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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1974 - Page 31

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Political Notes By Frank Nve CH.r 8, Vacation for. Two Weeks and What hapZ? for. U'm lamakcc a ratheVpoor reception.' column. Those last two Gordon Gammuck and 1 uol acnualntoil in I.-.I., .______ ,u_.Pis.c.ouraged' hc. was aboul -leave, when he spotti eiJrt rt me: Should oTand JmlMh thcm? Or right out and admit they were the products of two guest column- WOULDSHAW Tslions- was so fluttered I DreoK" thc lwo been preceded by editor's notes naming the guest writers. Da'8 Kucter (of The Gazette staff) and Harrison Skip" Weber (of Iowa Dally Press Assn and thanks for two exceptionally fine columns. r" give 't lell my tta name on Reflections HAPPEN when a guy is on vacation. Clty'beat staie for nroH f C'are' lhe Democratic nomination lor president pro tempore of the Iowa senate 13 to 12 was that, at first, he considered rounding up Republican support to run against Minnette the second go around. After all, reasoned Joe, who served with Action committee back in 1957-61, he has been around the senate longer than any other member, Republican or Democrat, so seniority should entitle him to the honor of being president pro tern- pore. But Joe is a good Democrat and decided against that course of action. WhV Was maMnS such a thing of sen- ion y, which really doesn't count for much in the Iowa leg- islature, at a time when virtually every Democratic candidate for congress at the November election was demanding that seniority be done away with in Washington, where it does count for something. Don't comprehend how Joe could have made that seniori- ty claim count against Minnette anyway when it's obvious on the face that she is prettier and plays better tennis Then (here was (he story that Spiro Agnew, who left the vice-presidency in disgrace, reportedly is engaged in a couple of business deals that could make him a millionaire. So that's what it takes to make a mijlion, eh? Getting back to seniority what about the announcement by Iowa's retiring U.S. Sen. Harold Hughes that he won't re- sign before his term expires to give his successor, Congress- man John Culver, an advantage in the seniority department over 10 other senators-elect by being sworn in ahead of them? For many years it has been 'a questionable custom for retiring senators to give up their offices' before the end of their terms to give successors a' seniority break, especially if they belonged to the same political party, Hughes and Culver are Democrats. But Hughes has strong feelings about senators who use the resign early technique to perpetuate the seniority ad- vantage custom. He believes it is morally and constitutionally wrong. Anyway, when Hughes announced last year that he. planned to retire, from politics to enter religious work lie made it clear he would serve the remainder of his term God willing. I'm glad, admittedly for selfish reasons. When a senator or any public office-holder for that matter, resigns before completing his term it fouls up (1) record keepers, (2) payroll clerks and (3) ink-stained political scribes like me, who have enough trouble as it is keeping the public posted on who held what office for how long. More Reflections SOME REFLECTIONS ARE SOMBER ONES. Like those about two good friends leaving this life: former Des Moines Mayor Charles lies and Columnist Gordon Gammack of The Des Moines Register and Tribune. Chuck lies was a successful businessman and a dedicated public servant who symbolized what the forefathers had in mind when they founded this republic. It was their thought that every citizen, no matter how much he got wrapped up in money-making business enterprises, should devote some of his time and talents to public) service. Chuck lies did that and his city and state are the better for it. He always found time to be interested in your problems and in helping solve problems common to Des Moines and other cities. And to provide much needed informal ion to newshounds from other cities, as well as (hose in Des Moines Iowa State Sponsors World Affairs Institute on Vietnam Vietnamese government officials, journal- ists, educators, and former prisoners in Vietnam will be among the speakers partici- pating in the institute on world affairs at Iowa Slate university Monday through Friday. The institute will focus on "Indo-Chlna: What Kind of in a scries of presen- tations in the Memorial union. Included in the list of 15 speakers are John D. Finney, a member of the United States Foreign Service in Vietnam, Tran Van Dlnh, a former South Vietnamese government official; Sokhom Hlng, an authority on Cambodia and an Asian scholar; Don Luce, a journalist and agricultural expert; Ed Block, former AID official in Vietnam; and System Telephone MMI44 Ten (SEATS) In Cedar 3W-5605 Elsewhere m-m-SM4 James Scott, professor of pol- itical science, University of Wisconsin. Thc institute, open to the public without charge, is spon- sored by the ISU committee on lectures with funding from the government and student body. The program will include slide shows, panels, and lec- tures. Yule Thieves Market Will Be Held Dec. 15. IOWA CITY-Originnl works by both student and non-student artists will be sold at the Christmas Thieves Market to lie sponsored from 9 n.m. to 5 p.m. in thc Iowa Memorial union by the Fine Arts area of thc University Programming Service. About 210 booths will fea- ture the hand-crafted items, making this salo thc Inrgcst Thieves Market ever held at the U. of I. Works on snlc include tolos, prints, paintings, woodwork, sculpture, commies, textiles, leather floods and jewfllry. He left a high murk In public service for others to aim Gordon Gummuck and 1 got acquainted in the late Thir- ties when we covered the statchouse as friendly competitors. He was known as "Gam" In those days. Practical Jokes, such as hiding the other fellow's type- writer at deadline time, or feeding him fake news releases on some state official's stationery, always helped to inject a lit- tle zip into members of the press corps on dull news days. Gam and I were not above playing practical jokes so we sometimes collaborated in carrying them out. Our favorite victim was another lowly scribe who had a longer-than-usual nose for, news and who shall remain anony- mous. He was a real newshound. Even an obviously phony news tip would send him racing up more than 200 steps to the statehouso dome if he thought he'd get a story on arrival. So Gam and I would set him up. Gam would station him- self at one of the two. telephones in what was laughingly re- ferred.to.as a press box in those days. (Let it be said in pass- ing that what presently constitutes the statehoiise press room is referred to just as 1 would hunch down in a nearby telephone booth, out of sight to passers-by but where I could see the press box. We'd wait until Victim came to the press box lo type a story or to use the other phone. Then I'd spend a nickel (that's all it cost in those days) and call Gam in (he press box from my phone- booth. He'd answer with a cheery listen a few seconds and then shout: "What? NO. Not that. You say it just happened? I'll be right there. Thanks." With that he'd.bang down the receiver and dash away like frightened deer that had just spotted a hunter. Victim, a bit startled, would chase after him but Gam's headslart al- ways gave him time lo find a hiding place where he could watch Victim run past, full speed forward, not knowing where he was headed or why. This little prank worked fine until the day that Victim ran past Gam's hiding place, headlong into a domed good story thai both of us missed completely while engaged in uncontrollable laughter. Just proved once again that he who tillers tardiest has the most boisterous guffaw. Let it be recorded that this midterm mini-convention, Gam ever missed a story. More often than not, he was (here waiting for stories to happen. In the truest sense, ho was n reporter's reporter. -fr made by Gov. J. James Exon of Nebraska on thc panel that discussed Hural Life in Urban America. Exon Issued a new call for the resignation of Agriculture Secretary Earl on grounds that he isn't for fanners. Paraphrasing him "but without the Exon chided Bute for his unfortunate remark about (he Pope, saying; "He (Bute) doesn't play the farmer's game so he should not write the farmer's rules." it -ft Nothing Missed One of the many dignitaries was up there expounding on a charter convention' resolution when the noise level in the Kansas City auditorium made il almost impossible lo hear him. "Attention roared Democratic National Chair- man Robert Slrauss. "Anybody who hasn'l paid attention up to chimed in the speaker, "hasn't missed anything yet." lamakee county and getting a rather poor reception. Discouraged, he was about to leave, when he spotted three elderly gents sitting on a bench In the park. He went over and introduced himself as a candidate for congressman, without mentioning his political affiliation. The trio gave him a good reception. Then one of the sen- ior citizens, noting Culver hadn't given his party affiliation inquired whether he was a Republican or a Democrat. "I'm a Culver replied. The, old gent shook his head in utter disbelief comment- ing to his buddies- "You know, it's getting so when they srub 'em up you can't tell the Democrats from the Republicans." Wrong Impression Water Windmill Electoral College THERE WAS THIS GAZABO who wondered aloud whether the electoral college would have lost ils accreditation had Nixon been impeached. Butz No Playa Either Even on vacation a political reporter keeps his eye on what s happening, which explains why I hied to Kansas City e m.ne ended to see what the Democrats were up to !f reTdCd that "lis mini-convention', th Th a finds lhe tlGleealcs 'much re- man the quadrennial national conventions Best crack of the convention up to Friday nighl was BEFORE DISCARDING NOTEBOOKS crammed full of 1974 campaign noles, I culled them for left-over items that were overlooked or didn't make it into print before the elec- tion. They show that audiences usually respond when candi- dates tell stories on themselves. State Rep. David Stanley, Muscatine Republican, some- times told this one during his campaign against Congressman John Culver, Cedar Rapids Democrat, for U.S. senator: Seems Dave was running so dry one hot day he drank several glasses of water during a campaign appearance. First fellow up during the question period allowed he didn I want to ask anything; he just wanted to observe that "this is the firsl time in my life I've ever seen a windmill run on water." Good News and Bad CULVER ENJOYS TELLING this one on himself: When the Italian community of DCS Moines hosted Congressman Peter Rodino of New Jersey, one of their own, during the recent campaign, Culver was a guest at the In- ferno restaurant. 'An enthusiastic native of Italian descent grabbed Culver by the arm lo usher him into the 'dining room, all the while exclaiming: "Youva gotta it made, youva gotta it "I hope Culver responded. Whereupon the enthusiast straighlcned him out in a jif- fy with this rejoinder: "Oh, lisa nol because yo'ura so good. lisa because lhe olher fella isa so bad." CULVER TELLS ANOTHER CAMPAIGN STORY with a moral: First impressions aren't always accurate. It happened during an early campaign when he still expe- rienced considerable nervousness every time ho made an address. On this occasion that "bullerfiy-in-thc stomach" feeling wasn t helped by an elderly gentleman seated in the front row. After Culver's every sentence the elderly one shook his head vigorously, as if in tola] disagreement. "I thought he was disapproving everything I said" Culver recalled recently, "and it shook me up. "But when I: finished, he came up and told me it was one of the greatest speeches he had ever heard. "Turned out he had palsy." Old Timers CULVER ALSO IS GETTING MILEAGE, out of a true sto- ry that happened during one of his early campaigns. He was trying to win votes in strongly-Republican Al- If you live in one of these 16 Eastern Iowa counties and normally pay a toll charge to order a Gazette want ad... DIAL The TOLL FREE PRIVATE Want Ad Number 800-332-7976 By PM Day Preceding Publication 11 AM Saturday for Sunday AM Saturday for Monday P, Cancollationi or corrections of wan) adl, or any other Gazotto buiineu, connot be ac- cepted on the loll-fron lino. 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