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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 13, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Ctdar Rapids Gmelle: Fit. Dye. 13, 'Mrs. Jolly K1 Fights Child Abuse By I'am Jagcrson Parents Anonymous (PA) is a national organzatiiin de- signed to prevent child abuse by helping the child abuser..II was founded four years ago in California by a woman who calls herself "Mrs. Jolly Since then, the organization has grown to Include nearly 120 chapters and over mem- bers. In a day-long seminar conducted Thursday at the YWCA, Mrs. K explained her reason for organizing Parents Anony- mous. "I was a child she said. "On several occasions 1 nearly killed my youngest daughter. She was my whipping post though I didn't realize it at the time." What Mrs. K did realize was that she had a severe problem. In an effort to save both her daughter and herself, she aked for help from several social service workers in nine local and county agencies in California. All her efforts were futile social service workers were just too overloaded to give her immediate attention. "Finally, I got lo talk to a psychiatric social worker." Mrs. K continued. "I complained so much about Ihe lack of treatment available that he challenged me to do something about it. That's how PA got started." Basic Principle Parents Anonymous was developed on the same basic principle as Alcoholics Anonymous. As with AA, members believe they have a common problem and that realizing their problem is the first step in combating it. Group discussion is the therapy utilized by the members. PA members retain an- onymity by revealing to one another only their first names. According to Mrs. K, there are several reasons for be- coming a child abuser: Social, personal, emotional or envi- ronmental pressures, parental frustrations und the inabilty to cope with and handle anger are jusl a few. "For some reason a person becomes totally frustrated and unfortunately, child abuse becomes a way to vent this frustration." Environmental and emotional circumstances arc partial- ly responsible frustration Mrs. K developed. She has had the opportunity for only a fifth grade education. She was raped when she was 11 years old, lived in 32 institutions and ,17 foster homes. She has experienced two bad marriages. In conclusion, Mrs. K emphasized (he importance of group therapy in overcoming this problem. "1 don't get a secret thrill out of going around and telling everyone 1 was a child she said. "But to deal with this problem, it has lo be brought out into the open. It is not easy to stand up in front of people and say the things I say. But 1 do it and 1 always hope that one word, one phrase, will reach someone who needs help." Local Chaptt ers Locally, there are two chapters of PA one that meets at night and one that meets during the day. These chapters were started last summer by "Cindy" after she'd found her- self in a situation similar to Mrs. K's. "It was Cindy said. "I was lo the point where I'd take my daughter by the shoulders and pound her head to Ihe floor. All the while I'd be crying and saying, 'I love you, I love you.' "I tried to get help but no luck. Finally, a protective service worker put me onto PA. I helped found this chapter last summer and at this time, we're just starting lo get close. We're just starting to get better." For further information about the local chapter of Par- ents Anonymous call, 366-5625. Mrs. Jolly K I I Gazette photo bv John Mclvor I I Navy May Beach First Women at Sea By Fred S. Huffman WASHINGTON (AP) The navy's first seagoing women suilors apparently will be beached next year because the navy plans to take the hospital ship Sanctuary out of commission. probably by spring. Officials say there is no other active navy ship lo which women can be assigned under the law. Acknowledging that the navy plans to retire the Sanc- tuary, the Pentagon said the move stems from "budgetary reasons." The move also raises the question whether the navy intends to carry out Its plan to station an aircraft carrier in Greece. Pilot Program Navy officals stressed they are far from disappointed with the performance of women who have served on the crew of the hospital ship since the pilot program was started two Society for Women Features Diet Suggestions Dolls, Dolls, Dolls Members of the Jaycee Wives club have fun "remembering when" as they work on their Christmas toy project dressing dolls. From left, are co-chairmen of the project, Mrs. Robert Doll, 274 Brentwood place NE, and Mrs. Scott Ovel, 2081 Linn boulevard SE. Other members at the table are, from left, Mrs. Paul Black, 221 1 Kenrich drive SW, and Mrs. Kenneth Pettit, 6118 Under- wood drive SW. Mrs. Doll was hostess Thursday for the club's work meeting. Ann Sever, Fiance, Honored One 'Doing Well' Bridal parties this week are honoring Miss Ann Frances Bever and her fiance, Glen W. Harvey III. Miss Bever, daughter of the James D. Bcvers of 617 N. Property lane SE, and Mr. Harvey will be married Saturday. Mr. Harvey is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Glen W. Harvey, jr., 3750 Cottage Grove avenue SE. Dinner parties were given Monday and Tuesday. The first, also honoring Mr. Harvey on his birthday, was given by Mr. and Mrs. Wil- liam P. Ellwood in their homo at 3845 Indiandale circle SE. Hosts for the Tuesday party were Mr. and Mrs. John B. Turner II of 530 Knollwood drive SE. On Wednesday, Mrs. Newell Ingle and Mrs. William Francy honored Ihe bride- elect at a punch party given at the Cedar Rapids Country club. A group gift was given. Miss Bever also was feted Thursday with a luncheon and Christmas tree gift shower given by Mrs. Henry H. Ham- ilton of 127 Cottage Grove ave- nue SE. Candle Caution Never use lighted candles near any evergreen decora- tions. SAN JOSE, Calif. (UPI) Mrs. Charlotte Lange held her fragile daughter, Jolene, the healthiest of her three surviv- ing sextuplets, in her arms for the first time Thursday. Jolene is doing well at Valley Medical center without respiratory support while her two surviving brothers, Brian and Jason, are in serious condition with continuing de- terioration of their respiratory system. Mrs. Lange, 26, who had taken a fertility drug, gave birth lo six babies Sunday. Each of the infants weighed slightly more lhan two pounds at birth. By Timothy Harper MADISON, Wis. (AP) U you're eating too much meat or not enough asparagus and don't know it, the University' of Wisconsin's computer has some advice for you. University researchers have programmed the campus com- puter to tell you what to cat. Under the program, people fill out computer cards of ev- erything they eat for a day or even a week, says Prof. Nancy Johnson, university nutrition- ist. Digests Data The data is fed into the computer, digested and then returned to the subject with percentages of various common nutrients in the diet for that day or week. "From this Information, we can then loll the person what he 'needs more or less said Mrs. Johnson. "We are very specific." For example, she will check the computer's assessment of the person's diet and then rec- ommend more asparagus, less meat or other changes in the Individual's eating habits. "We do this with an eye to- ward the she said. "Many people eat more meat lhan they need, so we tell them to cut down and spend their money on other less expensive foods they need. When people are short on Vitamin C, we'll often tell them to cat more cabbage because it's a cheap source of Vitamin C." She said the computer's calculations are based on rec- ommended daily intakes of a dozen nutrients, taking into account the person's age and sex. Lower Cost "If we were going to be very exact, we would have to take into account the height and weight and other Mrs. Johnson said. "But we can't do that because the cost would be prohibitive." She said the computer can analyze a person's diet for about 10 cents a day, while it would cost about for a hu- man nutrition analyst lo do the same thing. She said the program is aimed primarily at university research, but has been opened lo the public. "Anybody can do she said. "So far we've had about or diets run through." Mrs. Nelson said she ex- pects computer diet analysis to become more popular throughout the country in Ihe future. jrS g They said no major problems developed while as many as 69 women officers and enlisted personnel lived and worked among more than 400 males aboard the ship. At one point last year, navy sources said there had been several shipboard romances and one possible wedding was budding between a radiowoman and a machinist's mate. Also a young woman had learned she was pregnant and was transferred ashore after only a month aboard. The navy said at the time that the unmarried enlisted woman became pregnant before joining the crew. A total of 19 officers and 97 enlisted women have served since 1972 aboard'Ihe Sanctuary, now based at Mayport, Fla. In-addition to nurses and hospital corps women, Ihe wom- en's contingent has included signal and radar specialists, clerks, hull technicians, supply officers and boswam mates. No Women Midshipmen The senior woman officer now assigned to the Sanctuary, LI. Susan Canfield, has been chosen for promotion lo lieu- tenant commander and will teach navigation al the U. S. Naval Academy, where women still are excluded as midship- men. The other navy women now serving with the hospital ship also will be shifted to shore billets. Although officials declined to discuss other implications of the Sanctuary's retirement, the move raises a question whether the United States may change its mind about basing an aircraft carrier in Greece. It is known thai Ihe Sancluary was to have been sent lo Greece to provide medical services for thousands of carrier crewmen and their families who would be expected to live there under the navy's "homeporting" program. The woman-at-sea program was one of a series of innova- lions put Into effect by Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt when he was chief of naval operations. Adm. James L. Holloway, who succeeded Zumwalt last summer, has started easing back on some of the innovations. But officials say Holloway intends lo push ahead with efforts to attract more women to naval service. Bridge Bob's Club The club championship will be hdd at Ihe YWCA Salurday at 1S30 and at Wednes- day. It's On MgM Big Holiday Salo favfcifs 9300 to 91OOOI C.R. PIANO A ORGAN 110 3rd Ave. SW BALDWIN 1838 Wreaths Cyclamen Krebs 2121 18ili St. SW HENRY R. EK CortHled Kitchen Designer Price We design to your budget Steel Wood Formica KITCHENS BY FRIEDL Serving Eastorn fawa 1013 with Seiko Accutron Watches For HER Christmas SLIPS VANITY FAIR and ChooM the clanic embroidered slip at or (tie of Laurel Leaf design ot Antl-cling fabrics in short and average lengths 32 to 42. FREE GIFT WRAP AT MARTIN'S 3ml Floor TREES TES TREES Kingston Stadium Hundreds of trees standing for your inspection Optimist Club Lot All proceeds to year-round Optimist Youth Activities Optimist Volunteers on hand to serve you. Tonight 'Til 9 Sat.-Sun. 9 to 9 You ro to find a h-M to fit Your Budgo'l Wuk 10a.m. to 9   

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