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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 24, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 24, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Big George! Virgil Partch "OK if I light ii lillle For Better Health New Dental Appliance Is Giving Relief By Dr. SX. Andelman If you're one of the many dental patients suffering from jaw hinge joints thai don'I function properly, help may be on the way. A University of Illinois den- tal scientist reporls that a new type of fluid-bearing dental appliance is bringing help lo patients who have wandered from dentist to dentist seeking relief from the jaw problem known scientifically as tempo- romandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Symptoms include pain or tenderness, limiled movement in the lower jaw and restric- tions in opening the mouth. Testing The new appliance was lest- ed on 22 palienls ranging in age from 23 to 60. Some of the palienls wore complete den- lures while others wore par- tial dentures or still retained a good portion of their natural dental structure. The fluid-bearing device is called a hydrostatic appliance and consists of a thin, flexible- walled, H-shaped fluid-bearing cell. Treatment is administered in two stages. First, the appli- ance is worn between the up- WIN AT BRIDGE By Oswald .lames .lacoby North growled, "1 guess your limit is one good play lo a hand." "What do you asked South. "I guarded against the four-two trump break. Could I help it if both minor suits failed to The answer to Soulh's ques- tion is lhal not only could he have guarded against those breaks; he should have guard- ed against them. The defense had started with three rounds of hearts. South had discarded a club on the third heart lead, whereup- on East had shifted lo Ihe jack of clubs. South won in dum- my; drew trumps and smiled when he found lhat they had broken 4-2. He didn't smile for long when he could only add two diamonds and three clubs to his four trumps for down one. Soulh would have made Ihe hand if he had gone afler a fifth trump Irick. lie should have played just one trump. Three diamonds would come next wllh dummy's ace of Irumps ruffing the third one. That would have been Soulh's second good play and lhal e.xlra Irump Irick would have allowed him In score game and rubber NORTH (D) 'a A42 f 854 K7 AKQ62 WEST EAST 9853 76 9 7 3 V A K Q ,1 fi Q 10 8 3 52 75 SOUTH K Q .110 f 102 4 A.I 96 4 484 Both vulnerable West North East South 14 IT Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass Opening The bidding has been: 24 West North East South 14 Pass 14 Pass You, South, hold: 764 3 2 K 7 32 What do you do now? one spade. What else'.' TODAY'S QUESTION Your partner continues to one notrump. What do you do now? Answer Tomorrow Coat of Arms 'The coat of arms was origi- nally a coat of silk or linen used to protect a knight's ar- mor from Ihe heat of the sun or from rust and dirt. It was colorfully embroidered wilh Ihe distinguishing emblem of Ihe wearer. to all our wonderful patrons! We wish you the best of everything! A-1 ELECTRIC 372.1 Center Point Rmul, Nt The Investor's Guide The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Tues., Dec. 24, W-t j MARMADUKE By Anderson Uemlng Dr. Andelman per and lower back leelh at exercise sessions at the den-x list's office. This permits the facial muscles to help reposi- tion the jaw, eliminating one painful discomfort of TM.I problems. Second Stage The s'eeond stage is for long-term relief and involves developing a balanced bite- correcting appliance to main- tain .the muscle relaxation achieved during stage one of treatment. The new appliance offers great promise for people suf- fering from this dental prob- lem, but Dr. Martin Lerman, the researcher, cautions that his work is still In the re- search stage. "Procedures are being developed to make the appliance generally avail- Dr. Lerman says, but it is not yet available for general clinical use. Dr. Andelnian welcomes let- ters outlining problems he may discuss in future columns. Ho regrets, however, he cannot personally answer mall. Write to him in care of The Gazette. Hy Sam Shulsl.v I'm niystlllfd by thr qn.lcs I read M treasury bills. They seem to bear little relationship lo dollar prices, and Ihe yields given don't agree with what I am able to figure as Hie return on my money. A Thill's very likely. One of the reasons Is that treasury bill markets are quot- ed on a "bank discount which Is computed by a com- plicated formula based on a DHO-day year, among other fac- tors. This will vary slightly from the actual coupon yield, which is to my way of thinking a better way for Ihe unli- nary investor to figure Ihe financial reward he gets from a purchase of treasury bills. (Hy ordinary investor I mean spe- cifically Hie small investor who can buy the minimum amount In which these bills are issued. Generally, the trades in this market are in the hundreds of thousands and millions, since "T-bills" are used mainly by professional money man- agers who have large amounts of money lo employ for any period from a week to a year.) The actual coupon yield to you the investor is a trifle higher than the bank discount yield usually given in the listings. For example, as this is written, a three- month bill is shown as yielding 7.811 percent on a bank discount basis, but really yielding the investor (on a "coupon" yield) 7.811 per- cent. Since dollar prices are not quoted the bills are traded among dealers on the bank discount basis Ihe only way you can fig- ure your yield with any accuracy is to get the dollar price of Ihe bill, usually at the time of issue. For example, a recent issue of another three-month bill was auctioned at an average price of 98.078, or for face value of bills. What is your actual return on.such an investment? In three months you will receive for what cost you call it So your gain will be That divided by your approximate cost, works out to a return of 1.9575, but since that is achieved in only three months, you multiply that figure by four to gel Ihe an- nual rate, which turns out to be 7.8386 percent, which is still, admittedly, an approximation. However, if you said your investment in that particular treasury bill will earn you 7.84 percent on your investment you couldn't be sued for libel. Follow-up tn A recent column about what happens when a company decides to buy in its publicly- held stock stressed the fact lhat the shareholder often has III- lle protection. I'm happy lo note that there may be some changes or, at least, official pressure exerted on the side of Ihe shareholder. In an address at Notre Oame, Securities and Kxchange Commissioner A. A. Sommer said thai public companies re- purchasing their slock in order to "go private" and escape federal regulations are inviting prosecution on fraud charges. The growing practice, he suggested, of out inlnori- (y shareholders by cash lender offers, cash mergers or re- verse spills was both unethical and illegal since, "when a corporation chooses to lap public sources of money (by offer- ing stock to the public) it makes a commilmenl lhat. willmiil the most compelling business justification, management and those in control will do nothing to interfere with Ihe liquidity of the public investment or the protection afforded the public by the federal securities laws." He asked: "Is there not a clear conflict of Interest when shareholders are offered the empty choice of tendering or being forced out one way or another while (lie conlrolling shareholders reap To which I can only add and may the SKC has- ten the much-needed protection for the small shareholder. Sam Shulsky I have 8 shares of a hank slock at Sllli per share, but a broker would offer me only for them. And a bank would lend me only on (hem. Why. A Having not (he slightest clue as, to the name of the bank, I can't even attempt lo check the market. Is the price you paid? Or is it a current quote? If it is, that bid by a broker is unrealistic. I'm inclined to believe that the market is substantially above otherwise the bank would not be prepared to lend you Forty-eight shares at 21 comes to only and il isn't likely the bank would lend as much as on lhat. Why not lalk to the bank itself? It must have a pretty good idea of the current market if it wants to lend you on Ihe stock. Mr. Shulskv welcomes written auesllons, but tie will he able lo nrovlde answers only through the column. For on annuities, please include a sett- addressed, slamned etwelooe. Address vour reauesls lo Sam Shulsky. core ot The Gazette. U Thant Becomes Symbol of Violence By Phil Ncwsom UPI Foreign News Analyst In life, as secretary general of the United Nations for Id years, U Thant stood as a symbol of the world's search for peace. In death, in his own country, he suddenly became a symbol of violence. There ws no love lost be-, twcen Thant and Burmese President Ne Win, and the sentiment carried over in the government's decision lhat Thant should be buried in a public cemetery instead of in the shadow of the sacred Schwedagon pagoda as his family had asked. The decision touched off vi- olent anil-government demon- strations among Burma's Buddhist monks and Buddhist youth in which, according to government figures, nine per- sons were killed by gunfire of government troops. Other re- ports put the dead at perhaps fifty or more. Await Sentencing More than persons dis- appeared from the streets of Rangoon, presumably into jails lo await sentencing to lerms of three years or more. Politically, Thant had been an ally of and personally was not unlike former Burmese Premier U Nu, a poet and deeply religious philosopher who had served as Burma's first premier afler indepen- dence in 1948. Except for brief periods, Nu remained premier from 1947 until his final ouster by Ne Win in Thant went on to become U. N. secretary general but sel- dom returned home. Both men retained their popularity among Burmese Buddhists who make up about 85 percent of Burma's popula- tion of 30 million, and this is what led to the wave of indig- nation which followed the government decision to relegate Thant's body to the ignominy of a public cemetery. Mediocre Government From independence onward, Burma, a land of potential riches, has sufferd from me- diocre government. U Nu, a dreamer, had no talent for administration and under him Burma drifted to- ward anarchy and civil war. Ne Win pledged his govern- ment to find a "Burmese way to and began by banks, most large industry and many small private enterprises. His military government ex- propriated businesses run by local Indians and Chinese and ended U. S. aid programs and cultural exchanges. Gradually, the country drift- ed into isolation and a steadily lowering standard of living. Once Ihe world's largest ex- porter of rice, this year's rice exports are expected to fall to zero. Because Burma's export business has stagnated, the government has no money lo buy raw materials and repairs for industrial machinery. Smugglers and the black market do a thriving business. Sheer necessity has forced the government lo deal with foreign concerns in explora- tion for offshore oil and ex- ploitation of its mineral wealth. Ne Win himself speaks frankly of the country's eco- nomic problem and admits that government attempts to find a solution only has made il worse. Despite obvious unrest (here is no sign Ihe government is about til topple so long as it retains support of the army. Colleges Face Enrollment Drops NEW YORK (AP) College enrollment declines in the next decade could result in the wholesale closing of private institutions and the consolidation of state-supported campuses, officials in some states say. The population swell produced by the post-World war II baby boom will push nationwide enrollment from a record 10.1 million this year to a high of 10.8 million in 1980, according to the National Center for Educational Statistics, a federal agency. But the passing through of the baby-boom group, combined with declining birth rates and other trends, will produce enrollments substantially below present levels in some states during the 1980s. There are curreitly stideits stale university, state college and community college campuses. Officials predict a combined enrollment of in 1990. "We will have some hard decisions to said Richard Hawk, director of the Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Commission. Pnjectins by Ike New stale department indicate a decline in full-time undergraduate enrollment from this year to in 1980, a drop of 23 percent. Of- ficials said it could result in the closing of 80 of the 120 private colleges in the state. New Jersey's department higher edicatUn estimated fall enrollment this year at The department said it expected a peak of in 1980 and then decline to in 1990. The students college campuses in will increase to in 1979, according to a report prepared for the State Board ot Regents. Statewide enrollment will then fall to In 1984 and there will be only college students in Ohio by 1989, the report said. "I look for the public institutions to continue, but some of them will be said Ronald Thompson, a former Ohio State university registrar who prepared the report. "It's an economic reality" that some private colleges will close, he added. After a decade of booming expansion, even those states not forecasting actual enrollment declines can look forward only to relatively small campus growth in the years to come. In projections made last year, California officials said un- dergraduate enrollment on the state's public campuses would increase from to in the 10 years to 1983, a gain of just more than 1 percent a year. Enrollment forecasts, of course, have not always proved infallible. A 1.3 percent increase in college attendance had been predicted for this year. The actual increase 5.7 percent pushed national enrollment over 10 million for the first time in history. College officials said the poor job market caused more young people than expected to stay in school. The nationwide enrollment projections made by the Na- tional Center of Educational Statistics extend to 1983. After peaking at 10.8 million in 1980, the center predicts enrollment will drop to 10.6 million in 1983. The chief of the center's projection branch, W. Vance Grant, said further declines in the years after that could bring national college enrollment in two decades down to less than this year's enrollment. By comparison, enrollment on the nation's university, college and junior college campuses doubled in the last decade, as it had doubled in the decade before that. The reversal in recent years of two historic trends has caused additional concern for educators looking ahead: After rising decades, the percentage Ihe nation's 18-year-olds graduating from high school has been established at about 75 percent since 1969. The U.S. ling had an Increasing proportlen of its young people going to college from 1.7 percent in 1869-70 lo 50.3 percent in 1969. It has been going down since then. Last year, 43 percent of the nation's 18- and 19-year-olds were in college. College presidents and treasurers hope that this fall's record enrollment might be the beginning of a much-needed reversal in these recent trends. Id us STEP inlo your home with Qreetiif for the Holiday Svnmni iWWFCONCKKTKIMWIHICTS Phone MM251 E Avenue NE IMUHMMMMMMMKMIMMMMlilil VISIT The Office of Dr. C. R. Kitchen Optometrist Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted Contact Lenses By appointment only 395-6256 Closed Sun. and Mon, Lindale Plaza "This isn't really a dinner bell. Oregon Folk Approve Pot Penalty Reduction WASHINGTON A majority of Oregonians ap- prove of their state law that reduces the penalty for pos- sessing a small amount of marijuana to that of a parking ticket, a survey shows. The survey, commissioned by the independent, Washing- ton-based Drug Abuse Coun- cil, was taken a year after Or- egon became the first state to reduce penalties for posses- sion of up to one ounce of marijuana from a criminal to a civil offense. Convictions carry a maximum fine of but no criminal record or jail term. The survey also indicated there was no significant in- crease in marijuana use after the criminal penalties were dropped. It showed that, although 52 percent of the persons inter- viewed showed no change in how much they smoke, 40 per- cent of those currently using marijuana reported a de- crease in usage. Health Danger Of those who slopped using marijuana or never used it, 23 percent cited a possible health danger as a reason while 4 percent muntionc'd Ihe possi- bility of legal prosecution. Two years ago, the federal government's National Com mission on Marijuana am Drug Abuse estimated lhat 2h million Americans have tried marijuana and thai eight mil- lion used it regularly. Oregon became the only state lo adopt the commission recommenda- tion'to reduce criminal penal- lies for possession of an ounce or less. "On the slate level, there's been great confusion between Ihe medical and legal debates about said Rob- ert Carr, a program officer for LAFF A DAY the Drug Abuse Council. "There is increasing evidence thai it may be harmful to use il. But we're claiming it is no more harmful than alcohol, to- bacco or caffinc." Carr said the possibility of reducing penalties for mari- juana possession is being studied by other stales, in- cluding Minnesota, Vermont, Massachusetts and Washing- ton. All Ineffective "The importance of the sur- voy is (hat many ponpln nn :ill levels have predicted that re- ducing the penalties will in- crease usage of Carr said. "But legal deter- rents everywhere have been ineffective in reducing Ihe amount people smoke." The council said the survey consisted of personal inter- views with adults 18 or older, "representing a balanced sample of the state's popula- tion." Of those surveyed, 112 per- cent favored the existing law, 15 percent said possession of small amounts of marijuana should be legal and 11 percent said sale and possession of uniall mnaunts should he le- gal. "Nobody said I was a genius when I bent our fender like that." Good to all men. on birthday of our Lord and Savlorl WITWER INSURANCE 701 MNB Phone 362-3030 Here, beneath Hit lamplight's glow, we gather to joyously sing out, To you and all ihost you hold dtar, a holiday filled with lots of chttrl APPLIANCE SPECIALTIES CORPORATION 5519 CENTER PT. RD. NE _________________Phon. 393-2916-------------------   

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