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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1974 - Page 32

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Tte' Ctdur Sn., 8, H74 .V! Center Point Youth Learns French School Life and her son, Jared; ore spend- ing mis year in Bordeaux, France, where she is teaching English in a French She is the wife of me Rev. Dwoyne United Methodist minis- ter ot Center Point. By Nadtnc Madsen BORDEAUX, France Communication between Bor- deaux, France, and Center Point, Iowa, is difficult and limited. That's what this writer found out when I tried io send back information about my son's life as a student at a French elementary school. there is a strike-of postal workers, so mail is hot'being delivered. Letters sent to the U.S. started returning about a month.ago. The telephone and telegraph in Franco are in the same department as the mail service, so information and service operators are not working, either. The telephone can be used by. direct-dialing: only. And that's how this story arrived in the U.S. by a direct phone call to Center Point. Despite Inflation Jared Madsen, six-year-old son of the Rev. and Mrs. Dwayne Madsen of Center Point, sits outside the school he attends this year while Mrs. teaches English in a French school. Jared is jquickly learning the language as his teacher speaks .only French in the classroom. Life goes on in a fairly normal manner, despite inflation and shortages. The French use less heat and wear more clo- thing in winter than most Americans. Most of them have bicycles or motor bikes to save on petrol, which is three times as expensive as in the U.o, Jared, my six-year-old son, attends a French elementary schoo] in downtown Bordeaux. Each morning, except Wednes- day and Sunday when there is no school, he and I take a bus at 8 a.m. to get him there by a.m. French schools are similar to American schools in many ways. The bright rooms are pleasantly decorated with sam- ples of the children's work. The children could be mistaken for a group entering an American school, except for their chattering in French. Many Differences There are differences, however, and In some ways the schools seem much like American schools 20 years ago. Tile first person one meets in a French school is Ilia Her duties Include welcoming the students, helping with wraps, taking lunch money, supervising Ihe students on Ihe playground, serving lunch, and anything else the director requests. The concierge need not bo a certified teacher, nor even a graduate of high school. She is n mother-substitute to the children, and as such is an important part of the school system. The center of the school administration is "Madame la Directricc" who is much like an old-style American prin- cipal. Also a Teacher Although the school is large and Ihe faculty requires a grout deal of administration by the director, she also leaches. She is constantly on the. move, and her loud, forceful voice seems to be everywhere in the halls and offices. Jared attends this school because it has a class for for- eign students. He is the only American in a class of about 20 children from foreign countries. Two Scoltish brothers are the only others in the class who speak any English. The teacher refuses.to speak anything'but French, al- though she knows a bit of several other languages. The children begin arriving at the school about a.m. The school, with its front doors almost at Ihe edge of the curb, seems lightly pressed by the tail buildings all around it. The few children who will stay at school for lunch can be readily spotted. Each is clutching a piece of bread about six inches long, along with books and satchels. Bread is never wrapped in France. Greets Children The concierge receives the lunch money from those who will stay at school for lunch. She greets most of the children by name as she sends them on. to their classrooms. Many French schools are still quite formal compared to American schools, especially if the director is older and the teachers are used to an older system. Basic skills of reading, writing and arithmetic are the most important part of French education, and there is little emphasis on music, art, or athletics. The children ure bused weekly Io a gymnasium for physi- cal education, and to a swimming pool for swimming 'lessons. Short Recess The morning Is broken by a short recess. The noisy children spend most'of the time running in the small play- ground. The heavy shade of the trees keeps the sun from breaking through and makes the playground seem dreary. At noon, the school erupts with noisy children and teach- ers hurrying home for lunch. About 25 children remain at scliool'for Ihe lunch prepared and served by the concierge, it costs the children about 80 cents a day. Lunch begins with the children finding- their napkins on which they placed their bread in the morning. A tasty and well-seasoned soup of pottage is served first. This may be a clear potato soup or a kind of barley soup. Next, they are given pate, or a meat spread, Io eat on their bread. A meat course of mutton, pork, or beef follows. This is followed by a vegetable, sometimes cooked in a casserole, liberally covered with melted cheese. A green salad is often served to the children next. Then a dessert, such as pudding, a pastry, or fresh fruit. Afternoon Activities After lunch, the children are faced with filling the rest of the two-hour long lunch period'with When weather permits, they play in the court yard, but when it is raining they must remain in the building under the watchful eye of the concierge. The classes resume at 2 p.m. and lasl until wtleh :school is out for the day. There is no school on Wednesday, and only until noon on Saturday. When Jared runs from his classroom to the entrance of the school where I wait for him, he is clutching something he has made that day. Though the French schools are different from American schools, they are excellent in many ways. There is obviously not as much money to build or equip the schools as there is in America. Little is spent on things not directly lied to learning the basic skills. Everything seems to be directed toward passing the slate tests for graduation later on. But the dedicated, loving teacher is the key In good ed- ucation in France, as well as in America. Will Plow 'Corridor' Roads 't MARENGO Only "cor- ridor" roads' in' Iowa county jiyill have snow plowed on ,them when county, crews are forced to work on weekends or Otherwise require them to be paid overtime. The new program is ex- tremely tentative, the super- visors emphasized, and the roads actually to be plowed on the so-called "snow routes" are still subject to some revi- sion. However, county engineer Word S. Sprensen said that.at least at the beginning this will be primarily the farm-to-, inarket highways in the Bounty. This includes not only those that are paved such as the IWV, C-road, Black Diamond, and M-road to Mill- "prsburg, but also the num- bered gravel roads in the county. Sorensen presented the fig-. tires that show the tremendous costs to the county of snow re- moval, and the reason the Supervisors want to stay away from as much overtime work as possible in this category. The engineer said that straight time for snow, remov- al costs about an hour from the time the snow re- moval begins presumably with maximum forces on 'the road. He said this provides for eight road patrols and six (rucks. However, any time the .Luther Students Will. Present Dr. Seuss Stories group of Lu- ther college students will bring several Dr. Seuss favori- ties to children in area schools Ihis week. The.children's holiday pro- duction is a presentation in dance, mime and music of the Dr. Seuss stories "Green "The "Harlequin and Gift of Many and "The The troupe will perform Monday at a.m. at Dor- chester elementary and at 1 in West Elementary in Waukon, and Tuesday at East Elemen- tary in Waukon at and at 1 in Waterville elementary. On Saturday two perform- ances will be given for the Decorah and Luther communi- ty, at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the Storre speech and theater puilding adjacant to the Dike parking lot. Also on that day 1 p.m the troupe will give a Special performance for the .CamCar children's Christmas workers get beyond 40 hours a week and they must work their regular eight hours a day, five days a week this hourly figure goes up by 50 percent under the federal wage and hour law and also the secondary road depart- ment's recently negotiated contract with its employes. Sorensen said the county crews plowed snow last Satur- day; but not Sunday, finishing the job Monday in opening the roads. He said some work remained Tuesday in blading snow off into the ditch and other odds and ends. fMSUUSf Cedar Emergency Numbers Ambulance .___ 366-7654 F.B.I. fire 398-5343 Highway Patrol 364-517! After Hourj 363-5629 Police 398-5353 Sheriff......! 7 398-3521 Medical Society 365-2527 (If you have no physician) Foundation II 362-2174 (Criiii help, I Information, Referral 398-3955 (To born who con help) (Gip ond carry in your billfold} give the gift that opens automatically hristmas automatic er system ALLIANCE Christmas gift! Genie opens ths door, turns on the light, closes the door, then locks up tight. SWEET DOOR COMPANY OVERHEAD DOORS and OPENERS Open 8 to 5 Monday through Friday; 9 to 12 Saturday 120 COUINS ROAD SI 477 1 1 (EAST OF TOWN HOUSE) 01 I I 94 I The ALLIANCE lUimfMtMriiic Co., Inc. A MHJMI MIIKKAS Mill IPS OMI'AM' Mttn il lit limm ruuii-nnu' "JV'i IHW Calti iimrl' Heavy-duty Power Tools Your Choice 219 95 Sale Ends Wed. P.M. Save 850! 10-inch Radial Arm Saw Regular Motor develops maximum 2-HP. Convenient work function chart on arm push-pull switch. Manual brake. Up front control. Save 10-inch Bench Saw Combination Regular Sep. Prices Total 278.95. Includes motor breat for the home workshop or small Shop With' Ex- act-I-Cut feature. Partially assembled. Extension Ex- ITS. Craftsman 8-snl. Vac Regular JW..17 45" Picks up both wcl und dry spills. Polypropylene rnsn rewists trucking, (Innling. 18-Oal. Shnp Vac rrvio Rccnlar m.m OV Craftsman lionrh Vise Krgnlar J2I.SS Heavy duty. Built.in, re- pljiceiilde pipe jnws. Swivel Imse. Irtrjje anvil horn. Craftsman Variable- speed Drill Press RfKidar WS M Handy %.in. drill prew develops mnxiiuum IIP, 0-2000 rpm no load Save All-purpose Work- bench with 1-in. Top flan a Credit Plan to Suit Most Evv.ry 2v5-ft. cliip lifinrd top IR 1-in. thick. 16-gnngo Htftel frnnlo lor Blrcnulli. Unamniililcd. Additional Draurr llrgilar K.M a, SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVK SatiKfarlinn Giiarnnlrrd or Your Money k SKARS, ROEBUCK AND co. .STOKE HOURS SUNDAY Noon to 5p.m. MON: through FRI. a.m.4 p.m. SATURDAY a.m.-SiM p.m. A Value Craftsman HP Grinder Scars' Price Split plinrr motor develops HI'M iio-lond lvr. mnniMilly umlnl linll Sale Eml.H TIHW. 9 P.M. PHONE Ms-sjiw FREE PARKING MNDALE PLAZA CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA   

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