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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - December 1, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                TRAINING TO BE PARENTS two C.R, Courses Offer Help (In Section A) IT'S GOOD EATING TIME Recipes for Big Family, Holiday (In Section C) Section A VVeofher Cleiriig aid Sunday tlgkl, liws i U 12. Sway Monday, ilgks mld-lls. CITY FINAL 39 CINTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA; SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 19'74 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES filler, Coal Pact leered by Miners By New York Times Service BECKLEY, W. Va. In a prtJlest caravan through the narrow streets here Saturday, members: of the'United'Mine Workers' largest and most politically volatile district honked'automobile horns and hooted disapproval of the proposed strike settlement they are being asked to ratify. The well-organized demon- stration, a motorcade that went on to other coal-mining communities near here through the bleak, drizzly.aft- ernoon, indicated that in West Virginia, at leader- ship1 of Arnold. Miller, the strongly pro-settlement union president, could be rebuffed by the membership. Many miners here said that the three-yeaf, ,64-percenl wage and benefit increase Miller negotiated with the coal 'Legalized' Pot Order Rescinded (AP) The U.S. attorney has cancelled his order riot to prosecute per- sons with small amounts of marijuana in the District of Columbia, The: order, to go Into effect Monday, had been the subject nf controversy since II was announced three weeks ago by U.S. Attorney Earl Silbcrt. The plan had' been opposed by district, police officials and by Attorney General Saxbc, and an assistant to Sllbert said Saxbc had pressed him to drop the idea. Silbert and jus- tice department spokesmen denied any pressure, however. industry was not enough. Mill- er has insisted that the com- panies have no more to give. Vote Monday A secret-ballot ratification vote is to be, held Monday among the um'on's active members, of whom live among the steep- ly sloping hills of this south- ern West Virginia union dis- trict.- If the contract is rejected, Miller said Saturday, the .walkout could last five or seven more weeks, "bankrupt- ing" the union, causing fur- ther damage to the nation's economy-and almost certainly inviting a government con-: frnntation with the strikers. If the vote, to be'tallied at the union headquarters in Washington, shows that the settlement has been the strike, now 19 days old. could be over by the of, next week. Some union locals, particularly in Pennsylvania, apparently wilj mil vote until Tuesday because the deer sea- son opens Monday and many miners want to go'hunting. Snickers, Whistles .Miller came, here to- tell several hundred miners, "In my opinion, this is the best contract ever negotiated by any labor union in the country." His assessment was greeted with snickers, whis- tles and hoots. He spoke to representatives, of. the 75 union locals in dis- trict 29, assembled to hear an explanation of the agreement (Continued; Page 3, Col. ii) SRAEL Man Killed, Wife Hurt In Attack An Amana Christmas" The featured exhibit at the Ceda, Rapids Art center, 324 Third street SE, this month will be "An Amana Christmas" On display will be antique toys, quilts, Christmas decorations and many other items that are a part of the her- itage of the Amana Colonies. Kurt Peters, 4, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peters, 401 Carter street NW, got a preview The quilt hanging in tjie1 background is part of the exhib- it which opens today at 2 pirn. Arf'center hours are 10 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; 10 a.m. to p.m. Thursday; 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday and closed Monday. By Dale Kuetcr After her husband died of cancer in April of 1972, the widow could not cope with the prospect of rearing their four children alone. She began to drink heavily and all but abandoned her youngsters, just as her mother had done. The situation wors- ened to the point the county was forced to lake the children from her. (First in d Series) In another home in Cedar Rapids, the hatred between a father and son became so In- tense It drove them apart to separate lives. Now the par- EDITOR'S Though" the holiday.'.' sea- son is usually accompa- nied by scenes of happy families, some parents and their children will, be separated as they have been all year. This is the; of a series examining; some of the factors vrhich tear children and parents apart. cuts are divorced and the en-'' lire family, splintered. Children separated from Iheir real parents is not a new problem.. Familial severance, however, has focused largely on the divorce picture and slightly on the tblalteeparatinn of parents .from, children. The'scope such division between parents and off- spring, completely aside from cases such as divorce where ..there .is usually continued .association with, one parent, is f Linn csunly seclal seryli-es personnel, estimate there are chiidreh'. In' the county are in substitute hortics 159 children In'102 (osier homes--and the re- mainder In group The 'cases involve neglect; abuse', 'juvenile delinquency, incompatibility, parental or' Families child health problems, poverty and other causative factors. There are perhaps another to 25 children below the age of 18, according to juvenile probation authorities, who are in state institutions such as the Juvenile Home at Toledo, the Training School for Boys at Eldora and the Training School tor Girls at Mitchell- "Ville. .1, are undetermined of, other children who no: longer1 live with, their cuts, but instead.; with '1 US. Financing Work Oh Behavior Control Whfio; '4'me '-''private .agen- .cies stiil provide assistance to 1GA, Cb.l.l.) WASHINGTON The federal government fi-' nances experiments to control "anti-social" human behavior with brain surgery, computers, radio transmitters implanted in the head and other means, a senate report said Saturday. "There is a real'question whether the government should .be involved at all in programs'-that-potentiaUy pose substantial threats to our Sen. Sam .Er.vin'; said in., a .preface .to the' jBl-p'age', report tiisiubcommittee on cons'tttutjon.ai rights. "The., .question'.' becomes ev.eii more acute when these as are today, in the absence of strict controls." Behavior control technology j f British in Blasts; Population Controls Backed: Survey New Bombing Try Injures 5 i LONDON (AP) Detec- tives arrested 13 persons, including two women, Satur- day in connection with a pair of terrorist bombings thai killed seven persons near London In the last two inonths. Later In the day someone threw bombs Into n .London pub injuring five patrons. Scotland Yard said two bombs were thrown against a wall at the Talbot Pub near Victoria station and Buck- ingham palace on Saturday night, but only one of them [exploded. The other wns later (tofused. Witnesses Mid almul 80 persons were In the tavern at the time of the blast. The pro-dawn police raids in London dime us security was lightened at British ports and airports under now laws !o combat terrorism spilling over from five years of sectar- ian strife In Northern Ireland, Terrorist bombings have lefl a loin] of 411 persons dead and scores injured nil the British mainland over tlir past 'Vfi years. The police raids also coin- cided with a pledge by govern- (Continued: Pago ,1, Col. I) By Gladwln Hill. Now York Times Service A national opinion survey indicates, thai a majority of people lii Ihc United States think population growth will have to lie regulat- ed, biilh globally and in' Ihc areas where they live, to uvcrt resource shortages, pollution and lowered quality of life. The survey findings were sel forth in "Stale of the. Na- tion a periodic study made by Potomac Associates, 11 Washington research organ- The questions were among- many covered In an opinion sampling made for the study by the George Gallup or- ganization. The survey covered (i.fllif) persons more than the usual scientifically designed national cross-section. II was made lust April, afire the unset of the energy crisis. The respondents were asked: "Some people feel that the world will reach a point some day where because ef popula-. lion and economic growth, there won't be enough water, land, food and other natural resources .foiv everybody. Other people believe that the world can continue to xrow without running into serious shortages because somebody will always be able to solve these problems. Do you your- self believe that sooner or lat- er world population and eco- nomic growth will have to bo regulated to avoid serious shortages, or The response wns: Yes, 64 I Today's Chuckle The government keeps saying we're not in a reces- sion so this must be the worst boon) in history. percent; no. 29 percent; don't know, 7 percent. On a local the ques- tion asked was: "Speaking now of the general area where you live; some people'say pop- ulation and industrial growth in this area should be regulat- ed in order to prevent more pollution and improve the quality of life. Others say (his would mean fewer job op- portunities slower eco- nomic progress. Dn you your- self feel that population nnd industrial growth in this area where you live should or should not be The response wns: Yes, 54 percent; no. 37 percent; don't know, i) percent. tries to cure child mplesters, homosexuals, drug abusers, alcoholics, shoplifters, hyper: active children and other "anti-social" persons through such techniques as psycho- surgery a type ;of brain surgery called "murder of the mind" by its critics. HEW, Justice "The subcommittee -found that the federal government, through a number of depart- ments and agencies, is going ahead with behavior modifica- tion projects, including psyctiosurgeryj' without a; re- view fully adequate to: protect the constitutional rights of the the re- port It said the department of Health, Education and Wel- fare-spends the most; on-be- .havior research, but the jus- (ice.department, the Veterans Administration, defense de- labor department and National Science Founda- tion are also involved. The three-year study de- scribed an HEW-funded drug- treatment program called "The Seed" In the words of a south Florida high school guidance counsellor; they (student "seed- return, they are 'straight', namely quiet, well- dressed, wllh short hair, and not under the influence of drugs. "Robot-Like" "However, they seem to be living In. a robot-like at- mosphere, they won't speak to anyone outside of their own group Seedlings seem lo (Continued: 3, Col. 4) JERUSALEM (AP) Two Arab guerillas took over a house in a village near the Lebanese (border Saturday night, killed a 37-yeaf-old man and-wounded his wife before, both were, military sources said. An Israeli command spokes-. man said one. of the guerillas' was wounded in an exchange- of gunfire when troops stormed, the house in Riha- niya, a small village nestled in the .hills three.hiiles south of the Lebanese border. Both gunmen had infiltrated across the Lebanese frontier, the military claimed Riha- niya is-populated by Moslem Circassians, who are Israeli citizens and, unlike Israeli ArabSj serve in the army. It was not certain if the guerillas picked the non-Jew- ish town or just jtt'acked the first village they came across. Killed Immediately The terrorists sneaked into the village late Saturday night, took over the brick house and held it for an hour sources said. The spokesman said. "The terrorists killed a man and wounded a woman before thei Israeli defense force moved in. One of the captured terror- ists Was wounded and the other was unhurt. We arc in- terrogating them." Residents of Rlhaniya said the guerillas took over the home of Saubhi Mussa Abzak, 37, a father of three, killed him, immediately and wound- ed his wife, Samia, in the leg. It was the first attack by Arab guerillas .against a non- Jewish target in Israel. The: inhabitants of Rihaniya are descendants, of 19th Century Russian' immigrants. .Israeli Raids 'i The guerilla' action Satur- day came only hours after Is- raeli warplancs attacked suspected Arab guerilla tar- gets in southern Lebanon for the first time in almost three weeks. Arab newsmen said four American-made Phantom fighter-bombers bombed and rocketed fields and hills sur- rounding three villages in south Lebanon, four to six miles from the border, for 15 minutes. Vegetable and to- bacco crops were damaged but there were no casualties, they said. roday s index SECTION A late News........................... 1, 3, 16 Deaths.......................................... 3 8-9 Cltx, Hall Notes............................. K2 Report Card................................. 14 Accent On 20 SECTION B Iowa News............................... 1-1 I Marion.......................................... 6 Television Table............................. Frank Nye's Political Notes............. 8 Food........................................... II Building.................................. 12-15 Movies................................... 16-17 Record 16 18-19 SECTION C Social....................................... 1-24 Around the Town........................... 2 Now'Books.................................... 2 Travel.......................................... 23 SECTION D I -7 Outdoor Iowa................................ 7 Financial................................... 0-11 New York Slocks............................ 8 Want Ads............................... I2-J2. Crossword.................................... let Parade 1-20 Comics....................................... 1-8   

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