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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                BOND VOTE TUESDAY Junior High Needs (In Section A) Section Complacent Chamber Revives (In Section B) Weather Cold today aid lulghl, high In teens, liw 5 to 15. Warmer tomorrow, high in CltY FINAL 35 CENTS VOLUME 92 NUMBER 333 CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UP1, NEW YORK TIMES DEMOS VOTE PARTY CHARTER Fuel Curbs Foreshadowed By Ford Economic Talks WASHINGTON (UPI) In a possible prelude to mandatory U.S. fuel conservation 'measures, President Ford met Saturday with top domestic advisers to find out how he can reduce energy consumption without touching off serious economic or foreign policy consequences. Officials attending the two- hour session in the cabinet room told reporters afterward that no major decisions were taken. They quoted the President as saying the issues he must balance are "complex as th'e Frank Zarb, executive direc- tor of the Energy Resources Council, left open the clear .possibility that Ford would order at least some mandatory measures to conserve fuel when he' outlines a new federal energy policy'next month. Too Early But Zarb and Chairman Alan Greenspan .of the Council of Economic Advisers stressed at a news briefing after the meeting with Ford that it is too early to make any final decisions about what new steps to take. Among the examples Zarb cited in describing what might be done were a return to the mandatory fuel allocation program imposed last year at the height of the Arab oil boycott; an increase in the federal gasoline tax; and a limit on oil imports, either in Mystery Gift It arrived again. Right on schedule and as much a j mystery as ever a check for for Camp Good i Health. i The check, sent by an i anonymous donor, is I drawn on Uniled Stale bank, and that's all anyone i knows or cares to say: i about it. None-lhe-lcss il is i received with sincere: i thanks, as arc all dona- i lions to Ihe camp fund, by j j Ihe Children's Home of j i Cedar Rapids. The home op'erales j i Camp Good Heallh, which provides a summer camp- j ing experience for children i j who would nol olherwise j be able lo attend a camp, j (List of this week's donors j smay be found on page] jtwo.) lerms of volume or dollar value; and gasoline rationing. The White House meeting came one day after the ad- ministration, acknowledged ils efforts to urge voluntary energy conservation had fallen short of what (he President had hoped and that the lalcsl report on unemployment, showing a 6.5 percent level in November, was a "serious concern" lo Ford. Ford said lasl Oclober that he hoped his voluntary approach could reduce the flow of oil from abroad by one million barrels a day by the end of 1975. Zarb said that tar- get was unchanged now. 'Mandatory Actions? Zarb said it is now necessary to decide whether mandatory actions must be taken to achieve Ford's objective. White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen said the purpose of Saturday's meeting was to give the President look" at the problem and to review the options open to him. "The President will 'make his decisions after he has seen all of the analytical work and studied the options.at his dis- said Znrb, who is awaiting senate confirmation of his nomination to head the Federal Energy Administra- tion. Asked lo assess Ihe current fuel supply situalion, Zarb said: "There is sufficient pe- troleum out there if you're willing to pay 'the price to meel almosl any need. The problem at the moment is not one of sdpply. It's how much this society is paying for it." Greenspan said the adminls- (Conlinued: Page 3, Col. 1) Simon: No Plan To Resign Post WASHINGTON (UPI) Treasury Secretary Simon Sa- turday denied reports he was Ihrealening lo resign. In response lo reports that his aides said he would leave the Ford administralion if the Presidenl shifled emphasis from a bailie against inflation lo a fighl against recession, Simon told UPI the report was "ridiculous." "I have absolutely no inten- tion of resigning, he said. "People are always speculaling in Washington and most of the time he added. Vital Compromise Averts Walkout KANSAS CITY (AP) Averting a threatened black walkout, Democrats shouted their approval Saturday of a final crucial compromise, scrapped their controversial quota system and passed the first written charter'of any major U.S. political party. The final compromise, a product of marathon negotia- tions by the party's governors, blacks and women, was ham- mered-out in a trailer just off the convention floor as nearly delegates sought to end the internal feuds that have consumed Democrats in recent years. "We can't ask the American people to trust us unless we can trust each said Qhio Oov. .1 oh n Gilligan, a key mover in the drive by the governors to assort themselves as leaders in unifying the party. After 1976 For the most part, the charter takes the party's current practices and em- bodies them in a constitution that will govern its activities in the years after 1976. But on the question of delegate selection rules, the final compromise removed language that blacks and women feared would make fu- ture credential challenges more difficult. It has already been adopted for 1976, but Sa- turday's action removed it. from post-1976 rules. It. also 'bans mandatory quo: las while putting the burden on State Democratic parties to take steps to assure .full1 par- ticipation of women, minori- ties, Indians and young people. Some party regulars and AFL-CIO officials complained bitterly about the change. Shouted Approval But approval of the compromise was assured after the miniconvention delegates shouted their voice-vote approval of a move tiAsubsti- lute the final compromise proposal. Delegates throughout the Pago 3, Col. 7) Demos Threatened By Labor Boycott Gazette Photo by Ditano Crock The Well-Dressed Man The "snow folks" on the yard of the David Butz residence at 4619 F avenue NE last weekend included this colorfully-dressed snowman, a yellow octopus, a woman, a drunk resting against a tree, a turtle and a'wall.' They were made by Butz with help from his three daughters, shown here working on the snowman. From left are Angela, 9; Tina, 7, and Julie, 5. Butz used spray paint to give the snowman and the other "folks" their colorful dress. He said he got the idea for colored snow sculpture when he attended a snow festival in Estherville last winter. By Frank Nyc KANSAS CITY Democrats were jubilant Saturday night after adapting a national governing'charter said to be the first of ils designed to.opeli party doors to all Americans. But they did it with the Ihreal of a labor boycott ot< Iheir 1976 campaign ringing In one ear and a flat forecast that they are headed down the road lo another 1972 presidential election disaster ringing in the olher. That didn't slop former Gov. Terry Sanford of Norlh Carolina, Democratic Charter Commission chairman, from gavelling Ihe new docu- ment through with this pronouncement: "Ready To Rule" "The Dcmoeralic parly is now open lo all people. II is concerned wtlh the issues the people face and it is now ready .to'rule the nation." It was John Henning, vice- president of the California AFL-CIO, -who sounded the labor boycotl threat as he pro- tested the language in one sec- No Formula for Happiness NOTE: This is the last in a series examining some of the factors which tear children and parents apart. It also provides some observations about keeping families together. By Dale Kuctcr There is no magic formula for family happiness, between husband and wife or parents and children, but it does seem lo be a more elusive goal lhan a generation ago. While most still regard the family unit as the foundation of a society, there seem to be more and more factors un- dermining the family. Some bluntly say the family Is under attack and crumbling. Is a more urbanized society at fault? The communlca- lions explosion and almost unlimited mobility? The "da yitnr thing" ethic, and "I'm number philosophy? Just in Linn county there are 200 children living, in substitute foster and group homes, and unquestionably hundreds more who live wilh friends or relatives rather than with natural parents. In (our interviews, persons who work with families both prior to, and in some cases after, trouble arises, related their observations concerning child-parent relationships. Frank Sleh, executive director of the Family Service agency in Cedar Rapids, said (iierc is a constant need "to keep saying to our children by words and action 'Wo care about you'." Don Claussen, branch director for the Lutheran Home Finding Society, sees a breakdown in communications be- tween parents and their children as perhaps Ihe biggest problem. Jerry Smith, a case worker for Linn county social serv- ices, places most of the responsiblllly on parents, and finds it ludicrous thai they receive little or no training for their mosl important job. Dr. Arthur Williams, rural Anamosa, a private counse- lor, believes there is a stronger family unit in rural areas, and he attributes it to closer family contacl and the presence of an extended family (grandparents, aunts and Sleh said it Is Important too that children know parents aren't perfect. "Tell them yon love them, but that you don't have a roadman for Ihcir H'e, that you don't know everything, but that you think you have some of the answers. "It is also said Slch, "to let the child know you're not going to clobber him if he makes a mistake, but that yon expect him lo learn from such mistakes." While there is no magic formula, Slch said people can elect to respect each other and learn from each other. "If people do thai, they can change the way they get along. In the (Continued; Page 21 A, Col. 1) I Kissinger in Arms Pact Plea WASHINGTON (AP) The Sovlel Union would have grave doubts about the American commitment to detente if congress rejected the new SALT agreement with Moscow, Secretary of Slate Kissinger said Saturday. He said lhal the Soviets had "made very major conces- sions" in negotiating the second nuclear arms limitation agreement two weeks ago in Vladivostok. If the house and senate do not approve the accord, Kissinger said at a. news conference, "the Soviet Union would only be able to conclude that a political detente with us faces insur- mountable difficulties." First Defense The secretary was making his first major puhMc defense of the Vladivostok agreement, particularly the provisions set- tins a celling on the number of missiles and bombers Ihe two countries will be able to deploy over the next 10 years. Kissinger was questioned closely about Ihe limit placed in thai lime period on the number of missiles (hat can be armed with MIRVs multiple warheads. The agreement allows missiles and bombers to each cuunlry and MIRVs apiece. Repealing that these limits put an end to an arms race, Kissinger said that in strategic terms a lowering of the ceilings would make little difference. Allhough first reaction to the agreement in congress was generally favorable, Sen. Jackson (D-Wash.) has said he Today's Chuckle Nostalgia is like a gram- mar lesson: You find the present tense and the past perfect. coovruni would mount a drive to get the administralion lo lower Ihe number of missiles permitted. Extending Deadline In another matter, Kissinger urged that Ihe senate's decision extending a deadline for ctitling off military aid to Turkey be repeated by the house. Lasl week the senate moved back two months the deadline in which the Ford administra- lion musl certify progress toward a settlement of the Greek-Turkish dispute over Cyprus or the American aid to Ankara will stop automa- tically. The original deadline is Doc. 10. In other areas, the .secretary made these points: He understands tho American companies whose properly was nationalized Sa- turday by Venezuela arc satis- fied will) the compensation (Continued: Page 3, Col. 1) lion of the charter because it; failed to mention labor. Labor, he declared in an angry voice that-'boomed through the convention has been "an indispensable element" in Ihe Democratic coalition thai wins elections; and he flatly declared: Democrats not win the White House in 1976" without labor's support. But Henning did not speak for all of labor. Represcnlalives of tho Unit-: ed Aulo Workers, Commu'nica-- lions Workers and Union including several in; the Iowa delegation forces with delegates from black and women's caucuses to work out a compromise in Ihe language of another section with.Democratic governors, and national chairman Robert' Strauss.. Selecting Delegates This was the section dealing with the method of selecting delegates to 'national conven- tions beginning in 1980. (See. (Continued: Page li, Col. 4) Today's Index SECTION A Late Deaths.....................................................3 City Hall Notes.....................................4 Accent On Youth.....................................7 Editorials..............................................6-9 Rcoort Cord...........................................M SECTION B Iowa Television Table...................................... Frank Hye's Political Food........................................................8 Marlon...................................................12 Farm.................................................13-lS Bulidlna.............................................16-19 Movlei..............................................7071 Record 71 SECTION C Social.................................................1-76 Around the Tnwn..................................7 New Travel........................................., SECTION 0 Sports..........................................1 0 Outdoor town.........................................8 Financial............................. v-17 New York Stom.........................10 Wont Adi...... 1174 Croivword 70 Parade Comltt 70 IB   

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