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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 29, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Krl.. Nov. 20. 1971 Professor Richard Handy, right, and Paul Peterson ISU engineer, examine bore hole shear tester. Rock Tester to Aid Safety AMES A portable rock strength tester, which prov- ides safety advantages to underground mining opera- tions, has been developed at Iowa State university. The device enables a quick, on-the-spol, evaluation of rock strength properties. Under development for three years at the ISU engi- neering research institute, it is the invention of Richard L. Handy, professor of civil en- gineering. Known as the "Bore-Hole Shear the instrumenl was recently given its first public showing at the Denver Federal center, U.S. bureau of mines. Funds from the bureau have assisted in its develop- ment. Danger Areas Paul W. Peterson, director of the engineering research institute, said "The new rock tester should be a boon to underground mine safety by allowing a quick, in-place evaluation of rock strength properties before something falls in, thus jeopardizing lives of miners or laborers. Where potential danger areas are found, the instrument also can be used in the design of protective measures." Coal Chunks One such method, Peterson said, is increasing the rock strenglh by "rock bolting" whereby rack exposed in an opening is held in place with bolts which penetrate to deep- er rock. The new inslrumenl is unique in that it also allows a prediction of the strenglh aft- er bolting. Handy said the Denver dem- onstration, as well as most of Consulting Firm Chosen To Study County Salaries DES MOINES (IDPA) A special legislative committee has selected a Kansas City management consulting firm to conduct a study of the sala- ries of Iowa's elected county officials. Legislators hope to use the study next year in setting sal- aries for county officials. The study, which stems from a resolution adopted by the house, has become en- twined in politics. When the local services committee sought approval from the legislative council to award the contract to Ernst and Ernst for there were cries of politics because Jerry Perpich, a managing partner in the CPA firm, is also the Republican state fi- nance chairman. Three Bids Three bids were submitted originally. A special six member committee was appointed by the legislative council to re- view the situation and em- powered to select a firm. II was decided to expand the scope of the study to include "cost efficiency." The Laurence Loiter firm in Kansas City, which has an off- ice in West Des Moines, was selected by the special com- mittee headed by Rep. Delwyn Stromer The Lciter firm, one of 12 lo submit bids, has a bid of 500. Ernst and Ernst submit- ted a bid of for the revised study. The cost efficiency aspect of the study is expectd to cover such areas as improving sev- ice and citing ways that county expenditures can be reduced. the developmental testing, was conducted in coal chunks brought into the Iowa State laboratory. However, field tests have been conducted by Handy and three students, John Pitt, Larry Engle and Bruce Roorda. Most of those lests were done in the Star mine, a coal strip mine near Bussey, owned by Art Huyser. The device will be tested in underground coal mines in Ohio, Illinois and Indiana. "The principle in" the lust is so simple one wonders why it hasn't been tried says its inventor. "We simply drill a hole, put in the device and push two plates against opposite sides of the hole. The pressure on the plates is ad- justed to any desired value from 100 up to psi, and the device is then pulled or pushed to cause sliding or shearing of material in the' sides of Ihe hole. Measure Force "We measure Ihe force which causes shearing and (hen we know Ihe strength under that particular value of applied conlacl pressure. By repealing the test, which is very fast, we can predict the strength under any cxisiling or anticipated load. "Underground mining increases the load by remov- ing supporting rock; hopefully now, one will be able to pre- dict how much rock can be removed without sacrifice of safety." A similar test for soils was developed by Handy and his co-workers at Iowa State some years ago. The soil tester is now sold commercially and used by consulting engineers, federal agencies, and universi- ties. Shear Plates "One of the biggest prob- lems in adapting the soil test- er lo coal turned out to be the shear Handy said. "Dan Klockow, while a gradu- ate studenl at Iowa Slale, found that (he soil-type shear plates were not giving Ihe right answers in coal and other rocks because Ihe plales were slipping. So we had lo change the plates so they would bite into the coal with- out destroying ils slrength, which is whal we wanted to measure." Handy remarked thai much of the credit for the new plales goes lo Pill, a former gradu- ate studenl, now a U.S. army captain teaching at Ft. Bcl- voir, Va. Because of the high stresses involved, special steels are required, as well as special machining and heat- treating techniques. Future plans for the device include adaptation of an au- tomated data acquisition unit for belter portability and more rapid processing of data, and dcvleopmcnt of a produc- lion model for use cither in the mine or in deep holes drilled from Ihe ground sur- face prior lo mining. Vinton Residents Object to City Rezoning Proposal Grievance Group Recommends Law License Suspension DES MOINES (IDPA) A grievance commission of (he Iowa supreme court has rec- ommended to the court that the law license of a Grund Center attorney, T. C. Strack, be suspended for 36 months. Last year Strack pleaded guilty in federal court at Des Moines to income tax evasion charges and received a six month sentence fromFcderal Judge William C. Stuart. Strack was accused of "will- fully and knowingly" attempt- ing to avoid paying a large part of income lax due on his 1966 and 1967 federal Income tax returns. Records show thai he paid in federal tax for 19C6, while the government claimed he owed Slrack paid income tax of 135.14 for 1967 and the gov- ernment said he owed 732.70. The recommendation to suspend Strack's license to practice law for 36 months is Ihe longest yet recommended by any grievance commission. The prcvius high was 18 months in the case of former Congressman James Brom- wcll of Cedar Rapids. The commission filed its re- port with the supreme court on Wednesday. County Home Rule Clears First Hurdle DES MOINES (UPI) A constitutional amendment granting home to rule to counties has cleared its first legislative hurdle. The proposal, patterned aft- er one that broadened the powers of municipalities, would allow counties new free- dom of action except in areas where specific prohibilions are written into state law. The proposal was passed by a leg- islative committee here Wednesday. Donald Cleveland, executive director of the Iowa Assn. of Counties, said counties now are expected lo conform lo imaginary norms although counties have greatly differe- ing needs, often depending on population. Keokuk County Offices Moved SIGOURNEY-Offices are being moved in tho Keokuk county court house. The county superintendent's office, which has been located on the northeast corner on (he first floor, have been moved across the slrcet to the court house annex on Ihe norlheasl corner of the square. The country assessor's off- ice and possibly the soldiers relief offices will move from the ihird floor of Ihe court house to Ihe vacated superin- tendent's office on (he first With more room needed for the magistrate's office, it will move to Ihe vacated assessor's office. VINTON The Vinton city council held a public hearing al the its Wednesday night meeting to rezone property in northwest Vinton south of the Sale Barn road lo Ihe north line of the Terrace Hill mobile home park from R2 to Ml. Steve and Rosemary Boisen and their attorney were pre- sent to object to the rezoning. They stated that rezoning would decrease the value of their home and property and a proposed Bcnton county maintanance facility to be built immediately south and west of their property would impare the appearance of Iheir home site and would "ruin" the quiet residential atmosphere. Gary Thudium spoke for Vathpeda, Inc., Ihe present owners of the property, and stated the area would best serve the city of Vinton as an industrial area. It was pointed out that when Ihe city recently annexed the property, it was intended as an industrial area although the property was annexed as R2 which is required by law. He also said that in October 1973, the planning and zoning committee recommended the property be zoned Ml. After discussion, the council No Losses DES MOINES No lowans had lost Iheir jobs or been idled in layoffs as a re- sult of the two-week old na- llnnwldc coal miner, strike as of Nov. 22, an official of Ihe Iowa division of employment security said Tuesday. "There arc several industries in Iowa that arc dependent on coal, but we have had no reporls" that any arc cutting back on manpower or production. tabled a decision until the Dec. 12 council meeting and recommended negotiations lie worked out before lhat time between Vathpeda and Ihe Boisens. Hospital to Build Million Addition DES MOINES Mercy hospital officals have announced plans for a million addition, including earmarked for ar- chitecl and consultant fees. Construction is tentatively scheduled lo begin in the fall of 1976, hospital administrator Sister Mary Gervase said. However, detailed planning of the proposed Uvo-story, square foot addition is expected lo lake 18 months, officials said. State Officials Face Lawsuit DES MOINES for- mer stole computer operalor has filed a lawsuit against two state officials claiming a sec- tion of tho Iowa code is un- constitutional. Larry Lee Lawtun of Hart- ford filed (he suit in Polk county district court, lie claimed Ihe section of the Iowa code lhal allows proba- tionary stale employes to be dismissed wilhoul a hearing is unconstitutional. Lawton worked for Ihe state's data processing divi- sion from Feb. 1 lo July 1 as a probationary employe. He filed the suil against Slale Comptroller Maryin Selden and Verne II. Tanner, a data processing administra- tor. Mini-Convention May Consider Stands By Harrison Wcbcr DES MOINES When the Demo- crats hold their mini-convention in Kansas City next week, the big controversy may be something no one contemplated several months ago. The question at hand may well bo whether to take a stand on this country's national priorities, such as energy and the economy. Purpose of the mini-convention as ap- proved by delegates attending the 1972 Demo- cratic national convention was to resolve, if possible, policy and organization issues. But some Democratic leaders believe that many of the party reform issues do not have the intensity that they had two years ago and therefore say the conference should be devot- ed to national questions. Moot Points One of those leaders is Democratic State Chairman Tom Whitney of Des Moines. "The reform issues are less heated and less emotional today; things that were open to serious debate in 1972 are practically moot Whitney declared. "Proportionate repreentation, for exam- ple, was a great controversy, but now it has become an accepted fact within the Whitney said. About half of the 38 member Iowa delega- tion met in Des Moines last week and a straw vote was taken as to whether the delegation favored moving into non-organizational ques- tions at the Kansas City meeting, Dec. 6-8. Whitney said there was "overwhelming sup- port" among these delegates to move into this area. The original purpose of the Democratic mini-convention, Whitney added, was to "fundamentally guarantee and ensure through the organizational structure that ev- ery citizen will have 'equal opportunity and equal access to the Democratic parly's politi- cal processes. Reform Oriented "Although the Republican party is run- ning somewhat behind us in reforms, both the Republican and Democratic parties in Iowa have been reform oriented. "The processes we have in Iowa today arc what a great many people are going to Kansas City to fight for and many of the is- sues are very real say to someone from Georgia or Texas or somewhere else where they are old hat here. We fought those fights a long time ago." Ultimately, Whitney said, the make-up of the various delegations will determine what direction the convention will lake." Whether the issues or reform are going to be the center of controversy at the convention de- pends to a large extent on the unidentifiable delegates, whether they are conservative, moderate or liberal. If the major advocates of party reform, the liberals, are in control of the convention, then several significant is- sues dealing with reform within the parly will be the center of Whitney surmised. The Iowa delegation is viewed nationally as being in the forefront of the pro-reform effort. Delegates attending from the First district will be Elliot Anderson, Burlington; Doris Kolvoord, Davenport; and David Ferret, Iowa City. Second district delegates are Suki Cell, Mt. Vernon; Janet Fraser, Monticello; Kurt Meyer, St. Ansgar; and Bob Rundy, Du- buque. Delgates from the Third district arc Willie O'Neal, Waterloo; Mary O'Halloran, Cedar Falls; and Betty McCarthy, Osage. Regional Centers Streamline Health Care By Larry Murphy Drake University Journollsm Studenl DES MOINES (IDPA) If you are an emergency patient, the Iowa Community Emer- gency Planning program wants to streamline your med- ical care. The program is in the proc- ess of establishing 16 regional centers in the state to coordi- nate counties' handling of emergencies. The first center will go into operation next summer in Re- gion 10, consisting of seven counties around Cedar Rapids, and Region 11, eight counties around Des Moines. Region 8, centered around Dubuque, and Region 12, around Carroll, are lenlalively scheduled for operation in the summer of 1976. The Community Emergency Planning program, which is federally funded, started as an autonomous unit in Septem- ber, 1971. Originally, it seemed from the highway safety act of 1966 as an advisory group for the funding of county ambulances and medical equipment. Program Expands But it expanded after dis- covering training, technical and planning needs in the Iowa Emergency Medical Services (EMS) operations throughout the state. EMS covers all county emergencies, from care of the man who collapses of a heart arrest while mowing the lawn, to the coordination of medical services in times of disaster. "There has never been any state said Al Hunter, administrative and planning head for the Emergency Planning pro- gram. "This has been one of our problems. "This is why we end up with one ambulance serving a county of popula- tion and then wind up with six or seven ambulances in a county of population because there hasn't been any planning or coordination, it becomes extremely expen- Assist Services The program's staff cons- ists of three professionals and two secretaries. They assist hospitals, ambulance services, community law enforcement agencies and Civil Defense nits in coordinating all phases of emergency planning. For example, 38 percent of Iowa hospitals in 1971 didn't meet federal guidelines for emergency units (this survey evalated only the emergency departments of the hospitals, not the over-all As a result, the EEP set up a four-class categorisation of Iowa hospitals, ranging from University hosptal in Iowa Ci- ty on top as a complete emergency facility, to the lowest class of minimal or no emergency medical facilities available. This information will be available to the region- al headquarters for reference in times of emergency. The program has no power of enforcement, but evaluates county programs and at- tempts, through disaster drills and staged emergencies, to show a community the value of its emergency plans. Introduce Bill Several Iowa legislators are considering introduction of a bill in the 1975 session to re- quire licensing of ambulance services and set minimal personnel standards. This would give the EPP some legal clout to enforce parts of federal standards on ambulance services. Hunter explained how, for example, Region 11, with its center in Des Moines, would act in an emergency. Telephone calls for ambul- ances in the region would be channeled through one number to Des Moines. The dispatcher, who would be trained in analyzing emer- gency needs, would send the nearest and most appropriate ambulance to the scone. He would also alert law en- forcement agencies of any traffic hazards resulting from the situation and notify the ap- propriate hospital. Depending on the size of the emergency, other regions might be noti- fied for further aid. Help Counties But the EPP's short-term plans are to help counties develop systems with at least one medically-trained assist- ant on each ambulance and to create rescue squads trained and equipped to meet federal regulations. Hunter told of one Iowa doc- tor's experience. The doctor lived in a small community with medically- trained assistants on the ambulance. In his last year there, four men treated for cardiac arrests were success- fully cared for and revived by the emergency system. But he moved to a new community which had no trained technicians on the ambulaues. No one at the hospital or any of the doctor's associates could remember anyone, in the same situation as the previous county, being saved if they din't reach the hospital conscious, Hunter said; Fear Expense "There was a lot of initial resistance and misunderstand- ing because of fear of ex- said Hunter. "But once we are able to explain what it is all about, then we've had little resistance." A new ambulance can range from with minimal equipment and a few acces- sories, to with many types of medical machines heart machine, Hunter concluded: "We have ha'd a great number of ambulances purchased in the last year the picture is changing. No longer do counties rely on funeral homes to provide ambulance services, because many of them are getting out of the business It's be- come apparent the only way is to go countywidc and to cor- dinate that service." Budgets Would Create Deficits DES MOINES Gov. Robert Ray and State Comp- troller Marvin Selden told state agency heads thai Ihey Bandit Robs Card Players FORT DODGE (UPI) Po- lice here today were looking for a ski-masked bandit who robbed four men of about while Ihey were playing cards in a tavern in the downtown area of the city late Wednes- day. Police said the men Clay Gordon, Dean Treloar, Dave Rhoades and James Gentile said they were forced to turn over their billfolds, the money on the table and take off their clothes. The hold-up here is the (bird such card game robbery in the state in the past month. have submitted proposed budgets (hat would throw the state treasury into a million deficit in two years: The state currently is million in the black. Ray and Selden made the fig ures public Wednesday as they briefed 130 state agency heads on the budget-making process for this year. Although neither said so ex- plicitly, Ray and Selden strongly indicated Ihe re- quests are in for substantial trimming before being sub- mitted to the Iowa Legisla- ture. Selden said if the budget requests were submitted as proposed, the Ray administra- tion is required by law to propose legislation for a tax increase lo offset the deficit. DEQ May Seek DES MOINES A deadlines, applications for the stale official says Ihe Iowa exemption must bo on file Department of Environmental 'he DEQ by Jan. 10, and Quality (DEQ) may have to 'he department must present ask Ihe Iowa legislature lo ils certification to the state extend ils deadlines on ap- revenue department by Feb. plications for pollution control 1 FINE MEATS 1 FINE MEATS 806 34th St. S.E. L 1944 42nd St. N.E. 365-8828 W 393-3007 tax exemptions. Committee Chairman Rob-The legislature passed a law crt Buckmasler of IN THE PDQ STORES MEAT DEPARTMENTS OPEN TILL 7PM lions from property lax on impossibility for the depart-equipment used to abate air mcnt to complete ils ccrtlficn-and waler pollution. lilm wllhin 20 days of the fil-Hcarings Officer J. Edward inK deadline." Brown lold a taking orders for Fresh HOLIDAY POULTRY Trenkler Old Faihloned Q (fli 1 A HOT DOGS DR. RONALD S. Minute A .m A A STEAKS :r. 153O 1ST. AVE. N.E. OFFICE HOURS TELEPHONE: BY APPOINTMENT .MILWAUKEE S1 19   

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