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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1974 - Page 29

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Haplds (intUt: It. IM 33 41 I A I lit I The Cedar Haplds C.ntttt. Making Wreaths in Waukon is Community Project By ElMn J K.L.V I By ElMra J. WAUKON At least one price lino bus ftan wh h'8 8cason' nan 300 homes their Christmas wreaths at last year's prices. Made by Mrs. Eaton Cote of rural Wau- kon, the wreaths were sold door-to-door in a two-night campaign by the Jaycccs for each, the price they have been the last few years. Barbara Cote has been making the wreaths for about 10 years. The has nigh priority at the Cole home (or the last two weeks of November. At limes friends and relatives cut branch- es into twigs until a great heap of evergreens crowds Into Cole's basement work area. The project aim usurps four-year-old Amy's play space and time. "1 wish those old wreaths were she exclaimed once, but a few minutes later she was happily helping spray a finished wreath. "It's really a community Mrs. Cole explained. "I couldn'l accepl II if It weren't for Ihe kindness of heart of the peo- ple who help." The help begins with gathering Ihe wire Mrs. Eaton Cote, of rural Woukon, assisted by her four-year-old daughter Amy, sprays a fine coating of snow upon a completed wreath which will be sold by the local Jaycees as a fund raising project. Iowa to Add'Satellite'Crime Labs Bv Robert Marshall Drake University Journalism sludcnl DBS MOINES Tesl tubes line one work bench, across the aisle is a counter filled with expensive drug detection machines and microscopes, and in the back room is a photography studio. These are only a few of the quarter-of-a-miilion dollars In equipment used in Iowa's crime laboratory here. The bureau of criminal investigalion criminalislics lab began three years ago aft- er the federal crime lab phased oul its case process- ing. The federal lab is now mainly a training facility. Every state, except Arkansas, currently has some form of crime lab. Satellite Labs Iowa plans to add four "sat- ellite labs" throughout the stale lo handle increasing work loads and provide quicker processing, said Michael L. Rehberg, crime lab adminislrator. Some of the lab's capabili- ties include matching hairs found al a crime scene with hairs from a known1 source, such as a suspect or an an- imal; matching a bullet to a particular gun, and identify- ing drugs. "If we didn't have drugs to identify we might not have a (crime) Rehberg said. He added that about 50 per- cent of all cases processed are drug-related. Drug idcntificalion requires Ihe full-lime attention of three criminologisls, who are chem- ical technicians. Rehberg explained thai lo Iry drug relalcd cases, the prosecutor must be able to prove in court Ihe drugs' exact content. Avoid Mix-ups To avoid possible mix-ups, each piece of evidence is han- dled by one criminologlst, Rehberg said. The criminolo- gist usually receives the evid- ence by mail or personal de- livery, processes the ease and returns il directly to the source. Results are available only to the county attorney where the crime was commit- ted. "This makes it easier for Rehberg said, "but sometimes it creates problems for others." Some people who should have access to the in- formation must work through the county attorneys, Rehberg said. The crime lab photographs all processed evidence for use when cases come lo trial. The lab has handled cases so far this year as compared to in 1973. Rehberg attributed the in- crease to greater awareness by law enforcement officers of Ihe capabilities and usefulness of the crime lab. Any Iowa law enforcement i'v ;ncy hav- ing physical evidence may use the lab's services. 19 Employes Currently 19 employes work in the lab, including nine criminologists. Each criminol- ogist is an expert in al leasl one field of police work sucli as firearms, drugs or lie do- lectors. The nine criminolo- gists have degrees 'in chem- istry wilh five or more holding advanced degrees. Rehberg said (here is currenlly slilf competition for employes belwecn states which are expanding their labs. A significant amount of Ihe criminologists' working lime is spent in court appearances, Rehberg said. Iowa law permits written documents as court evidence, but some cas- es still require personal ap- pearances by the person who processed the case. For example, in September criminnlogisls appeared 3D limes in courts throughout the state. "You can figure thai each courl appearance lakes one working Rehberg said. Involved Cases Mosl eases are processed in less than a week but more involved cases, such as hom- icides, may take up to two weeks, Rehberg said. "Many times we don't know what is and what isn't evid- ence until we get a chance to examine it in the Reh- berg said. He believes it's better to bring in a Iruckload of potential evidence than risk leaving an Important element al Ihe crime scene. The lab's quarter-of-a-mil- lion dollar annual budget is 75 percent stale-funded and 25 percent federally funded. Beginning in July 1975, Rehberg said, the lab will be paid for entirely by Iowa. When the lab was established in 1971, federal funds paid for 75 percent of the lab. Training Schools Each year lab technicians arc sent lo training schools in Ihe FBI's laboratory in Vir- Einia. Criminologisls receive specialized training in such things as glass examination, pkr.ls, soil and personnel management. Rehberg, who was formerly chief chemist with the Wis- consin crime lab al Madison, said as an administrator he misses not working on cases. "I'm a lie said. "Now 1 have to get my salis- faclion oul of gelling Ihe best possible equipment and sala- ries for my men." The lab's filing system will have lo be converted lo com- puter or microfilm storage in Ihe next couple of years "or we face being buried in pap- Rehberg said. Students Examine Chamber Procedures FAYETTE-Thc working side of a Chamber of Com- merce office will be examined by throe Upper Iowa college students during the January Interim, which will begin Jan. 13. For two weeks the Upper lownns, who have completed n roKiilnr campus course on community nmanagcment, will servo as Interns in Chamber offices in two stales. The Internship is designed for students who may wish to consider n cnreor in Chamber of Commerce management, and is offered as a part of the major in Chamber of Com- merce administration offered by Ihe university. DRIVE SAFELY K in <0pm'yw1l Mil ho- I in c SEE THE HOME OF YOUR CHOICE TODAY! coal hangers thai give the two-fool wreaths (heir shape. "After the hangers begin to get rusly, Pcnney's and Graham's save them for me. My friends save theirs, too. Some years they're short, especially when they're send- ing Iheir families to college wilh slacks of hangers. But we put out the word and people bring them to my brother's shoe store, or I'll find bundles of.thcm in my car." Shaping Hangers Shaping the hangers is done by the men of the Cote family, Eaton senior and junior, who also carry the finished wreaths lo hang Ihem on ropes strung in Ihe garage and shed. Each wrealh conlalns a bushel basket of cut evergreens. This year there are three va- rielies, including one long-needled pine, The .Jaycees supply the greenery. "II was a grand safari the Sunday they brought (hem. .They had two Iruckloads, but they had lo gel more later." Jaycee Bill Blagsvedt, a teacher at senior high who is in charge of Ihe wrealh project this year, said the Jaycees do nol experience any particular difficulty gelling greens." Evergreen Donations "We gol most of them from Sylvan Ash- backer's windbreak. He wanted the bottoms trimmed. We got some from him iast year, too. We also got a small load from one of our members, Ernie Burroughs." Mrs. Cote gets the cones and other sup- plies. She buys wire, plastic ribbon, and trimmings through Ihe greenhouses; hairpins to fasten on Ihe bows come from a beauty shop. To keep down the price, she buys even Ihe spray wholesale. Price is also a factor in making ail the wreaths alike. "I used to think I should make them different each year, but I checked in other towns and found theirs don't change, so the last three or four years I ha- ven't changed the style. The Jaycees said it suited them, so I didn't ask anyone else." Counting Wreaths An adding machine 'tape with numbers from one lo 300 is prepared by daughter Sal- ly. As soon as she finishes a wreath, Mrs. Cote marks Ihe tape. "Last year we got mixed up somehow and had to count the wreaths to doublecheck the number, which was quite a job. Otherwise we keep a doub- lecheck by the number of hangers." At the botlom of the tape is an emphatic "Hooray! Merry "Last year I used the tape for Ihe bow on my own wreath, but nobody paid attention lo whal il she said ruefully. Mrs. Cole learned florist's work when she was a teenager about to buy a small down- town floral shop in Waukon. Her mother Mrs. Fred Bailsman, who helps wilh Ihe wreaths, still uses the small greenhouse Hausmans buill at Iheir home at that time. Planted Trees The whole Cote family loves the outdoors- Ihey have laken many hunling and fishing trips in Ihe United States and Canada. They have also planted about Christmas trees on a slope they can see from their living room window. For an indoor year-round activity Mrs. Cote makes miniature arrangements of straw flowers and silk roses which a friend ar- ranged for her to sell though a LaCrosse gift shop. "I call her my business manager laughed Mrs. Cote. Even Amy has made some miniature arrangements in (he floral corner of Ihe basement. Give a Singer SewingGift... 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