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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 19, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 19, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- I'urlly cloudy tonight and Wcducsduy. Lows tonight, mid lu .upper Ms. Highs Wednesday, upper 40s. VOLUME 82 NUMBER 314 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES 8 of 9 on Senate Unit For Rocky WASHINGTON (AP) flight of the nine senate rules.commit- tee members have indicated they intend to recommend that the senate confirm Nelson Rock- efeller as vice-president. The committee ended its hear- ings Monday and is expected lo vote by the end of the week. Chairman Cannon (D-Nev.) said it will meet Wednesday to discuss its recommendation. The house judiciary committee begins hearings on the nomina- tion Thursday. Of the senate committee's four Republicans and five Dem- ocrats, only Sen. Allen (D-Ala.) said he had not made up his mind how to vole. He said his indecision was based on philosophical questions rather than any qualms aboul Rockefeller's ethics. "Only Thing" "The only thing holding me back is my disapproval of his big-government philosophy: tax and Allen said. Cannon and Sen. Byrd (D-W said they expect lo give Rockefeller the benefit of any doubts they have and to vote lo recommend confirmation. Cannon said the committee will probably not be able to issue its written report before next Tuesday. That timing wil! probably make it almost impos- sible for the full senate to acl before leaving on its briel Thanksgiving, recess. "I don't know of any senator who would want lo vote without reading our Cannon said. Senate Democratic Leader Mansfield (Mont.) had said he would try lo get a senate vole next week if the committee re- ported the nomination this week. President Ford and other leading Republicans have cri- ticized the delay in confirma- tion. Byrd View Cannon and other Democrats have said it was essential to take a close look at loans and gifts by Rockefeller to friends and political associates. Byrd, who has been Rocke- feller's most persistent ques- tioner, said Monday he believes some of Ihe gifts and interest- free loans to public officials in New York almost but not quite crossed the line into il- Three Israelis Held In Building Are Slain legality. He told William Ronan Ihe facts surrounding in Rockefeller loans and gifts to him come close to violating the letter of the New York bribery statute. However, the law requires proof that a gift was "intended" lo influence the office-holder in the performance of his official duty, Byrd said. Moro Assured Italian Majority ROME nate Aldo Moro, his Christian Democrat party rocked by Com- munist gains in municipal elec- tions, won the support Tuesday of all four parlies in Italy's fallen center-left coalition. After 48 days of political vacuum, he won the backing of the tiny Republican parly for a two-party minority govern- ment. The Socialists and anti- Communist Social at each other's throats through- out the crisis, pledged to give him their voles in parliament, assuring him a working ma- -UPI Tclculiolo SCOUT AWARD TO FORD President Ford received ithe Golden Pheasant Award from Japa- nese Boy Scouts Tuesday. Harwhiko Murase, 13, is shown saluting the President after presenting the award, which Ford is wearing. It is the ihighest honor bestowed by Japan's Boy Scout movement. (Anoth- er photo on picture page.) Ford Assures Tanaka of Stable Supply of Farm Imports, Renews Invitation to Emperor TOKYO (AP President Ford began the first American presidential visit to Japan Tues- day by meeting with Emperor Hirohito Minister and assuring Prime Kakuci Tanaka that Japan can count on "a stable supply of agricultural imports from the United Stales." Ford also renewed a Ihrec- year-old invitation for the em- peror to visit the U. S. "We look forward to his Secretary of State Kissinger told a news conference, indicating the invi- tation was accepted. Ford's talk with Tanaka and meeting in Vladivostok next weekend Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. Kissinger, who will go to Peking from Vladivostok, said he would stop in Tokyo next week to tell the Japanese leaders about the meeting with Brezhnev and his talks with the Chinese. Meets Emperor The meeting between Ford and the emperor to the strains of the Universily of Mi- chigan fight song was the first between a Japanese ruler and an American President on i Japanese soil. Though entirely oilier high-ranking Japanese of-, symbolic, Kissinger said it was inr-nilv ficials also dealt with the locally touchy question weapons aboard nuclear S. navy ships visiting Japanese ports, the global oil situation and U. S. relations with China and Ihe So- viet Union. Kissinger said Ford expressed his desire lo maintain a steady :low of U. S. agricultural ship- ments lo Japan. The flow was tha[ disturbed last year when former President Nixon temporarily imposed an embargo on soy- bean exports, a major source of protein in the Japanese diet. Weapons Issue The secretary of stale said the President also "expressed his understanding for the special sensitivities" of the Japanese about nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons arc barred jfrom Japanese territory, and Tanaka's government was acu- tely embarrassed when a re- tired American admiral told a U. S. congressional committee earlier this year Ihat American navy ships visiting foreign porls did not unload their nuclear weapons. Kissinger said any special questions arising in Ihe nuclear area would be 'handled by him and Foreign Minister Toshio Ki- mura. Ford also gave Tanaka and Democrats.Ihis a of his Pounds of Explosives Found settlement denied Ihej BELFAST (UPI) Police par[ "has meaning to the Japanese an indication that it was considered the most signifi- cant part of the visit. Ford received (lie emperor all had a private chat the Akasaka stale guest palace where the President is staying. After Ihc two stood at atten- tion for Ihe playing of their na- tional anthems, they met the Tokyo diplomatic corps and re- viewed an honor guard in the cobbleslonedi palace courtyard. It was then that the Japanese military band struck up Michi- gan's "Hail to the which the former Michigan foot- ball star often] has played in- stead of "Hail to the Chief" dur- ing his appearances in Ihe U. S. Strictly Protocol Tile stooped, bespectacled cm- peror, who is 73, then took Ford for a 10-minute drive to the 1m- oerial palace where Ihe Pres- ident met Empress Nagako and Ihe couple. By custom, the emperor does not discuss politics or give opin- ions when meeting with foreign leaders. His talk with Ford was strictly a protocol event. Due to the massive security screen to protect the President from leftist demonstrators and 24-hour transportation .strike that was in part a demon- stration, (here were few crowds in evidence. BEITSHEAN, Israel (UPI) Israeli soldiers stormed a small apartment house in the frontier (own of Beit Shean Tuesday and killed three grenade-throw- ing Arab guerillas, ending a three-hour siege. Three Israelis, two housewives and a man, were killed and In- terrorists, only formation Minister Aharon out." Yariv said all three we're shot Iby the guerillas, two as they Iried to escape down a stairway. Twenty people were injured leaping from windows. Set Afire Six angry Israelis ran into the building, dragged the bullet- riddled bodies of the three gue- rillas to a second-foor window and dumped them out. They poured gasoline on the corpses and set them afire. One of the bodies was headless. Police raced lo the blazing corpses, doused them with vater and look Ihe bodies away "rom the enraged mob. Then Ihe angry mob turned on newsmen and photographers and bcal them for taking pic- lures of the scene. Defense Minister Shimon Peres praised the army assault against the besieged building as 'fast, daring and to the point." In Beirut, an olficial of the Palestine Liberation Organiza- tion said Ihe Arab attack was another phase in Ihe Palestinian revolution. Peace Negotiations Ahmed Abdel Rahman, edilor icld with the guerillas inside the building even though they were equipped with a loud- ;peaker. "They did not communicate with the outside he told icwsmen. "Our operation was )ascd on the principle that here can he no exchange with to wipe them 15 "Strugglers" A statement said the raiders had wanted lo obtain the release f 15 jailed inelud- ng Greek Catholic Archbishop lilarion Cappucci, who is being ried in Jerusalem on gun-run- ning charges. Witnesses said the Arabs, armed with grenades and rifles, ineaked into town just before dawn and shot their way into he four-story building on Hagi- )orim street. A man hurled himself from the third floor to escape the guerillas. Two children ran out of the apartments screaming (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) WASHINGTON (UPI) As Court Curbs State Power Over Firms WASHINGTON (AP) The supreme court Tuesday curbec the power of stales lo rcgulati oul-of-state firms doing busines; within their borders. In an I) lo 1 decision, the court Mississippi could not tli'mklvenl of Ihe PLO Tbawra, said lie guerilla raids harmed political without Mississippi business the Watergate cover-up began to collapse in April, 1973, Pres- ident Nixon and his top aides discussed ways to make it look ike Nixon personally "cracked" the case, according to a White House tape played in court Tuesday. A tape of an April 14, 1973, meeting between Nixon and aides II. R. Haldeman and John Ehrichman both of them now standing trial for the cover-up showed when played' in the cover-up trial that they were resigned to Ihe growing public awareness of possible top-level involvement in Watergate and were trying "o cut their losses. Haldeman and Ehrlichman ;uggested during the meeting hat Nixon himself move to 'nail" two top officials of Ills 973 re-election campaign farmer Attorney General Mit- chell and Jeb Stuart Magruder. "Persuade Liddy" Ehrlichman also relayed a suggestion from another Nixon aide, Charles Colson, that Nixon persuade Watergate master- mind G. Gordon Liddy to talk to the prosecutors. "You would send, you'd send word to him and of course want- ing liim to make full disclosure in some way you would be ac- tivist on this Ehrlichman told Nixon. "He (Colson) wants negotiations for peace. "The Viet Cong continued their struggle in the field while Ihcy were talking peace in he said. "We arc doing (he same Ihing." The PLO acls as an umbrella for the main guerilla groups censes from suing in state courts for breach of contract. In another decision, the court ruled unanimously I hat former employes of a bankrupt firm have the same priority in col- his aides later dis- cussed the idea of having Ma- gruclcr, who had perjured him- self before the grand jury, tell the truth and seek immunity by attempting lo "nail" Mitchell. The three also discussed the lecling back wages as the gov- possibility of strong-arming Mit- crnment does in collecting jnlo going before the including the Popular wilhlioldings. jury voluntarily lo tell his cratic Front for the Liberation jmcnt attorneys had argued that Ihus drawing attention of Palestine, which claimed tax-withholding c I a i ms away from Ihc While House. sponsibilily for the attack. But Ford'threw his Japanese ,fron' in Damascus jty. [should be given a higher priori- bodyguards and U. .S. secret service agents into brief confu- sion when he abruptly halted his car after leaving the palace and got oul lo shake hands with some of the flag-waving Ihat Ihe building housed "a number of enemy intelligence officers and their families." T h c Popular Democratic Front for Ihe Liberation of Pal- estine, a radical offshoot of the PLO, issued Seeking Son's Release, Holds Ambassador and Aide 12 Hours Japanese on the street. communique 1 _________________jlater in Damascus saying Ihe three guerillas set off explosives which led to destruction of the building, and death of Ihc four "martyrs and a large number of Communists, Italy's second larg- est parly, Ilie increased voice in government Ihcy have been demanding. Tntlutfs Clniclflf If you must make mistakes, it will br lo your advanlaRr lo make a new one e.ieh time. raided a house early Tuesday and uncovered pounds of explosives, Ihe largest cache ever found in Northern Ireland. THSS Haps liiicklcy MOSCOW (AP) Tass news (agency Tuesday crilicized Son. WASHINGTON (AP) -A fa- ther seeking release of his son from the Philippines held Ihc Philippine ambassador and wounded aide hostage almost 12 hours before throwing down his gun and surrendering. Napoleon Lechoco tossed the weapon from a second-floor win- dow of Ihe Philippine chancery about 2 a.m. Tuesday and sur- rendered peacefully after re- ceiving word that his son, who been prevented from joining Ihe rest of the fam- ily here, had left Ihe Philippines by airliner. "Mr. Lechoco fell he had ac- complished what he set out to said embassy spokesman R. V. Cruz. Lechoco was taken into cus- tody by FBI agents and an of- ficial said he would be ar- raigned on a charge of assault- ing a diplomatic officer. The U. S. attorney's office said he would also be charged under a section of Ihe federal kidnaping statutes Ihat applies lo foreign officials. Marcos Pledge Philippine President Marcos had sent his personal assur- ances to the embassy that Napo-j loon Lechoco, jr., 24, would be allowed to leave if his father would free the hostages. The father said he would re- lease Eduardo Kflmuahlez and In Manila; authorities said Ihc son was picked up from the home of his grandfather in neighboring Quezon City. Romualdez was released un- harmed, but the attache, Mario Lagdameo, a deep flesh wound which doctors ,said was caused by a gunshot. Lay on Floor A Philippine diplomat, Jose Naldo, said Lagdameo, who holds a black bell in karate, was wounded when he tried lo wrestle with Lechoco. He said (he three spent most of the siege lying on Ihc floor of Lcohcco feared Ihe possibility of sniper shots through the win- Negolialions had been going on since shortly after Lechoco look the two men liostagc around 3 p m. Monday. Police quickly made telephone contact with him and FBI agents en- tered the talks. Mrs. Lechoco was taken to Ihei the enemy." Street Protests I n East Jerusalem, high school girls threw rocks at po- lice in Ihe second day of street protests there against Israeli rule. About 30 girls were arrest- ed, after being sprayed by water from water cannon. high-pressure The justices also issued an unsigned opinion requiring u federal district court to hear a Virginia man's challenge of his conviction under a state narcotics law later declared unconstitutional. The breach of contract case stemmed from a rise in cotton prices in 1973, which prompted many Mississippi farmers lo break their contracts with out- of-stale purchasers. The Allenburg Co., Inc., of Memphis, Tenn., sued Mississip- pi farmer Ben Pittman, but Ihe Mississippi supreme court dis- missed the suit because Allen- burg did not have a state certifi- cate of authority. Justice Douglas, speaking for jthc supreme court, said (he cot- In Bethlehem, on Jerusalem's ton shipments were part of in- southern boundary, 49 students were rounded up by army embassy lo relay the word from Marcos to her husband. Mrs. Lechoco was taken to the embassy to relay the word troops before they could orga- jnize a strike of two local high tcrslate commerce even though they were delivered to a ware- house in Mississippi. He said Ihc cotton could not schools. Demonstrations thereihave reached its interstate des- away fn News Story Ehrlichman then concocted a possible news story that could be written if tilings were han- dled right and the White House released evidence against Mit- chell and Magruder. He con- cluded it by saying: "Charges of cover-up by the White House were, uh, uli, ma- terially dispelled by the diligent efforts of the President and his aides in, uh, moving on evi- dence which came to their hands in the closing days of the previous week." Nixon answered, "I, I'd buy that." Mitchell Laughs Mitchell smiled frequently and occasionally laughed while listening lo Nixon, Haldeman and Ehrlichman discussing scen- arios which would have him take the blame for Watergate. When the trial was about lo recess for lunch John Wilson, Haklcman's attorney, protested to U. S. District Judge John and in other west bank villagesItination without the sorting Ihat Sirica that he could hear laugh- UlMIJllJ'JJ (Ml- 1HJIU from Marcos lo her husband. seventh slra.ghl day of anti-Israeli disturbances. Maj. Gen. Rafael Eylan, Lechoco walked into the chan- cery Monday afternoon after re- Israel's not hern front command- is done at the warehouse. Juslice Rehnquisl said in dis- sent Ihat Ihc decision conflicled ler from spectators in the courl- oom. "This is a pretty sad case, Romualdez' olficc because] (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) !er, said no negotiations were [similar cases. with past rulings of the court inlet's face the judge com- Facing Death Counts, Gets Jobs Post his economic attache two hours i Buckley as an enemy of 'delcnle who is "heaping one an-jaftrr his son was airborne, and ill-Soviet coiiciiclion on an-jal the appointed hour the sur- Xilher." render I'Kik place. INDIANAPOLIS (AP) City officials are trying to de- termine how a former convict, currently under indictment for three murders but free on bond, got a job with Ihe met- ropolitan manpower commis- sion. David Roberts, now being held in the connly jail for Ihe rape of a 111-year-old woman and the kidnap-death of her ft- month-old son last week, was hired by Ihc commission as a job placement f.pedalisl last month, officials said. David commission administrator, said Roberts began work Oct. 28 and was classified as a very good em- ploye. "We didn't know charges were still pending against Carlcy said. "We're trying to determine what has happened, and how he was employed. He is el ill on Ihc city payroll, but all indica- tions are he will be terminat- ed at the end of the week." II is standard procedure Ihat all prospective city em- ployes are checked out lo de- termine if they have convic- tions or charges pending, but. said Ibis was not done in Roberts' case. Roberts came to the com- mission from a work-release program. Carlcy said his sala- ry is yearly. Roberts, 30, is held without bond now after being iden- tified by a woman who said she was raped Thursday and locked in Ihe trunk of her car, with her baby abandoned in weeds along a city street. His frozen body was found Friday by a child on Ihe way to school. The case has been continued until Nov. 25. Roberts served six years in the stale reformatory for rap- ing two women who were found locked in car trunks. He was involved in a reformatory disturbance in which one inmate was killed and 4ii were injured. Roberts was indicted March by a grand jury on nine counts of murder in connec- tion with the Jan. 20 deaths (if Bill Patrick, 20; his wife, 23; and their year-old daughter. Their bodies were found in Ihe ashes of their New Whiteland home, which had been doused with gasoline, then set afire. P a trick was the only witness scheduled lo testify against Roberts for the Ihefl of four tires from the depart- ment store where Patrick worked. Huberts was held imtil Kept. 17, when officials decided Iherc was insufficient evidence lo hold him without bail, lie was released on bond, lie is scheduled for trial May 12. mentcd, adding that the federal marshals were under inslruc- ions to eject anyone who aughcd during the trial. During a March 27 meeting, Haldeman gave Nixon a dc- (Continued: Page 3, Col. R.) Today's Index Comics .....................IS Crossword ..................18 Daily Record ................3 Deaths......................3 Editorial Features Farm Financial Marion Movies............ Society............ Sports Stale Television Want Ads......... li ...12 ...19 R ....17 ....10 13-Hi II 21-25   

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