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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 27, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Gazelle: Wed.. Nov. 'it. )97i Joan Lipsky: Gains Mode for Women in Elections By Ann Schrader In summarizing the recent elections, Rep. .loan Lipsky (H-C.U.) noted that there were more women running for and were elected to county and stale offices in Iowa than ever be- fore in history. She made Iho remarks at a meeting of the Cedar Rapids Women's Caucus (National Organization of Women) Tuesday night at the Women's Resource Center. The center is located on the third floor of the YWCA. "The election means two things, Hep. Lipsky said. "One, women are willing serve and work and two, the people around these women are supportive. Cooperation Is Needed "Cooperation is needed in work, home and personal relationships. The reaction of hus- bands and employers are evidence of a changing clime of she said. "Groups like the caucus have aided women because of the support these groups can lend." Last year there were ten women in the legislature with six in the house and four in the senate, Rep. Lipsky explained. "This year there is the same number in the senate and ten women in the house. Significant gains have been made, but the representation (of women) is less than ten percent of the legislative body of which there are 150 members. We have a long way to go to- being representative of the population." She said the election also means a great deal in terms of women's issues. "No one can speak for us as well as one who understands our problems or Issues. We must be present very visibly urn! audibly. "One of the problems with women's is- sues, women in government or women in public life, Is a surge of activity before an el- ection followed by a period of she said. Vital Part Of Movement which haven't ratified KltA, like Illinois. Things which happen in Iowa are things that get reported in the Illinois Hep. Lipsky explained. She said that every other stale, like Iowa, has a vocal opposition to _ERA. "It isn't set- tled until everyone ratifies and il becomes part of our Constitution." Groups like the caucus "are a vital part of Ihe movement now. Success will depend on slaying power. You (the caucus) are very big in women's leadership because your group culs across Rep. Lipsky said. She said she is very concerned about the future of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) although it has been passed by the Iowa legislature. Thirty-three slates have rat- ified ERA with five more slates needed to make the amendment part of the Constitu- tion. "The last five states will be the most dif- ficult. We can't tel down and forget because we were among the first to ratify. But the question is: What are the opponents doing in a stale like she noled. "They (ERA opponenls) are very active. Hundreds of thousands of women supported ERA and are still supporting she outpouring of support isn't as ev- ident in what you read. "The opponenls aren't going to affect the Iowa legislature because it takes an amendment to recind an amendment. Bui the opponents' efforts will affect our sister slates Licensing Of Day Care On oilier women's issues before Ihe leg- islature, Rep. Lipsky said that (here is a push for legislation on the licensing of day care in Iowa. She said Ihe governor has ap- pointed a special lask force to deal with the issue. "This will be a priority item and has wide partisan support. A bill has been drafted and will come up early in (he legislative she predicted. Rep. Lipsky noled lhal there aren't many specific bills on women's issues waiting ac- tion lliis session because "we were forlunale in passing many bills last session such as the 'de-sexing code' and the elimination of cor- roboralion in the rape bill." Rep. Lipsky said she has been thinking about terming rape as assault because "many women aren't being embarrassed and humiliated al trial, but at the hands of police authorities. If it's classified as assault il doesn't have the same kind of emotional impact." The proposed bill would encourage the fil- ing of charges and would greatly increase the number of reported cases, she said, although she said she expects some opposition to the measure. 'ear Society DEAR ABBY: Please tell me if I was wrong or right. There was a TV program (a special) 1 had looked forward to seeing for a long lime. I was inviled to play cards that night, but declined because 1 wanted to see il. About 15 minulcs before it was lo go on, in came my sis- ler-in-law and mother-in-law. They don't live very far from me and we see each other quite often. I get along fine with my sister-in-law, but my mother-in-law is a different story. I said, "I'll fix coffee, bul I so want to see a TV program which goes on in 15 minutes. Please slay and watch it with My mother-in-law said, "Don't bother making coffee, we can't stay." Then she pulled my sister-in-law by the arm and they left. The next day my sister-in- law called and said, "For a smart woman, you sure are Then she laid me out because I didn't just skip the TV program aiid enterlain her and Mom. I want your opinion of this incident. BURNING IN BOSTON DEAR BURNING: I don't know why anyone (relative or otherwise) should drop in un- invited and unannounced and expect to be treated like an invited guest. They should have called first and given you a chance to say, "I'm sorry, but I have plans. How about tomorrow DEAR ABBY: I am a -52- year-old man who is normal in every respect, but I am 4'11" and weigh 115 pounds. 1 am single and very lonely. I heard that (here was a na- tional convention of the Little People of America in Asliville, N. C., last July. I would have gone, but il was over by Ihe time I learned about it. If you use Ibis in Hie paper, please omit my name and town because some normal- sized people tend lo make fun of us little people although they mean uo harm. If you have any information about this club for little peo- ple, I would certainly appre- ciate it. LITTLE GUY DKAR LITTLE: I'll try. An- yone out there want to do a lot of IIUIc people a big favor? Write it Ahby with the In- formation about the Little People ol America club and I'll print It. For Abby's booklet, "How lo Have a Lovely send Jl lo Ahlftnll Huron, 132 Uisky Hfvorly Hills, Calif. S02I2. Nancy Visits Farm Mrs. Nancy Kissinger, wife of Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, appears amused by dairy cows as she hugs herself in the cold during a visit Tuesday to the China-Albania People's commune near Peking. PEKING (UPI) Henry A. Kissinger's wife and children displayed Tuesday the secre- tary of slate's diplomacy when the force feeding of the ducks began. Nancy Kissinger and Ihe children, Elizabeth, and David, had been driven in red flag limousines lo Hie China-Al- bania people's commune for an afternoon outing. The sight of fine feathered ducks waddling about pens tickled them. David pulled out a pocket camera and began clicking. Nancy Kissinger, hugging herself in the cold in her fur coal, smiled. Elizabeth smiled. A communal official beck- oned them into a brick build- ing nearby. Here incubators warmed up eggs for hatching more of the birds needed lo supply China wllh its great la- ble delicacy. Still smiles. Then across Ihe grassless yard lo another building. Here, a young lady in while knell and snatched a duck by the neck and jammed its mouth onto a six-inch rubber pipe. The pipe poured food into Ihe duck. Tlie girl (hen released Ihe duck which wobbled away. She snatched up another. Elizabeth's eyes widened. David kept bis camera in bis pocket. Nancy Kissinger kepi diplo- matically mum and did not gesture (lie children nearer as she had at most farm sights. Mrs. George Bush, wife of the American ambassador, pretended to be more interest- ed in the pot bellied stove across (he room. Outside, Elizabeth re- marked that force feeding of animals is not allowed in America. The parly walked on lo the dairy cattle. Out came David's camera. FLAVORFUL SOUPS Want to give soups richer flavor? Fold cheese cubes or shredded Cheddar Into the soup just before s-ervlng. An- other way is to garnish with a dollop of dairy sour cream or whipped cream, Still another way is to add milk to con- densed soups such as cream of lomalo, celery, mushroom or chicken, replacing Ihe walcr oflen staled bv Ihe directions. Top-Ranking Woman To Quit Post WASHINGTON (AP) Presidential counselor Anne Armstrong, lop-ranking wom- an in the Ford and Nixon administrations, is leaving her While House posl by Jan. 1, sources say. Mrs. Armslrong went home to her Texas ranch for Thanksgiving after a meeling Tuesday willi President Ford. It was later learned lhal though the meeling with Ford was on business mailers, Mrs. Armstrong's desire to leave the administration for person- al reasons had already been conveyed lo Ihe President. By Ihe end of Ihe year, Mrs. Turn off Television When Not In Use You can cut down on Ihe home entertainment bill (he use of radio, television and stereo if you remember lo lurn them off when no one is in the room watching or listening. Televisions with an "Instant on" feature use electricity 24 hours a day keeping com- ponents healed and ready for npcralinn. Unplug Ibese when they will not be used for an extended period. Armslrong will have served nearly two years in the 500-a-year counselor's job lhal former President Richard M. Nixon gave her with cabinet rank. She had been co-chairman of the Republican national committee from January, 1971, until she started the White I louse job Jan. 1973. Mrs. Armstrong has been given a wide range of assign- ment in domestic fields, including Ihe bicentennial and areas of special interest to women. She promoted passage of Ihe Equal Rights Amendment and recruitment of women to lop-level posts in government, a project that recently lias been lagging at Ihe White House. There was no immediate indication whether Ford plans to replace Mrs. Armstrong willi anolber woman in thai posl. The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S.A. Giving Thanks AP Wlrcpholo Three-year-old Pamela Billie and other members of the Miccosukee Indi- an tribe feasted with their guests this week at an Indian mission in the Flor- ida Everglades. The meeting symbolized the first Thanksgiving when Indians and Pilgrims feasted together. Balloon Blowing May Avoid Brain Damage By Richard P. .loncs MADISON, Wis. A University of Wisconsin re- searcher believes fewer infants might suffer brain damage during birth if their mothers are given balloons or bag-like devices to blow up (luring delivery. Doctors have known for almost a decade lhal heavy brea- thing by a frightened mother in labor can cause brain dam- age to babies but they don't know exactly why. Dr. John Rankin says he believes he can explain the problem and suggests doctors include among their instru- a simple rubber balloon. He says il would restore a mother's normal breathing pattern. Add Content Rankin and assistant Terry Phernelton have built a mod- el which Rankin said shows that heavy breathing changes Ihe acid content of a mother's blood and prevents the flow of ox- ygen. Doctors have assumed infants were denied oxygen be- cause of constriction or a snapping shut of blood vessels once the placenta or umbilical cord come under pressure. They have criticized natural child birth methods for causing part of the problem of heavy breathing, or liypervenlilalion. Rankin, 37, an Australian-born physiologist, said his model consists of two masses of fine rubber capillaries and tubing that resemble the placenta and the lungs of the mother ai.d child. All this is contained in a large glass con- tainer. Air is pumped into the container and blood into the lilb- ing and capillaries lo simulate normal operation of the lungs, according lo Rankin. To simulate a frightened mother's heavy breathing, more oxygen is pumped into the container. Rankin said (his lowers the carbon dioxide pressure in the blood and it becomes more acidic. Once the blood is less acidic, oxygen carried by the hemoglobin or red blood cells is bound much tighter and the lightly bound oxygen cannot pass through the placenta lo the felus. The condition is known as alkalosis. Restores Pattern When it occurs, Rankin said, doctors should give the balloon lo the mother. By having the woman breathe into a balloon or air bag, and rebreathe what was exhaled, doctors could restore a normal breathing pattern. "You've got to slow them down Rankin said. "It's very simple." lie said many people have experienced alkalosis. a boy is trying lo swim the length of a pool un- derwater, he'll hyperventilate before going in. He'll feel lliings tingling in his fingers. Thai's alkalinity." Rankin said data from German delivery wards showed almost half the cases becomes slightly alkaline. He said data measuring damage wasn't available, but added the damage usually was not severe. Bridge Grand Slam Club Winners of an open game of duplicate bridge played Tues- day at the Montrose hotel were: North-south Grace Eyinan and Ova Jenkins, first, and Mrs. Howard Wilfong and Mrs. F.G. Johnson, second; east-west Mr. and Mrs. Royce McCray, first, and Thomas Sawyer and Robert Scitz, second. Winners of the newcomers game, also duplicate bridge, were: North-south Lucille Nadel and Mary Earley, first, and Tlieima Whorton and Jeanette Nelson; cast-west Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hel- lenlhal, first, and Pal Howard and Shirley Moore, second. The next game will be played Tuesday at at the hold. The newcomers game will feature a hand of computer bridge. love 25... the reason for staying together. You are invited tit a Candlelight Christmas Preview Friday. Xovfmhvr tt p.m.-it p.m. 4-SEASONS FLORIST 3028 Mt. Vernon Rd. S.E. 363-.' 885 THANKSGIVING TABLE Wishing our friends and Thanksgiving All Fabric Your Dependable Cleaners 214 First St. S.W. 4870 J St. SW   

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