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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 25, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Clomly 1 'I'liCKday. tonight 20. Highs Tiles. liny In low TOUJM10 92 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS CKDAK KAPIDS, IOWA, MONDAY. NOVEMBER 25, ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Ford-Brezhnev Accord On Arms Ceilings Praised WASHINGTON (AP) P ident Ford returned from his So- viet summit mooting with an arms-reduction pact that an aide called "one of the most sig- nificant agreements since World war II." The pact reached between the President and Soviet Commu- nist leader Leonid Brezhnev in Vladivostok placed a numerical limit on the number of U. S. and Soviet intercontinental ballistic missiles and submarine- launched missiles carrying mul- t i p 1 e independently warheads. targeted The agreement includes bombers for the first time. Ceilings Accepted It's understood that Ford is awaiting a written Soviet state- ment detailing the exact terms of the verbal agreement before announcing publicly the numbers of warheads and mis- siles systems involved. "Ceilings on the strategic forces of both nations have been Ford told an airport welcoming audience Sunday night. "A good agreement that will serve the interests of the U.S. and the Soviet Union is within our grasp." Ford will brief Democratic predicted that would produce a To iy ADDIS ABABA Ethiopia (UPI) The Ethiopian military government plans to follow up Ihe weekend executions of CO former officials by court-mar- tialing an estimated HO one- time leaders seized on corrup- tion charges. Radio Ethiopia said the new military trials would lake place immediately, but the govern- ment-run station did not say whelher the regime would ask for more death penalties. The radio said 00 of an es- timated 200 former officials ar- rested by the military rulers since coming to power last Feb- ruary were put lo death for "crimes against the Ethiopian people." Brought Immediately "Other officials now in dcten- lion on corruption charges, will be brought immediately before the general and district courts- the station said Sun- day in three identical broad- casts. T h o s c executed included members of the deposed royal family and the general who led the overthrow of former Emper- The council called Ihc execu- tions "an act of justice" against persons who had sought to disrupt the country's popular movement, abuse authority or enrich themselves while this East African nation of 27 million was racked by famine and pov- erty. Selassie's FalcY The executed included Gen. Aman And'Oin. chairman of the council since it took over from the 82-year-old emperor two months ago. There was no word on the falc of Selassie himself. Selassie's son, Crown Prince Asfa Wossen, 58, designated by (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) and Republican congressional leaders Tuesday and othci members of congress later li- the week. One official indicated the President might reveal de- tails of the agreement in a na- tionwide television address with- in a week. Next Year White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen, who praised the agreement as one of the most significant since World war the summit SALT agree- ment thai almost certainly will be signed next year. Former President Nixon "could not achieve this in five years" but Ford "achieved it in three Nessen said. The agreement was called a breakthrough in strategic arms negotiations by Secretary of Slate Kissinger. Kissinger told reporters in Vladivostok that the lolal number of Soviet mis- siles, bombers and other deliv- ery systems would be below current Soviet strength. U. S. missiles in place in Europe would not be counted againsl the American total, he said. Communique The Soviet Union has more and larger missiles, while the more multiple war- and intercontinental Prosecution Rests In Cover-Up Trial WASHINGTON, (AP) peace." prosecution Monday rested its -phe case againsl the five defendants in the Watergate cover-up trial. In the almost six weeks since they were selected, the jurors heard 28 prosecution witnesses and more than 20 hours of While has heads bombers. In a joinl communique signed by Ford and Brezhnev in Vladi- vostok, a Soviet port city on the eastern coast, the two nations said a long-term nuclear weap- ons agreement "would be a sig- lificanl contribution to improv- ing relations between the U. S. and Ihc USSR, lo reducing the [danger of war and to enhancing House lapcs. or ITailc Selassie. Residents of I Ihe capital expressed shock liie speed and extenl of the vio- lent removal of so many promi- nent people, but there was no evidence of unrest. The armed forces were put on alert. Radio Ethiopia announced the executions early Sunday, then resumed normal programming. By nightfall, there were only a few pedestrians and motorists on the streets of the capital. i Administration. The executions, at midnight j Zarb, 39. will succeed John Saturday, were ordered by thejsawhill, who was fired from the 120-member military council, now headed by 30-year-old Maj. Announces New FEA Chief WASHINGTON (AP) Pres- ident Ford announced Monday he will nominate Frank Zarb, now an associate director of the Office of Management and Budg- head the Federal Energy communique also, ex- pressed the leaders' concern aboul "Ihc dangerous situation" in the Middle Easl and reaf- firmed an inlenlion to bring about "a just and lasting peace." It called for resumption of the Geneva peace conference as soon as possible. Praise for Japan Ford was greeted upon arriv- Mengislu Tlaile Miriam, known officer. little- post, which is considered by Ford one of the most important energy posts of his administra- tion. al Andrews air force base by his wife, who did nc pany him on the journey be- cause she is recovering from breasl cancer surgery, and one of his daughters, Susan, who brought along the family's dog, Liberty. Senate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield, Senate Republi- can Leader Hugh Scott, House Speaker Carl Albert and U. N. Ambassador John Scali also at- Wlrcphoto CREW RELEASED All ended well for the crew of the hijacked British VC-IO as they celebrated their release in Tunis Monday. From left: First Officer Michael Wood, Engineer Officer Frank Sharpies and Captain James Futcher. WASHINGTON (AP) Rap- the Soviet Union and some of lion for four consecutive years, idly rising prices on new sugar the Arab nations "lo hoard or i depicting inventories and push- produced "very large drive up Ihe price of sugar. I ing up prices. Second Cancer Operation for Mrs. Rockefeller NEW YORK (AP) Happy Rockefeller underwent hours of surgery Monday for the re- moval of her right breast, onlyu [ive weeks after losing her can- cerous left breast in operation. A hospital spokesman said.shejpricc of sugar (his year, showed jlion that indicates Ihe Kussians'alion" need lo be examined, came out of surgery at II "net returns per unit of'and the Arab nations have been have produced "very large drive up Ihe price of si windfall gains" for all sectors ofiThat is one idea we can clis the industry, an analysis by despite Jargi dismiss large rc- But, he said, that explanation is incomplete. The role of Council WaSc and Pricc Hla- ccnt sugar for Monday. [countries. rumflrs of commcrcia stau study, presented oiij But Hep. Peyser iH-N.V.j, mihoarding of sugar "whether th companies are reaping sive profits from this situ a similar j fjrst day a testimony prepared for the sugar ci ling into Ihc quadrupling of the j hearing, said, "I have informa- excessive TUNIS (AP) t- Tunisian of- ficials Monday arrested four Palestinian hijackers who aban- doned their threal to blow up a British airliner and ils Ihree crew members in return for a promise of asylum. The four left the plane with seven other terrorists who had been flown to Tunis from Egypt and the Netherlands as ransom for the plane, its three-crew and more than 40 passengers. The guerillas used as shields the three flight crew members, the lasl of the hoslages, as they left the plane. They later turned them over unharmed to Tuni- sian officials. Asked Custody The Palestine Liberation Or- ganization meanwhile asked the Tunisian government Monday for custody of the four guerillas, the Palestine news agency said. The news agency said the PLO leadership lias decided to form a special group which will fly lo Tunis soon lo talk with Ihe hijackers and investigale circumslances of Ihe incident Ihey said damaged Ihe Arab cause. Asked under whal condilions :hc government arrested Ihe hi- jackers after promising asylum, Foreign Minister Habib Chatti said hia government had only 'verbally accepted the (hi- jackers') conditions. "There was no agreement, even less any written conditions or a Chatti said. "Safe Place" and spent 45 minutes in the re- covery room. The surgical team began Ihe operation at a.m. Shortly afler she cnlercd Me- sugar for both the production attempting, and to some degree! fioveriimnnl Role norial hospital on Sunday hcrijn 1974 jn lusband, Vice-prcsidcnt-desig-jrccenl history." natc Nelson Rockefeller, said al; a news conference thai her! 'ramc good." "She has total confidence Simcn or he nurses, doctors and the I hearings by staling that his lis hosrii- veslicfilinn has foum! "no and processing segments of succeeded already, in; "The American housewife de- domestic sugar cane and sugarilransacling a sugar deal that is serves lo know what lies behind beet industries are much highcrjcomparable lo the wheat dcali'l'cs c stupendous price in- creases. She has a right to know ,n whether she's gelling a 'fail- any year iiijmade a year ago in Ihc U. S. "This is a deliberate effort Soviets To lilame'.' i further 'ramc of mind was "pretly That report by Bruce Walter was presented after Treasury "Tins is a cleliherale cllorl lo: urlher create financial prob- or Jusl a shakedown. And L-ms for the poorer counlries in wc. inlcnd lo flml the world and generally lend to Simon said. .the economic crisis that jnanyi. Virginia Knaucr, the Pres- are lacing due to the ident's special assistant for con- whole atmosphere in this hosp'i-lvesligalion has found Rockefeller said. idcncc of a conspiracy" The former governor of York added that his own frame no evi- betwecn price of oil." Consumption sumer affairs, said a principal confusion in consumers' minds results from the role of govern- (Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.) of mind "is to thank God that this was found out prior to the spread of it to the resl of her body." Mrs. Rockefeller's Icfl breasl was removed Oct. 17 at the hos- pital. At thai time, a biopsy was performed on Mrs. Rocke-l DUBUQUE, Iowa Simcn said Ihe hearings were menl programs and Iradc re- pealled because "we are detcr-islrainls when the price rise is ot lo Ihe hcllcm explained in terms of ie for Senate Seat mined lo the rising controversy over free-market supply and demand sugar prices." forces. The secretary said that a "This question of contrived major cause of Ihc problem is versus real scarcity to me is the the fact that world consumption mosl important area this hcar- llas exceeded produc- can shed light she said feller's right breast. Rockefeller said technicians found the next (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) buque county district cam! j Judge Thomas H. Nelson ruled! First Does "as Mucfi as ff Barnard Gives CAPE TOWN. South Africa (APi Heart transplant pio- neer Chrisliaan Barnard Mon- day morning implanted a sec- ond heart inside a 58-year-old man in a milestone operation, (Ironic Schniir hospital an- nounced. The patient, who was not identified, was reported in salis- faclnry condition in Ihe inten- sive (MIT unit. Both hearts wore boalinj! lo.uelher. a hospital spokesman said. Barnard's heart transplant leani. making ils llth operation but ils fir.sl to implant a heart without removing Ihc patient's diseased hearl. began work al midnighl Sunday. The brail usrd in operalion was of a 10-yi'ai-old ('ape Town killed in an aci-idi-nt .Sunday. Kept Heating The spokesman said thai .'iflcr HT rhild was clinically dead, her hearl was kepi healing ar- tificially insuli' her body mini Ihi- Mirgcry could begin. The South African Press Assn. said the recipient is mar- ried with children. Hospital authorities identified ncilher the recipient nor the donor. Barnard performed the first heart transplant operation on Dec. :i. at Groolc Schuur. lie was assisted in his latest by his brother, Or. Marius Barnard, and the Grnote Schuur transplant team. The patient's original hearl was left in Ihe body, and the second heart was transplanted help Ihe damaged heart and "improve Ihe patient's blood accnrding lo Ihe hospital spokesman. l.cft Side "The old heart takes care of as much as il can. Whiil il can'l handle is taken care of by Ihe new Barnard said at a news conference. Barnard said the right .side (if Ihe patients' ortn heart was normal bill that multiple heart altacks iiad practically de- stroyed the left side. Barnard said he connected Ihe atriums and aortas and that when pressure built up. blood flowed inlo Ihc donor hearl. Each hearl has ils own pace- maker, he said, and lechniqucs are being worked out lo syn- chronize Ihe Iwo heartbeats. Bridges Not Hunied Barnard said Ihe patient, who was older than he would have preferred, was conscious and his blood circulation excellent. "I was very surprised lo see hnw Ihc aclinn of Ihe hearl had improved." Ihe surgeon said. He said there still could be problems of the body rejecting the new hearl, as ill pasl trans- plants. Bui Ihc added hearl, he said, gives "a little, leeway." "We haven't burned our bridg- es. If necessary. Ihe new heart could he removed." he added. that stale Sen. Gene Kennedy, (D-Dubuque) is ineligible to run for Ihe seat vacated by Con-; 'grcssman-eiect Michael Blouin. j j Kennedy, a two-term slate, 'senator who did not seek re-i __ d R election earlier llns negotiators, i improved package." Ihe DemocraUc {nm The orjginalb propOM, an. (administration, have won Nov. 13 contained wage (her concessions from the benefit increases of about industry in a proposed new 50 pel-cent over Ihe three-year three-year contract. But council members UMW President Arnold Miller i told Miller to reopen negotia- Carr of Dubuque and I.ele "f and seek major changes, rioli of Dubuque "s wage increases higher wllicri balked at an ear-jihan the percent proposed for, MIL uiium ut LUUIII iJt-uiu i.. rujcirv irr'innnmnnlR Tnmr her proposal. Ihe council must Ihe first year. essary air.mgemcnis, inior- approve any agreement before j a slatemenl Sunday nation for the spocia for senate dislricl 10. The election is scheduled for Dec. 30. The only other announced j candidates are stale Hep. Bob! It was not clear what would happen to the seven ransomed terrorists. "They are in a safe Challi said. "A decision on what to do with them will be :akcn later in consultation with .he other Arab governments and .he Palestine Liberation Organi- sation." He said il was premature lo ay whether the hijackers would be placed on trial for murdering i German passenger on Satur- day. Tunisian authorities said the lunmcn's main preoccupation vas to get guarantees that vould allow them to escape the vengeance of the Palesllne Lib- eration Organization which said he hijackers were criminals laid by Iraq and would be made o "pay" for the allack againsl nnocent passengers. Chatti paid a special tribute to the role played in Ihe tense ne- gotiations by Salah Khalaf, re- puted leader of the Black Sep- tember terrorist group and sec- ond in command of the Al Fatah organization. Khaiaf was sent to Tunis on Friday by PLO leader Yasir Arafal to help with negoti- ations. The Palestinians Icfl the air- craft after Tunisia's information director announced that Ihe governmenl had decided lo granl them asylum. "Welcoming" "The principle of welcoming !he Palestinians in Tunisia has been approved. Negotiations arc continuing to determine the nec- cralic party will chouse a candi- date Monday night to fill Ihc seal that Blouin gave up M" to the Miller and chief industry this month afler he defeated jlulls members, said Slate Sen. Tern Hiley for on slnke Nov. 12. i both sides had "agreed in prin- dislricl .seal. Nelson ruled that Kennedy fulfilled the residency I'nion and industry officials, ciple on improvements in the to discuss details of the tentative contract package. hammered oul Sunday mghl. A union spokes who ran unsuccessfully for gov- ernor. Kennedy served from senate dislricl II. which adjoins the district that Blouin rcpii-.ienlcd. Still Undecided MONTGOMERY. Ala. (API Governor George Wallace, who :ran for President on ;i Ihinl- parly ticket in he is si ill undecided whether lo run in IIITli. Finalizing Language "We intend lo devote Monday he released until afler the bar-; In Ihc task of finalizing contract anguage .so that a complete and final document can he presented the ratification process with- Out the statement said. Treasury Secretary Miller issued a separate slale- who played a role in ncgotiatingimenl praising chief federal nc- W. J, Usery. "His even- handed treatment of both par- ities bridged the difficult gap be- 'twcen us al Ihe crucial man said its contents would nol gaining council meets, on Tui-s-i day at the earliest. "Improved Package" Today's Chuckle. Mow that the telephone com- pany has started lo introduce television phones wr may L'ct ;i lot uT pleasure nut oi ,ili- ing wrong mimlws i Miller said. t.'scry and Simon intervened afler noting that the mine workers and Ihc industry j Television been unable- to resolve their j Want Ads 'diffcrr-nccs themselves m a t i o n Director Abdclkim Moussa said. The guerillas and their hos- tages left the plane less than an (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) Today's Index Comics .....................17 Courthouse ...................1 Crossword ..................17 Daily Itecord.................1 Deaths ......................3 Editorial Knrni 11 Financial ..................18 Marion ....................12 Movies .....................10 Society 8 Sports..................l.Vlli Stntc .............7 ...........20-23   

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