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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 23, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                8____The Cedar Kaplds Gazette: Sat., Nov. 2.1, 1971 How Vocational School flriH By Sylvia an extravagant are key rules to Administration for instance, if if you so decide, cancel NEW YORK be a warning signal (hat approve such schools. in a school home study contract. schools and home is using for the Federal that a veteran is courses fill a vital role tactics. The ad free Gl bill benefits to attend whether you can to the Accreditation America's educational how badly needed lo Choosing a school does financing. If Institutional Eligibility They can be of enormous In whatever field (Consumer that but then can't find U. S. Office of Education, lo you which is, of how high arc Pueblo, Colo., do you forfeit Maryland Ave., Washing- the fundamental reason the paid, how out from students alert to the .fact that D. C., 20202, if you want to dustry has ballooned to a can be placed attended the school no indication whatsoever out if any vocational ti-billion-dollar size and why rated the courses and quality of instruction what, if any, is formally accredited whopping come-on even may help (he instruction In fact, some of the service is offered and whether or not it is if you want any details on are enrolled today in lifetime placement. getting a job. Check in vocational validity of degrees offered private vocational schools may claim thai only Belter Business in the whether such a school. nation number of prospective offers any But the bitter fact also is be accepted, even thai a diploma will be the same as they do and would hire-graduates of the school, out whether any advertised salaries on post if so, how the terms compare to those available Important, carefully study any contract before you many schools simply do training would affect that are advertised it, and if you don't under- live up to their promise to costs may be salary, how level pay or any sentence in it, insist you a vocational An ad may actually have paid to that if you are a answers lhal satisfy you. How, then, do you find creditability of the during Ihe last or an eligible spouse if you suspect a swindle, honest touled by such thoroughly aware thai whether any taking a the details at once lo the What yardsticks can you use "highly qualified government does fee you are required to course under the GI office of the Federal judge a school or vocational schools refundable and under you have a 10-day Commission Ihe dence for their quality. Nor does What period during which Protection Agency. Air Force Flying Fish Project Uncovered By Dick West WASHINGTON (UPI) Anyone exposed to the daily outpourings of congressnon quickly becomes dismayed over how myopic Ihey are. At hand is a classic illustra- tion a press release from Hep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) ac- cusing the air force of main- taining five aircraft in Labrador for fishing trips. Noting that Ihe planes, which cost a year to operate, are carried in the budgel under "strategic offensive opera- Aspin aspersively com- ments: "There is no way these planes could be used in strategic operations. They arc too old, loo small and nol even bombers." True Significance Really now! It's incredible how oflen our lawgivers miss Ihe true significance of matters that pop up under their very noses. To assume that frequent flights lo Labrador fishing resorls have no slralcgic implications is terribly dim- sighted. Apparently Aspin has not seen the movie "The Day of the Dolphin." Although its account of a military plot to train dolphins Reward for Big George! Killing Burglar Worries Police to blow up ships is fictitious, the movie is by no means en- tirely without basis in fact. II is known that the U.S. navy has indeed expcrimenled with the use of dolphins to carry out certain underwater tasks. And anyone, who knows anything at all about interser- vice rivalry knows the air force doesn't stand around and let the navy gel sole credit for some new breakthrough Conducting Its Own Any lime the navy has a fish-training program in the works, you can bel Ihe air force is conducling its own pisca- torial project. Some clue as to what may be afool in Labrador may be found by lurning to any good encyclopedia and looking up "flying fish." There you will learn that Virgil Partch certain types of finny creatures can aviate through the troposphere for distances up to feel. Which is more than enough tor the air force to claim juris- diction. Now suppose a school of fly- ing fish was outfitted with some type of high explosive. And suppose they were trained lo launch themselves a! a given target at a given signal. No enemy city or installation within feet of the coastline would be safe. Since nothing has leaked, the project musl be strictly hush- hush..But if congressmen were even halfway alerl to what's going on around them, they could figure these things out for themselves. Discover for yourself int- rust, low-cost results you get from classified ads! Street Signs Falling Prey To Tourists SAN FHANCISCO Visitors ofU'ii luuvo their hearts in Sun Francisco, hut sumo of llit'in iiro taking their favorite struul signs ill exchange. Normally, the cil.v loses 500 to ODD signs a year to pole- shinnying thieves, but this year thefts are up. So far have been stolen, and the C'ity's sign man says it's probably the tourists. "I ean't explain why the thefts are said John Giorgi, street sign super- visor. "Maybe it's because we havn more tourists visiting the cil.v." Cost Each sign costs to replace, and San Francisco usually replaces some worth a year. Favorite signs going like hotcakes include: California, Mississippi, Chicago. Moscow. Famous districts and tourist sights too: The sign at the corner of Haighl and Ashbury streets, redolent of the long- gone flower children, and Twin Peaks. Sunset Boulevard is a favorite. Off-beat and picturesque street favorites: Winding Way, Shamrock, Shakespeare, Beacon, Albatross, Sunshine. Sbawnec, Thrift, Tipperary and Blanche. "We've got a long way to go in replacing them and those souvenir hunters will go a long way Oiorgi said. Greasing Poles City officials have tried riveting the signs to posts in- stead of screwing them on. They've even raised signs and greased some poles. But that doesn't stop some street sign lovers, who risk a maximum penalty of a year in jail and a fine. Giorgi said that one man came in and asked to buy a sign. "I told him we couldn't sell it thai the signs are cily property." he said. "And la- said, 'Well, then, what will happen if 1 just go out and take n Cycle This ceramic statue of a frog riding a motorcycle caught the interest of 1wo youngsters at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wis. The statue, created by Paul Dresang of Minneapolis, was among the works on display in an exhibit of "Extraordinary By John Cunniff NEW YORK (AP) Except perhaps in terms of profits, these aren't very comfortable days for big business. The utilities are under attack from customers, ecologisls, politicians and others. The au- tomotive companies are cri- ticized for their pricing policies and polluting ways. The biggest railroad, the Penn Central, is being operated in bankruptcy. Some airlines are in a regulatory bind. Health insurers know all about the troubles that bigness can bring. They are in a fight, as they view it, for their very existence, a fight thai if losl might reduce them to mere clerks in a national health in- surance program. Financially Powerful Nothing crystalizes the fight that big business is in more than the government's anti- trust action against American Telephone and Telegraph, a company thai serves 80 percent of Americans and which is financially more powerful than most nations of the earth. is the symbol. It is huge almost beyond comprehension. It employs more than one million workers. Us assets exceed billion. 11 has raised its net income every year bul one since 1947, earn- ing billion last year. Whether the attacks against big business today are' based strictly in Ihe legalises in an effort, that is, lo preserve the pre-eminence of law over in- dividuals or corporations will continue to be argued. Most of the attacks, from wherever they originate consumer, ecologist, elected representative eventually take a legal form. But this docsn'l disguise completely the likelihood that political activa- tion might lay at Ihe base. Good Politics To attack big business today seems to be good politics. A good portion of the public feels il hasn't performed as effec- tively as it should in holding down prices or in serving the public. II is loo noneompelilive, loo burdened with its own bureaucracy, too self-serving, Ihe crilics say. While many companies con- sider themselves marvels of managerial and technological efficiency, the public often has a different attilude, viewing Ihem as dinosaurs possessed of ravenous, ruinous appetites and selfish disdain. With prices rising throughout Ihe world, many people wonder whalever became of the "economics of volume" they had read about in Economics l. The utilities grow larger and so do their prices. The carmakers, giants of industry, raise (heir prices almost as often as sugar processors The giants have difficulty explaining that if (hey must pay billions of dollars for ecologically desirable improvements, or improve (heir employe fringe benefits, or pay higher raw material prices they must pass some of the cost on to customers. A company such as Interna- tional Business Machines, also under anti-trust atlack. finds il difficull to prove to the public that it is really improving ils efficiency, because there is lit- tle to measure its figures against except its own his- tory. is in the same position in attempting to prove its ef- ficiency. To a great degree il really has no competition and, as many an man will argue, it really shouldn't. Its efficiency, they say, lies in monopoly. John deBulls, chairman, told shareholders in the 1973 annual report lhat the industry has throughout ils history been "a natural monopoly." He ques- tioned "the arbitrary division of the market between our- selves and olhers CARY, N. C. (UPI) Signs posted by a local shopping center owner offering a Srillll reward to anyone killing a burglar inside have the local police chief worried. Police Chief ,1. W. Boles said anyone shooting a burglar would be subject to a possible murder charge and "one heck of a liability suit could come out of that." David Martin posted the signs at the South .Hill shop- ping mall tins week. They also offer for burglars brought in alive. Martin. Ihe victim of five burglaries since July, said he- posted a similar sign eighl years ago after a similar rash nf burglaries at a service .sta- tion lie owns. "1 think very strongly this is a good Martin said. "I'd be yellow backed and have a jelly spine if 1 didn't defend my property." Boston's Hurdy-Gurdy Man Retires: After 75 Years "Obviously he's just had the rug yanked him." out from under River Shannon The River Shannon, longest river in the British Isles, flows 224 miles through Ire- land In the Atlantic Ocean; a canal with 44 locks links it with the Irish Sea at Dublin. LAFF A DAY Hearing Slated On Truck Lengths AMES (UPI) The state would take effect May 1, 1975, department of transportation he said, commission will hold a public hearing Wednesday to allow citizens and organizations to present opinions on proposed rules regulating truck lengths in Iowa. Acting .Director Howard Ciunnerson said the meeting will be al 2 p.m. in Ihe Iowa highway commission offices here. lie said Ihe 1974 Iowa leg- islature charged the new DOT with adopting rules and regu- lations governing Iruck lengths in Iowa, with Ihe new rules to lie presented lo the 1975 session. The new rule BOSTON (UPI) For 74 years, Marino Persechini gave Boston a cheerful tune and a warm smile. He was the hurdy-gurdy ir.au. Rain or shine, since 19011. Persechini has slood on street corners in the city's bustling downtown shopping district grinding out the melodies on his old music machine. It was a meager living fur his wife and six children, but money was not important. "11 was the happiness he got from making other people happy that mattered to recalled his granddaughter, Mrs. Margaret Lomhardi. "lie just loves people. He really does." With his eyesight failing, Persechini was forced to retire earlier this year at the age of !I4. He now lives with his granddaughter's family and recently sold his hurdy gurdy In an antiques dealer in subur- ban Brookline for The man who bought it. Francis O'Boy, gave a formal retirement party for Per- sechini. "It's not very much. I said O'Boy, "but someone should do something for. a man who has provided as much enjoyment for kids and adults as he has." Mrs. Lombard! said giving up the hurdy gurdy after three quarters of a century was hard on her grandfather, who does not speak English. "His heart will always be in downtown she said. "That's where ho had so many friends. I think he misses the hurdy gurdy more than even he will admit. The other day he said, 'I've lost a friend'." O'Boy said he dues not plan lo sell the hurdy gurdy. and will put il on display. "I remember (Ihe music) more than 41) years ago when I was a boy." O'Boy said, "and 1 think it's part of Boston's his- tory. 1 told Mr. Persechini he could come by and play 11 any lime. He probably will, Ion." Begin your (lay the classified ad way sell "don't needs" fast call "Stanley, mother told you bubble gum in a space helmet is a Subaru offers 12 mos. warranty with Sot much more in74. For ditsils call enytime for a recorded meroge. 363-8563 Satisfaction Guaranteed Replacement or Money Refunded BOTH LOCAL STORES OPEN HOUSE Sunday, November 24 NOON to 5 P.M. 10% OFF ALL STOCK The Grill will be open in the Coach tighf Room DOWNTOWN STORE   

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