 776, Steamrollers 2191. LANCER LANES Sat. Mixed Ten: Curt Gandv 234-53J- Morv Medulon 193-544, 865-2355. Lancer Doubles: Jim Pearson 212. Tom Kennedv 581. Linda Hohesy 209, Phyllis Herb 516, Pin Busters 651, Lucky 13 1877. Milky Way: Donna Hemonn 189, Marge Schmltz 455, Bob Gates 246-618, P.G.'s 727, Out Laws 1961. Bowlers Choice: Keith Henderson 225-613, Dottie WidOUt 222535, Happy Chef 718, McVov Const. 1944. Sunday Night Saints: Bob Camobcll b2S-571, Ramono Yiesley 210-529, Thirty Nlners 701-1970. Eagles Mixed: Dick Emanuel 212, C. J. Naaktgeboren 575, Edna Smith 173, Grace Knowles 455, Be Hvs Beauty 890- 2507. Little Four: Bob DeCombes- 229, Chuck Havel 503, Phvt Stolba 176-462, Fiirles 658-1814. The Lancelots: Jim Williams 201-586, Pennv Davis-Linda Nlschurti 197, Dor- lene Wagoner 502, Alley Oops 710, P.W.'s 1954. Sunday Night Leftovers: Pat Hcnder- shott 179-482, Bob Miller 224, Dean Win- lerowd 224-640. Luckv Strikers 673-1899. MAY CITY LANES His Hers: Edna Marlcle 199, Janet Miner 513, Dan Stcogall 210-588, AHick- Peoler 690, Prime Alls 1941. Sunday Niters: Larrv Stotler 222-556. Katie Brokaw 234-545, Hits Mrs. 721- 2080. May City Scamps: Steve Wise 148, JcH James 383, No. 4 492-1317. May City Pixies: Kim Longtllt 171- 418, No. 3 459, No. 5 1358. Mav City Scooters: Kirk Jeffords 154 40S, NO. 5 662, No. 2 1772. May Cltv Scorers: Craig Eostln 194, Sieve Oullrl 552, No. 7 693, No. 1 2040. Mav City Mixers: Dan King 191-521, No 3 749, No. 2 2114. 7th Niters: Dick Meier 223-630, Char- loHc Bceson 223-569, Mclcr-Bceson 825- 2143. Sot. Ron Marv Prochosko 578, Lelo Fllson 224- 542, F. H. 685-1943. Moose Mixed: Wes Martens 224-550, Noreen Phelps 198, Val Kopcckv 521, Four Doors 714-1946. Sot. Night PM's: Willie Sexton 2IJ- 510, Dixie McLoud 167, Morel Schotter 409. Gutter Busters 615-1722. Sat. Night Raiders: Chuck Ross 194, Rich Espe 524, Karen Ross 157-384, 4 Leal Clover 654 1750. Forty Stors: Jim Skola 236, Ed John son 562, Marclo Bough 183-484, Family Four 663, Sondbaggers 1929. Lads Lassies: Alberta Cameron 192, Dorothy Cooley 454, Clalr Cameron 190-533, Mundcl Long Luce Sullivan 642- 1845. 5.15 Socclol: Jonel Cole 225-569, Ken Nebluno 222, Ivon Fry 565, Cutler Dusters 792-2138. Haoov Couoles: Susie Petersen 232- 535. Roy Baker 210. George Trlbel 559, B. T. 730, Universal Climate Control 2011. them, and I'll never forget the way they responded under great adversity." The 53-year-nld Thomas, who had last worked as an as- sistant coach almost 20 years ago, said: "I didn't want to lannch a coaching career at this stage. If I stayed, it would only have been for one more year, anyway." The Colts lost first three games under, Schnellenberger and then went 2-9 under Thomas. But the team played well in almost every game, and many Colts expressed hope Thomas would return rather than face another turn- over in the coaching staff. "I think the players under- stand what it's all about now." Thomas said. "They have a positive attitude and there shouldn't be any prob- lem in the future. "If I had stayed, I would have retained the entire coaching staff. That decision will be left up to the new coach, but I'll strongly recom- mend that he retain them." Thomas said he had no par- ticular choice for the coaching job immediately in mind, but would prefer a person "who has had some pro experi- ence." "I'll have to sec who's inter- ested and who's he said, "and then talk with them. I haven't set a target date, but I'll get it done as soon as possible." Thomas is in Miami to ob- serve the Orange Bowl clash Wednesday night between Ala- bama and Notre Dame. He'll travel next to the All-Ameri- can Bowl in Tampa, Fla., and the Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala., with other stops at the Pro Bowl and the Super Bowl prior to the college draft. Mr. Friencfly's Fix-it Formulas Heck Gosling ELECTRIC DRILL (A ONE-TOOL SHOP) The most useful power tool you can buy is a good Rockwell ELECTRIC DRILL. Although it's called a drill it can, with it's many attachments, perform many jobs. Some tasks mat are versatile Vt" drill will handle are: drilling holes in wood or metal, sawing wood pr metal, grinding, honing, chiseling, driving screws, hammering, buffing, polishing sanding, and wire brushing, and with carbide-tipped drills you can drill in concrete and masonry. Two stands that are of real value are: One that holds the drill in a horizontal position for use of a grinder, polisher, etc.; the other, a vertical stand that allows the drill to be used as a drill press. The "HWI FRIENDLY ONES" at SUBURBAN LUMBER CO. handle the complete line of Rockwell ELEC- TRIC DRILLS. Wo havo the economy Rockwell drill and variable spend drills and drill kits as woll. Also Circular Saws, Jig Saws, Orbital Sanders and YOU NAME IT (IF WE HAVEN'T GOT IT, WE'LL GET IT FOR YOU.) HILPnjl HINT! Keep your drill clean and dutt free (your drill power unit i. more likely to be damaged by dust than and lubricate ac- cording lo the maintenance manual. _ ___ ____ ,u tiNiinrvnance manual SUBURBAN   

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